Trump's immigration ban: What to know

Published: Saturday, January 28, 2017 @ 8:19 PM
Updated: Saturday, January 28, 2017 @ 8:19 PM


            PHILADELPHIA, PA - JANUARY 26: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a luncheon at the Congress of Tomorrow Republican Member Retreat January 26, 2017 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Republican Congressional members gathered in Philadelphia to participate in the retreat. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
            Alex Wong
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JANUARY 26: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a luncheon at the Congress of Tomorrow Republican Member Retreat January 26, 2017 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Republican Congressional members gathered in Philadelphia to participate in the retreat. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)(Alex Wong)

Protesters demonstrated, again, in cities across the country on Sunday as anger over President Donald Trump's executive order banning citizens from seven Middle Eastern countries from entering the United States boiled over.

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Demonstrators rallied in New York, Washington, and Boston and in smaller cities across the U.S. Protests also converged on the nation's largest airports for a second straight day.

“I’ll be joining New Yorkers at Battery Park this afternoon to stand up for our city’s values,” New York Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted. 

Trump signed an executive order on Friday that bans citizens from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia, and Yemen from entering the U.S. for 90 days. It also suspended the U.S. refugee program for 120 days.

White House officials clarified on Sunday that the order does not apply to certain people.

The action “doesn’t affect green card holders moving forward,” Priebus said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

What can states do?

The attorney generals of 15 states and the District of Columbia issued a joint statement Sunday condemning Trump's executive order as unconstitutional.

The Associated Press reported that the attorney generals said religious liberty has been a bedrock principle of the U.S. and that no president can change that truth.

Washington, California, New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Hawaii, Virginia, Oregon, Connecticut, Vermont, Illinois, New Mexico, Iowa, Maine and Maryland signed onto the statment.

The attorney generals also predicted Trump's order will be struck down.

What about detainees?

There was no exact number on Sunday on how many people were still detained in the U.S. as a result of Trump’s travel ban, according to lawyers with the American Civil Liberties Union.

The ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project deputy director Lee Gelernt told reporters on Sunday that there was still confusion over the status of detainees and the new rules for entering the country, according to the Associated Press.

Gelernt said the ACLU is waiting for a list of detainee names from the government to try to determine who has been detained.

Trump said Saturday the order is "not a Muslim ban."

"It's working out very nicely," he said. "We're going to have a very, very strict ban and we're going to have extreme vetting, which we should have had in this country for many years."

Reaction to the ban

Reaction to the executive order has been swift and varied, from thousands of protesters across the U.S. to politicians and international governments.

The University of Notre Dame, among others, is calling on Trump to rescind the restrictions on refugees entering the U.S.  The Rev. John Jenkins called Trump's action indiscriminate and abrupt and predicted it would diminish the country.

The executive order Trump signed on Friday suspends the U.S. refugee program for 120 days and barrs Syrians from entering the country indefinitely.

What is the “immigration ban?”

Any non-U.S. citizen from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia or Yemen is now barred from entering the United States.

Legal permanent residents -- green card and visa-holders -- from those seven countries who were out of the United States after Friday cannot return to the U.S. for 90 days.

>>Read the executive order

The order also singled out Syrians for the most aggressive ban, indefinitely blocking entry for anyone from that country, including those fleeing civil war.

The order also directed U.S. officials to review information as needed to fully vet foreigners asking to come to the U.S. and draft a list of countries that don't provide that information. That left open the possibility that citizens of other countries could also face a travel ban.

Are there exceptions?

There's an exemption for immigrants and legal permanent residents whose entry is in the U.S. national interest.

Visa and green card holders already in the U.S. will be allowed to stay. Foreign government, United Nations, international organization and NATO visas are also exempt.

The U.S. may still admit refugees on a case-by-case basis during the freeze. Also officials would continue to process requests from people claiming religious persecution "provided that the religion of the individual is a minority religion in the individual's country."

What happened to travelers as the order took effect?

The immediate fallout from Trump's order meant that an untold number of foreign-born U.S. residents now traveling outside the U.S. could be stuck overseas for at least 90 days — despite holding permanent residency "green cards" or other visas.

Foreign nationals who were allowed to board flights before the order was signed Friday were being detained at U.S. airports and told they were no longer welcome.

>>Read Protests erupt in response to Trump's executive order on immigration

This has prompted protests online and at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York where a crowd of protesters grew Saturday as word got out that up to a dozen travelers had been detained in connection with the executive order.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Jim Rodford, bassist for The Kinks, dead at 76

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 7:17 PM

INDIO, CA - APRIL 28:  (EDITORS NOTE: This image has been converted to black and white.) Musician Jim Rodford of The Zombies performs on the Palomino stage during day 1 of 2017 Stagecoach California's Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club on April 28, 2017 in Indio, California.  (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for Stagecoach)
Frazer Harrison
INDIO, CA - APRIL 28: (EDITORS NOTE: This image has been converted to black and white.) Musician Jim Rodford of The Zombies performs on the Palomino stage during day 1 of 2017 Stagecoach California's Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club on April 28, 2017 in Indio, California. (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for Stagecoach)(Frazer Harrison)

Jim Rodford, bassist for popular rock band The Kinks from 1978 to 1996, has died at 76, according to the band.

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The Kinks, whose hits include “You Really Got Me,” “Lola,” “I’m Not Like Everybody Else,” “A Well-Respected Man,” “Victoria” and “Waterloo Sunset,” made the announcement Saturday on its official social media accounts.

“It is with deep sadness that we have learned that Jim Rodford passed away – he toured and recorded with the Kinks for many years and will be greatly missed. He was much loved by all of us #JimRodford,” the band said on Twitter.

Founding member Dave Davies also expressed his sorrow over Rodford’s “sudden loss.”

“I’m devastated Jim’s sudden loss I’m too broken up to put words together it’s such a shock I always thought Jim would live forever in true rock and roll fashion – strange – great friend great musician great man – he was an integral part of the Kinks later years RIP,” he wrote on Twitter.

Although Rodford did not play for the band when they burst onto the scene in the ’60s, he was credited by Davies as being an integral part of “The Kinks” in their later years. Rodford would later return to the band The Zombies.

Florida group raffles off rifle to benefit children's program

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 5:50 PM

An assault rifle is a prize in a raffle to raise money for programs to help disadvantaged children. (Photo: WFTV.com)
An assault rifle is a prize in a raffle to raise money for programs to help disadvantaged children. (Photo: WFTV.com)

An assault rifle is a prize in a raffle to raise money for programs to help disadvantaged children.

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Channel 9 found out that phone calls to buy tickets for the raffle go to three Central Florida county jails.

The flyer advertising the raffle was created by the Florida Council on Crime and Delinquency.

It advertises a chance to win an AR-15 rifle. There are phone numbers on the flyer to buy $20 tickets.

Every one of the numbers directs the caller to someone's desk at the Orange, Seminole and Osceola County jails.

Some were perplexed by the offer.

“Probably a good value, but it’s very bizarre and counterintuitive,” said Andrew Shure.

Information on the raffle to win the $1,200 gun was tweeted by the St. Cloud police.

The local Florida Council on Crime and Delinquency chapter said the $6,800 or so raised would be used for community projects, like buying gifts for underprivileged children.

“They could raffle off a car or something other than a gun. That doesn’t make sense to raffle off a gun,” said Laura Stephenson.

Officials in Orange and Seminole counties seemed surprised that calls for information about the AR-15 raffle were going to county jail offices.

There is an asterisk on the flyer that said the winner must comply with applicable laws and background checks.

A member of this organization said that they won't really be handing over a rifle to the winner, but instead a certificate they can use to pick up the gun.

Girl, 9, unknowingly hands out THC-laced candy to classmates, school says

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 8:35 PM

File photo.    (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
David McNew/Getty Images
File photo. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)(David McNew/Getty Images)

A 9-year-old girl unwittingly ate, and handed out to other classmates, THC-laced candy, school officials said. 

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The girl brought the candies to school last Thursday and said she could not see; another girl ate them and started to feel dizzy, Albuquerque School of Excellence Dean of Elementary School Students Kristy Del Curto told KRQE

“We noticed the student who initially brought the edible to our school was acting strange. She started saying she couldn’t see,” Del Curto said.

Three students shared one gummy and the student who handed it out had three or four pieces, Del Curto said. 

Paramedics were called and monitored the students, who eventually recovered. 

The student who brought them to school did not know they were medicinal, THC-laced gummies, Del Curto said.

“As marijuana becomes legal in each state, it’s going to become more and more of an issue, I believe,” Del Curto said.

Man shot in leg during drug deal outside Walmart, police say

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 8:30 PM

A man was shot in the leg during a drug deal outside a Walmart, police say. (Photo: Journal-News)
A man was shot in the leg during a drug deal outside a Walmart, police say. (Photo: Journal-News)

Police are looking for the suspect who shot a man during a drug deal around 3 p.m. Saturday in a Walmart parking lot.

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According to Sgt. Brandon McCroskey of the Fairfield Township police, the suspect shot the victim in the leg during a drug deal while the victim was in his vehicle. The victim then accelerated his vehicle and struck other vehicles and a cart corral.

The suspect fled the scene on foot. Police believe the suspect was picked up by the same vehicle that dropped him off: a red 2007 Toyota Camry reported stolen Friday. 

The victim, who is in his late teens, was taken to the West Chester Hospital. His injuries are not life threatening, McCroskey said.

According to McCroskey, the suspect is in his late teens to early 20s with a goatee.

The incident remains under investigation.