Texas high school football players kicked off team for protesting during national anthem

Published: Saturday, September 30, 2017 @ 10:13 PM

2 Texas High School Football Players Removed From Team For Protesting During National Anthem

Two high school football players were kicked off the team following their protest during the national anthem Friday night.

Cedric Ingram-Lewis raised his fist as his cousin Larry McCullough knelt during “The Star-Spangled Banner” before Victory & Praise Christian Academy played Providence Classical, according to the Houston Chronicle.

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When the anthem ended, coach Ronnie Mitchem, a veteran who served as a Marine and started the school’s football program six years ago, asked the players to take off their uniforms and dismissed them from the team.

"He told us that disrespect will not be tolerated," Ingram-Lewis told the Chronicle about what Mitchem said after the anthem. "He told us to take off our uniform and leave it there."

Mitchem had instructed players previously not to kneel, citing his military service. He suggested players could kneel after scoring a touchdown, or that they could write and hand out a flyer about the issues.

"Like I said, I'm a former Marine. That just doesn't fly, and they knew that. I don't have any problem with those young men. We've had a good relationship. They chose to do that, and they had to pay for the consequences,” Mitchem said.

Ingram-Lewis’s mother Rhonda Brady supports her son and nephew and was surprised by Mitchem’s decision.

"I'm definitely going to have a conversation, because I don't like the way that that was handled," Brady told the Chronicle. "But I don't want them back on the team. A man with integrity and morals and ethics and who truly lives by that wouldn't have done anything like that. Actions speak louder than words. So, for him to do what he did, that really spoke volumes, and I don't want my kids or my nephew to be around a man with no integrity."

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VP Mike Pence ready for secret meeting with North Korea, but North backs out

Published: Tuesday, February 20, 2018 @ 9:05 PM

Vice President Mike Pence, and seond lady, Karen Pence are pictured just in front of North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un's sister, Kim Yo Jong  (back left) during the Opening Ceremony of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at PyeongChang Olympic Stadium on February 9, 2018 in Pyeongchang-gun, South Korea.  
Matthias Hangst/Getty Images
Vice President Mike Pence, and seond lady, Karen Pence are pictured just in front of North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un's sister, Kim Yo Jong (back left) during the Opening Ceremony of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at PyeongChang Olympic Stadium on February 9, 2018 in Pyeongchang-gun, South Korea. (Matthias Hangst/Getty Images)

Vice President Mike Pence was ready for a secret meeting with North Korean officials at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, earlier this month, but the North backed out, according to news outlets.

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Pence attended the Olympics Opening Ceremony on Feb. 9 as part of a five-day trip to Asia and was seated near Kim Jong-un’s sister, but did not speak to her, creating a media sensation.

The North canceled the meeting just two hours before Pence was scheduled to meet with Kim Jong-un’s sister, Kim Yo Jong, and another North Korean state official, Kim Yong Nam, on Feb. 10 after Pence announced new sanctions against the North Korean regime during his trip and rebuked it for its nuclear program, according to the Washington Post, which was the first to report on the secret meeting.

“North Korea dangled a meeting in hopes of the vice president softening his message, which would have ceded the world stage for their propaganda during the Olympics,” the vice president’s chief of staff, Nick Ayers, said in a statement, according to The Hill.

>> Related: NBC apologizes for comment about Japan, South Korea during Olympics opening ceremony

News of the secret meeting comes as relations between the communist north and democratic south seem to be thawing in recent weeks with the announcement last month from Kim Jong-un that he was sending a delegation to the Olympics. He sent his sister to lead the group.

North Korea Announces They Will Participate In 2018 Olympics

“We regret [the North Koreans'] failure to seize this opportunity," State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said in a statement. "We will not apologize for American values, for calling attention to human rights abuses, or for mourning a young American’s unjust death."

>> Related: Olympic gold medalist, skater Meagan Duhamel, uses platform to spotlight dog meat trade

Pence said he planned to use his trip to the Olympics to prevent North Korea from using the games as a ploy for favorable propaganda on the communist regime.

VIDEO: Kim Jong Un’s Sister Arrived in South Korea for 2018 Winter Olympics

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Parents locked 4 adopted children in separate bedrooms, restricted food, bathroom use, police say

Published: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 2:28 AM

Parents Accused of Locking Adopted Children In Rooms, Restricting Food and Bathroom Use

An Arizona couple is facing child abuse charges after police say they locked their four adopted children in separate bedrooms, restricting access to food and bathrooms.

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Alabama police officer shot, killed; suspect dead

Published: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 4:36 AM

Mobile Police Officer Justin Billa. (Photo credit: Mobile Police Department)
Mobile Police Department
Mobile Police Officer Justin Billa. (Photo credit: Mobile Police Department)(Mobile Police Department)

An Alabama police officer who was shot Tuesday night has died, authorities say.

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Alabama Sen. Doug Jones calls arming teachers 'the dumbest idea I've ever heard'

Published: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 2:04 AM

What You Need To Know: Doug Jones

Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) called an Alabama push to arm teachers “the dumbest idea [he had] ever heard” and “crazy.”

>> 5 things to know about Doug Jones, winner of the Alabama Senate race

Alabama’s state House is considering a bill that would allow teachers to carry firearms. State Rep. Will Ainsworth – who is sponsoring the bill – introduced it during a press conference at an Alabama elementary school. Ainsworth, a Republican, said teachers carrying guns would be required to undergo 40 hours of training before being certified to carry a gun in the classroom, AL.com reports. The state won’t pay for a teacher’s gun.

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Ainsworth said the law was about giving kids “a fighting chance.”

“The only way we can do that is to have people armed in the schools to fight back,” he said.

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But to Jones, the new law doesn’t make any sense. He told WKRG: “I think that’s the dumbest idea I’ve ever heard. I think it’s crazy. You don’t need 40 to 50 guns in there, and it’s a cost issue. You’re going to have to train those teachers. You don’t need to arm America in order to stop this; you just need to be smart about it.”

Jones was elected to the upper chamber in December after a heated race with Republican candidate Roy Moore. The former U.S. attorney has advocated for gun control in the past while simultaneously being a Second Amendment supporter. During the Senate race, the National Rifle Association spent almost $55,000 on mailers against him. He was the first Democrat elected to a Senate seat from Alabama in over two decades.

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This isn’t the first time that pro-gun politicians have suggested arming educators, but the notion is getting another push in the wake of the Parkland, Florida, school shooting that left 17 dead. A sheriff in one of Florida’s biggest counties said his department is putting together a program to train and arm teachers. Even Department of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has been asked about the idea, although she declined to take a stand on the issue, instead saying: “I think this is an important issue for all states to grapple with and to tackle. They clearly have the opportunity and the option to do that and there are differences in how states approach this.”

Rare reached out to Sen. Doug Jones’ office but received no comment.

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