Ex-Secret Service agent 'sexted' teens on White House grounds, sentenced to 20 years

Published: Friday, May 19, 2017 @ 12:43 PM

Lee Robert Moore (Photo provided by the Delaware Department of Justice)
Lee Robert Moore (Photo provided by the Delaware Department of Justice)

former U.S. Secret Service agent was sentenced to 20 years in prison on Thursday after admitting he sent sexually-charged emails and nude photos of himself to a South Florida teen and other young girls from his post at the White House.

>> Read more trending news

Saying Lee Robert Moore “dishonors every man and woman who has ever worn the uniform,” a federal prosecutor pushed for a life sentence in prison for the former agent and U.S. Marine, who was stripped of his high-security clearance shortly after he was arrested in late 2015 at his home in Church Hill, Maryland.

While making it clear that a life sentence would be too harsh, U.S. District Judge Daniel Hurley made it equally clear that the 15-year sentence Moore sought wasn’t sufficient to protect teens from those who prey on them on the Internet.

Moore, 38, never made physical contact with the three teens to whom he sent lewd messages while working at the White House. But, Hurley said, he was disturbed that Moore contacted his victims through a phone app that also showed him their locations. Moore also told the girls that he dreamed of meeting them for sex, sent them nude photos of himself and enticed them to send him explicit photos of themselves.

“I have great concerns about the recruitment theme (of the messages),” Hurley said. “I’m not satisfied that it was just discussion.”

Moore’s arrest and conviction is yet another black eye for the elite law enforcement agency that has been riddled with scandals. Moore was working for the agency in the Obama Administration when agents were disciplined for drinking and using prostitutes while on assignment. A year before Moore’s arrest, a security contractor with a criminal record was allowed to get on an elevator with Obama and an Iraq war veteran jumped the White House fence and made it into the East Room before he was tackled.

In emails and texts to his victims, Moore identified himself as a law enforcement agent, without saying where he worked. He told them he was bored with his job, checking identification and patrolling the White House grounds on a bicycle.

In a letter to Hurley, Moore’s wife said her husband was disappointed to be transferred back to the White House. He loved his job as a firearms instructor at the Secret Service training academy, she said.

However, Moore didn’t blame job dissatisfaction for his behavior. Instead, he said, after his two children were born, his wife was consumed with raising them. “I got lonely,” he said. “I was selfish.”

He began using the Internet for sexual gratification. “I turned to the Internet because it seemed to be a softer and safer betrayal to (my wife),” he said, choking back tears. “I was wrong.”

Further, he said, he discovered he had a dark side he didn’t know existed: He liked young girls. “I became a pervert,” he said as his wife, parents and other relatives tearfully looked on.

Ordering Moore to get psychological treatment and register as a sex offender when he is released from prison, Hurley said he didn’t believe the former officer’s actions were driven by a need for companionship. “Someone doesn’t do that just because they get lonely,” he said.

The case against Moore began when a detective with the Delaware State Police, posing as a 14-year-old girl, began exchanging emails with the agent. Eventually, law enforcement found he had been sending lewd messages to a Coconut Creek, Florida, teen for nearly two years and two other teens in Texas and Missouri. The cases filed against him in Florida and Delaware were consolidated.

In March, Moore pleaded guilty to two charges, one of enticing a minor to engage in sexual activity and another of sending obscene material to a person under the age of 16.

Hurley also acknowledged that as a former police officer and convicted child predator, Moore won’t have an easy life in prison. For his protection, he has been segregated from the general population while in the Palm Beach County Jail.

Hurley said he was hopeful federal prison officials would “take into consideration your employment and consider your safety.”

Charles Barkley says he’s ‘nervous’ about Alabama special election, Roy Moore

Published: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 @ 11:33 AM

BIRMINGHAM, AL - DECEMBER 11:  NBA Hall of Famer Charles Barkley speaks during a get out the vote campaign rally for democratic Senatorial candidate Doug Jones on December 11, 2017 in Birmingham, Alabama. Jones is facing off against Republican Roy Moore in tomorrow's special election for the U.S. Senate.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
BIRMINGHAM, AL - DECEMBER 11: NBA Hall of Famer Charles Barkley speaks during a get out the vote campaign rally for democratic Senatorial candidate Doug Jones on December 11, 2017 in Birmingham, Alabama. Jones is facing off against Republican Roy Moore in tomorrow's special election for the U.S. Senate. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)(Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Alabama native and former NBA player Charles Barkley says he is nervous about Tuesday’s special election to fill a vacant U.S. Senate seat in the state.

Speaking to CNN Monday, Barkley indicated he was worried about the outcome of the race, between Democrat Doug Jones and Republican nominee Roy Moore. Barkley is supporting Jones.

“I got to say, I can’t believe we’re in this situation where the people of Alabama are going to turn a blind eye to all the accusations, all the rhetoric, all the racist B.S.,” the NBA Hall of Famer said.

>> Read more trending news

Referring to Moore, Barkley later said that, on paper, there was no chance Moore would get elected.

“If somebody actually sent me a movie script and showed me these two candidates, there’s no way that you say -- there’s no way that candidate can get elected. With all the ... accusations, all the times he’s gotten let go, fired, kicked off benches. Some of the things he’s said. There’s no way that person would win an election.”

What You Need To Know About Roy Moore

Moore has been accused of pursuing sexual relationships with a number of teenage girls years ago. Many of the women who have come forward said they were minors at the time and that Moore was in his 30s. Moore has denied the allegations.

Yahoo! Sports reported that, earlier Monday, Barkley was at a Birmingham, Alabama, rally in support of Jones and was to-the-point about the election.

“At some point, we’ve got to stop looking like idiots to the nation,” Barkley said. “I love Alabama, but we’ve got to draw a line in the sand.”

Barkley told AL.com he will do his part to ensure a win for Jones.

"It can’t be Roy Moore,” he said. “To me it’s silliness that this guy's trying to win.”

“I’m going to do all I can,” he added. “I don’t want this guy representing my state.”

Polls for Tuesday’s election close at 7 p.m.

5 things to watch in Alabama's U.S. Senate election

Published: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 @ 1:56 AM

Alabama voters head to the polls Tuesday to decide the race for U.S. Senate between Republican Roy Moore and Democrat Doug Jones, and the outcome is being closely watched across the nation.

>> Who is Judge Roy Moore?

No Democrat has been elected to the U.S. Senate from Alabama since 1992, and President Donald Trump won the state by nearly 30 percentage points. But allegations that Moore pursued sexual relationships with teenage girls when he was in his 30s have rocked the race. He’s denied the claims.

>> Who is Doug Jones, Democrat facing Roy Moore in Alabama Senate race?

Jones, a former federal prosecutor, has highlighted his opponent’s outspoken conservative views in his bid to energize the state’s Democratic base and flip suburban voters who typically vote for the GOP. Polls show a tight race, though special elections like the one Tuesday are notoriously hard to predict.

>> Read more trending news

Moore is deeply popular with the state’s evangelical voters, a powerful voting bloc that has enthusiastically supported him in past statewide votes. In the closing weeks of the race, he’s had scattered appearances in rural churches while largely relying on supporters to defend him.

What You Need To Know About Roy Moore

Here are five things to watch with Tuesday’s vote to succeed Jeff Sessions, whose seat became open when Trump tapped him to become U.S. attorney general:

>> Trump tweets support for Roy Moore in Alabama Senate race

1. It’s a big deal. Republicans now control 52 seats in the U.S. Senate, including the one held by Luther Strange, who was appointed to fill Sessions’ seat and was soundly defeated by Moore in September. A Democratic win would mean that Republicans could only afford one “no” vote to pass a Senate measure on party lines, since Vice President Mike Pence would break a 50-50 tie. Some Republicans fear a Moore victory could be equally unsettling for the party. Moore has repeatedly called for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to step down, and he in turn has withheld his support and funding for the former judge’s campaign. And Democrats would look to tie Moore to a host of GOP candidates seeking office in the midterm elections in 2018, highlighting not only accusations that he’s a sexual predator but also his history of controversial statements.

>> WaPo: Another Roy Moore accuser comes forward with evidence of relationship

2. The bombshell allegations. Allegations against Moore of sexual misconduct involving teenagers while a prosecutor in Etowah County, Alabama, from 1977 to 1982 have threatened to upend the race. Moore has denied the allegations while claiming media outlets and Washington status quo enforcers are trying to derail his campaign. The women have stuck by their stories, and several said they are willing to testify under oath. They have left GOP voters who are concerned by the allegations in a quandary, debating between supporting a candidate accused of being a sexual predator or sending a Democrat to Washington. Some could also stay home on Tuesday or write in a candidate.

Roy Moore Accuser Details Alleged Sexual Assault When She Was 16

3. Alabama’s rural base. The state’s rural Republican base holds outsized sway in Alabama, where grass-roots Republicans have helped ensure that no Democrat has been elected to major statewide office since 2006. But Moore’s margins as a statewide candidate show he has underperformed other Republicans. In 2012, he narrowly won a vote for Supreme Court chief justice even as Mitt Romney carried the state by 22 percentage points. And in his 9-point victory over Strange in the primary, Moore struggled in the affluent, conservative suburbs in Birmingham and Huntsville. Moore has tried to shore up his base by crisscrossing rural areas he hopes to carry by overwhelming victories, and his advisers expect enthusiastic turnout to mark the difference in Tuesday’s vote.

4. The key to a Democratic victory. Jones must rely on a two-pronged strategy to flip the seat. He needs Alabama’s black population – a predominantly Democratic voting bloc that accounts for about 27 percent of the state – to turn out in droves. Jones, who is white, has leaned on African-American supporters, including New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, to energize black voters in populous areas like Birmingham in the closing days of the race. He has also wooed voters in Republican-leaning suburbs in the outskirts of Birmingham, Huntsville and Mobile in hopes of convincing them to vote across party lines – or not cast a ballot at all. Some suburban voters who have never cast Democratic ballots say they’ve proudly posted Jones signs in their yards.

5. How the election will affect the 2018 elections in other states. For example, although Georgia and Alabama are vastly different states, Peach State strategists are closely watching their neighbor for clues about next year’s elections in Georgia. Like in Alabama, Democrats in Georgia hope to flip independent voters in affluent suburbs who have fled to the GOP. And Republicans in both states see a path to victory through maximizing their advantage in rural areas. U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Atlanta, was among the black leaders enlisted to help Jones’ campaign across the state line. And Stacey Evans, a Democratic candidate for governor, has already made clear she intends to weaponize Moore’s campaign. She called on her GOP rivals to disavow Moore’s candidacy. None did so.

Who is Doug Jones, Democrat facing Roy Moore in Alabama Senate race?

Published: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 @ 4:22 AM

What You Need To Know: Doug Jones

After sexual misconduct allegations surfaced against Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore in the weeks leading up to Tuesday's special election in Alabama, critics began lining up behind Democrat Doug Jones in the closely watched race.

>> 5 things to watch in Alabama's U.S. Senate election

Here's what we know about Jones, a 63-year-old former federal prosecutor from Birmingham:

>> Who is Judge Roy Moore?

1. He became the U.S. attorney for Alabama's Northern District in 1997. President Bill Clinton appointed him to the post, which Jones held until 2001, according to NBC News.

2. Jones prosecuted two Ku Klux Klan members behind the 1963 16th Street Baptist Church bombing that killed four black girls in Alabama. In the early 2000s, Bobby Frank Cherry and Thomas Blanton were sentenced to life in prison in the case, according to NBC News.

3. He was involved in prosecuting Eric Rudolph, who bombed a Birmingham abortion clinic in 1998. That attack killed an off-duty officer. Rudolph also was behind the deadly 1996 Centennial Olympic Park bombing in Atlanta.

>> Read more trending news 

4. He has spoken in support of Moore's accusers. “Those brave women are entirely credible; they’re telling the truth,” Jones said, according to Newsweek. “Moore will be an embarrassment to the people and businesses of Alabama, and if he makes it to Senate, he’ll continue to divide our country.”

5. He is against repealing the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. Jones also told AL.com that he supports a woman's right to choose to have an abortion but added: "The law for decades has been that late-term procedures are generally restricted except in the case of medical necessity. That's what I support." Read more here.

What You Need To Know About Roy Moore

Anthony Bourdain, Tom Colicchio slam Mario Batali amid allegations

Published: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 @ 10:59 AM

Anthony Bourdain has blasted chef Mario Batali after Batali was accused by multiple women of sexual misconduct.
Paul Zimmerman/Getty Images for Turner/Getty Images for Turner
Anthony Bourdain has blasted chef Mario Batali after Batali was accused by multiple women of sexual misconduct.(Paul Zimmerman/Getty Images for Turner/Getty Images for Turner)

It doesn’t seem that the sexual misconduct allegations brought against celebrity chef Mario Batali were that shocking to some of his colleagues.

In an article published in Eater New York Monday, four women detailed their alleged experiences with sexual misconduct against the “The Chew” star. One chef said that 10 years ago, Batali groped her with his bare hands after spilling wine on her shirt, while another woman said that he inappropriately grabbed her from behind and held her against his own body.

>> Read more trending news

Following the allegations, fellow celebrity chefs including Anthony Bourdain and Tom Colicchio slammed Batali and seemed to insinuate that they knew about the allegations ahead of time.

Related: Chef Mario Batali leaves ‘The Chew’ amid sexual harassment allegations

“No. Trust me. Monday is really gonna suck,” Bourdain wrote on Twitter Sunday. He later followed up, writing, “It’s where you stand when the people you care about and admire do awful things that matters. Keeping head down and hoping it goes away? No.”

When the story broke early Monday, Bourdain took to Twitter again, tweeting, “It’s Batali. And it’s bad.”

“Top Chef” star Colicchio retweeted Bourdain’s tweet about Batali adding, “And no one should be surprised.”

Following the allegations, Batali released a statement to Eater, saying in part, “I apologize to the people I have mistreated and hurt. Although the identities of most of the individuals mentioned in these stories have not been revealed to me, much of the behavior described does, in fact, match up with ways I have acted. That behavior was wrong and there are no excuses. I take full responsibility and am deeply sorry for any pain, humiliation or discomfort I have caused to my peers, employees, customers, friends and family.”

What You Need To Know About Mario Batali