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Reports: 2 hospitalized after shooting at Virginia Motorsports Park

Published: Saturday, April 01, 2017 @ 10:29 PM
Updated: Sunday, April 02, 2017 @ 6:28 AM

Police siren
News | WHBQ
Police siren(News | WHBQ)

Two people were hospitalized after gunfire broke out at the second annual Spring Fest at the Virginia Motorsports Park in Dinwiddie County on Saturday, according to WTVR

>> Read more trending news

Initial reports said three people were shot in a “mass casualty” situation, according to WRIC. Authorities later said two were hospitalized with injuries that were not life-threatening, WTVR reported. A third person was injured by broken glass following the gunfire, WTVR reported.

The Spring Fest event is a motorcycle and car rally and race as well as concert with performers, including Lil Boosie.

Nude photos taken in Florida judge’s chambers lead to clerk’s arrest

Published: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 @ 11:20 PM

Closeup of gavel in court room
IPGGutenbergUKLtd/Getty Images/iStockphoto
Closeup of gavel in court room(IPGGutenbergUKLtd/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

A Florida clerk who allegedly took nude photos of his girlfriend in a judge’s chambers was arrested Monday on a petty theft charge, news reports stated.

>> Read more trending news

The twisted tale involves Jefferson County Clerk of Courts Kirk Reams, 40, and his ex-girlfriend Brittany McClellan, according to the Tallahassee Democrat
The two began dating in 2012, had a child together and broke up about a year later, the Tallahassee Democrat reported.
In 2013 and 2014, McClellan was arrested twice on domestic violence charges during fights with Reams, according to court records obtained by the Tallahassee Democrat. The two also went through a tumultuous custody battle for their child, the paper added. 

The saga continued into late 2016, when McClellan told the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office that while they were dating Reams took nude photos of her inside a circuit court judge’s chamber’s office. She also told them that McClellan let her borrow a government laptop, which she used for about a year, according to the Tallahassee Democrat. 

An investigation by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement’s Public Corruption Unit determined that the nude photos taken in 2013 did exist, but that McClellan did not do anything criminal, The Tallahassee Democrat reported. 

However, the state agency continued its investigation into the allegation of misuse of a government-owned laptop. She told officials that she used it to order supplies for her salon in Monticello, east of Tallahassee. 

Reams was charged Monday with misdemeanor petty theft and booked into jail. 

His attorney, David Collins of Monticello, said criminal charges should never have been filed and that the case should have been handled by the Florida Commission on Ethics. He said the latest event is essentially the result of an ex-girlfriend trying to smear Reams’ reputation.

“It appears that the government has gone to great lengths and costs to the taxpayer to prosecute a misdemeanor whose basis is that the clerk of court loaned an otherwise unused laptop and the clerk is the person who has authority to give permission to do such,” he told the Tallahassee Democrat. 

Read more at the Tallahassee Democrat

Molly Ringwald recounts sexual harassment, assault by 'the other Harvey Weinsteins'

Published: Thursday, October 19, 2017 @ 4:22 AM

Molly Ringwald (Photo by Rabbani and Solimene Photography/Getty Images)
Rabbani and Solimene Photography/Getty Images
Molly Ringwald (Photo by Rabbani and Solimene Photography/Getty Images)(Rabbani and Solimene Photography/Getty Images)

Molly Ringwald, an ’80s teen idol, opened up about being sexually assaulted by a director in Hollywood in a new op-ed published in The New Yorker.

>> Before Alyssa Milano, #MeToo began with activist Tarana Burke 10 years ago

In a piece titled “All the Other Harvey Weinsteins,” the “16 Candles” star described her own experience with sexual assault in Hollywood in the wake of the Weinstein scandal.

“I have had plenty of Harveys of my own over the years, enough to feel a sickening shock of recognition,” she wrote.

>> Carrie Fisher once sent producer a cow tongue after friend was allegedly assaulted

Harvey Weinstein Accused of Sexual Harassment

Ringwald said she was “lucky” that she did not “have to turn down giving or getting a massage” and “wasn’t cajoled into a taxi,” but her own experiences were still horrific. She recalled a disturbing encounter with a 50-year-old crew member when she was 13 and the time a married film director "stuck his tongue in (her) mouth" when she was 14.

>> Read more trending news

“At a time when I was trying to figure out what it meant to become a sexually viable young woman, at every turn some older guy tried to help speed up the process,” she wrote, adding that she was thankful for having protective parents growing up, but they couldn’t shield her from everything she experienced. “I shudder to think of what would have happened had I not had them.”

Ringwald said she never spoke about her experiences because “stories like these have never been taken seriously.”

Several leading ladies in Hollywood have recently opened up about experiencing sexual harassment and assault.

>> Reese Witherspoon discusses being sexually assaulted at age 16

Reese Witherspoon also revealed that she was once sexually assaulted by a director when she was 16 years old at the Elle Women in Hollywood event on Monday.

“[I feel] true disgust at the director who assaulted me when I was 16 years old and anger at the agents and the producers who made me feel that silence was a condition of my employment,” Witherspoon said. “I feel really, really encouraged that there will be a new normal. For the young women in this room, life is going to be different, because we’re with you, we have your back, and it makes me feel better. It makes me so sad to talk about these issues, but I would be remiss not to.”

What Is "Me Too" On Social Media?

Oklahoma police officer who shot, killed daughter's boyfriend found guilty of manslaughter

Published: Thursday, October 19, 2017 @ 1:12 AM

FILE - In this June 30, 2017 file photo, ex-Tulsa police officer Shannon Kepler, left, arrives with his legal team for afternoon testimony in his third trial in Tulsa, Okla. Jurors in the fourth murder trial for Kepler, a white former Oklahoma police officer, heard a 911 call Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017 where his daughter screams to dispatchers that her father had shot her 19-year-old black boyfriend. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
Sue Ogrocki/AP
FILE - In this June 30, 2017 file photo, ex-Tulsa police officer Shannon Kepler, left, arrives with his legal team for afternoon testimony in his third trial in Tulsa, Okla. Jurors in the fourth murder trial for Kepler, a white former Oklahoma police officer, heard a 911 call Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017 where his daughter screams to dispatchers that her father had shot her 19-year-old black boyfriend. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)(Sue Ogrocki/AP)

A jury has reached a verdict in the fourth murder trial of a former Tulsa, Oklahoma, police officer.

>> Watch the news report here

After more than five hours of deliberation, the jury found Shannon Kepler guilty of manslaughter in the 2014 killing of Jeremy Lake, his daughter's boyfriend, and recommended 15 years in prison.

>> Watch reaction from the courtroom here

Kepler Trial Update

VERDICT IN: The jury has returned a guilty of manslaughter verdict in the 4th trial of former Tulsa officer Shannon Kepler. http://bit.ly/2kYON6z

Posted by FOX23 News on Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Kepler is accused of killing Lake in 2014 while off duty.

Though he was charged with first-degree murder, the jury also considered the lesser charge of manslaughter in the heat of passion.

>> Read more trending news

Three previous trials ended in mistrial.

Some members of Lake's extended family traveled over an hour to be at the trial.

While the district attorney said evidence doesn't show that Kepler needed to use deadly force to defend himself, the defense claimed the state's evidence did not show that Kepler went to Lake's home with bad intentions.

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Before Alyssa Milano, #MeToo began with activist Tarana Burke 10 years ago

Published: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 @ 3:55 PM

Activist Tarana Burke created the Me Too movement over 10 years ago to  amplify the voices of survivors of sexual abuse, assault and exploitation, particularly women of color.
@strangebirdproductions
Activist Tarana Burke created the Me Too movement over 10 years ago to amplify the voices of survivors of sexual abuse, assault and exploitation, particularly women of color.(@strangebirdproductions)

In wake of mounting sexual harassment and assault allegations against film producer Harvey Weinstein, Alyssa Milano tweeted a call to victims to share their stories. 

“If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet,” the actress wrote on Sunday.

The hashtag spread far and wide, but Milano isn’t the originator of using the phrase to bring attention to these stories. That credit belongs to Tarana Burke, a New York-based sexual assault, abuse and exploitation activist.

>> Read more trending news

“It's not about a viral campaign for me,” Burke told CNN Tuesday. “It’s about a movement.”

CNN reported that Burke began the movement -- the genesis of which happened in 1996 -- when she was a youth camp director and heard a young girl’s story of abuse.

“For the next several minutes this child ... struggled to tell me about her ‘stepdaddy’ or rather her mother’s boyfriend who was doing all sorts of monstrous things to her developing body…” Burke wrote on the Just Be youth organization website. “I was horrified by her words, the emotions welling inside of me ran the gamut, and I listened until I literally could not take it anymore…which turned out to be less than 5 minutes. Then, right in the middle of her sharing her pain with me, I cut her off and immediately directed her to another female counselor who could ‘help her better...’

“I could not muster the energy to tell her that I understood, that I connected, that I could feel her pain,” she wrote, later adding, “I watched her put her mask back on and go back into the world like she was all alone and I couldn’t even bring myself to whisper…me too.”

Burke told CNN she began the movement to help young women of color who survived sexual exploitation, abuse and assault. 

“It started with young people and I quickly realized adults needed it too,” she said. “When you experience trauma and meet other people that have a similar experience, and you show empathy for each other, it creates a bond.”

As of Wednesday, #MeToo continues to be tweeted and shared on other social media spaces, including Facebook and Instagram. 

“Somebody asked me, does this (campaign) amplify your work? And it does in a certain way, but also when this hashtag dies down, and people thinking about it, I'll still be doing the work,” Burke told the Los Angeles Times on Monday

“I think the viral moment is great but the amplification of that -- I worry about disclosing their status as survivors en masse on social media and not having space to process,” she told CNN. “I worry about survivors coming on to social media and being bombarded with messages of ‘me too.”

What Is "Me Too" On Social Media?

By Monday, Milano tweeted that she was made aware of the origin of the movement. “(T)he origin story is equal parts heartbreaking and inspiring,” she wrote with a link to the Just Be website.

Before then, some were critical, Ebony magazine reported. To a number of women of color on Twitter, Milano’s elevation of #MeToo and the day-long Twitter boycott following Rose McGowan’s temporary account deactivation ignored the fact that black women and other women of color are excluded from conversations. 

“Where was the boycott when actress and comedian Leslie Jones was harassed by trolls to the point of deleting her account for months?” writer Ashley C. Ford wrote in a Refinery29 essay.

“I think that women of color use social media to make our voices heard with or without the amplification of White women,” Burke told Ebony. “I also think that many times when White women want our support, they use an umbrella of ‘women supporting women’ and forget that they didn’t lend the same kind of support.”

“I don’t think it was intentional but somehow sisters still managed to get diminished or erased in these situations,” she added. “A slew of people raised their voices so that that didn’t happen.”