Police: Man attacks worker at Florida massage parlor

Published: Monday, January 01, 2018 @ 6:40 AM

Eric Grenier
Orange County Jail
Eric Grenier(Orange County Jail)

A 30-year-old Orlando man attacked a worker Sunday evening at a massage parlor, the Ocoee Police Department said.

Eric Grenier walked into Herbal Spa & Massage on North Clarke Road near East Silver Star Road at about 8 p.m. and asked a woman about prices before saying he'd "be right back," Ocoee police Officer Loretta Moser said.

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"Shortly after, the male entered the spa a second time and stated he was ready," Moser said. "As the female turned to walk towards the back of the business, the male sprayed some form of chemical spray into the female employee's face causing her to scream and run out the front door."

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(Ocoee Police Department)

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The woman ran to a nearby pizzeria and Grenier ran in the opposite direction, so she returned to the spa when she didn't see him anymore, police said.

"The female employee entered the spa and walked towards the back of the business to wash her face," Moser said. "The male then re-entered the spa and approached the female employee from behind as he attempted to put some type of rope around her neck."

Investigators said the woman screamed, pushed Grenier away and escaped through a back door. They said he chased her but drove away when she asked for someone to call 911.

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Grenier was booked into the Orange County Jail on charges of aggravated assault and resisting an officer with violence.

The latter charge involves the Winter Garden Police Department, jail records said.

No details were given about Grenier's arrest. He's scheduled to face a judge at 11 a.m. Monday.

(Ocoee Police Department)

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Man with tattooed face wanted for climbing in unlocked window, assaulting woman

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 9:01 PM

Domestic assault suspect Michael Mann is wanted by Cincinnati authorities.
Crimestoppers Cincinnati
Domestic assault suspect Michael Mann is wanted by Cincinnati authorities.(Crimestoppers Cincinnati)

Ohio authorities are searching for a man with distinctive tattoos covering his face and neck, who is  accused of climbing through an unlocked window at a Cincinnati home and assaulting a woman.

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Michael Mann, 34, is wanted for aggravated burglary and domestic violence.

According to police reports, Mann entered the woman's Cincinnati home and slapped and choked her. Police said he has a history of domestic violence and drug charges.

The latest incident involving Mann and the victim, who he has a child with, happened on Jan. 9.

Police are asking for the public’s help in finding the suspect.

Clotilda: Last-known slave ship uncovered after East Coast ‘Bomb Cyclone’

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 1:23 PM

East Coast ‘Bomb Cyclone’ Uncovers Last Known Slave Ship, Clotilda

Years of research and a particularly strong winter storm has led a reporter in Alabama to what is likely the remains of the last ship to carry slave cargo from Africa to the United States.

Writer Ben Raines of al.com reported Tuesday that what is left of the slave ship Clotilda, “lies partially buried in mud alongside an island in the lower Mobile-Tensaw Delta, a few miles north of the city of Mobile. The hull is tipped to the port side, which appears almost completely buried in mud. The entire length of the starboard side, however, is almost fully exposed.”

The ship’s remains were discovered by Raines when the “Bomb Cyclone” winter system hit the eastern half of the country earlier this month. A confluence of strong systems created the storm that caused the tide in Mobile Bay to be especially low, Raines pointed out. The lower than normal tide better exposed what was left of the ship.

In the story, Raines says he documented the wreck with historical documents and photos – the remains rest in the Mobile-Tensaw Delta, accessible only by boat – and took his findings to a team of archaeologists from the University of West Florida in Pensacola, Fla.

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The archaeologists agreed that Raines had probably found what was left of the Clotilda.

In the summer of 1860, the Clotilda brought 110 men, women and children from Africa to Alabama in violation of U.S. laws that banned international slave trade. The ship’s trans-Atlantic journey was the last recorded trip bringing human cargo from an African nation to the United States.

The expedition was financed by Timothy Meaher, a wealthy Mobile businessman who made a bet that he could sneak slaves into the country past forts on either side of the entrance to Mobile Bay, “under the officers’ noses.” 

Meaher was able to hire a ship and captain to bring the slaves to Mobile, but fearing that he would be caught and punished for the stunt, Meaher arranged for the ship to be burned after he had the slaves unloaded.

Those 110 slaves who were brought over on the Clotilda were freed five years later at the end of the Civil War. They asked Meaher to pay for their return to Africa. He refused, and the group went on to petition the U.S. government for the money. When the government refused, the group took up residence near Mobile, creating the community of Africatown.

The town, according to historian Sylvianne Diouf in her book “Dreams of Africa in Alabama,” was run under traditional African law and used African farming and education methods. The last survivor of the Clotilda trip, Cudjoe Kazoola Lewis , died in 1935, though descendants of the slaves brought over on the ship still live in the area.

The story of the Clotilda was recently resurrected in an episode of the PBS series “Finding Your Roots,” hosted by historian Henry Gates. In a December episode, Roots front man and drummer Questlove – whose given name is Ahmir Thompson – finds out that his great, great, great grandfather, Charles Lewis, was one of the slaves brought to America on the Clotilda’s trip.

Gates tells Questlove that Meaher chose the more than 100 slaves from a group of 4,000 to be brought to Alabama. Lewis was one of those chosen.

"Think about the odds, man," Gates said.

Click here to read Raines’ full story on finding the Clotilda. 

 

Baby drowns, toddler injured in bathtub when woman walks away, police say

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 4:30 PM

A Nassau County Sheriff’s Office squad car is blocking a road that leads to a home in Fernandina Beach, Fla., Tuesday where one child died and another was injured in a bathtub incident. 
ActionNewsJax.com
A Nassau County Sheriff’s Office squad car is blocking a road that leads to a home in Fernandina Beach, Fla., Tuesday where one child died and another was injured in a bathtub incident. (ActionNewsJax.com)

A 14-month-old baby girl is dead and a 3-year-old girl is clinging to life after deputies said their mother put them in the bathtub and walked away.

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The incident happened Tuesday at a home in Fernandina Beach, Fla. Deputies arrived and started CPR immediately, authorities said.

They tried everything they could, but the 14-month-old girl didn't make it. The 3-year-old was taken to Baptist Medical Center Nassau in Fernandina Beach. 

Deputies quickly blocked off the road to begin an investigation. Deputies roped off the home with crime scene tape. 

Deputies say the 911 call came in around 1:20 p.m. Tuesday. The mother claimed she put the two kids in the bathtub and walked away, and when she came back, they were under water.

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Authorities say any possible charges will not come until their investigation is complete. 

Should adolescence last until age 24? A group of scientists think so

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 4:53 PM



Pixabay
(Pixabay)

Adolescence is thought to end at about age 18, but a group of scientists wants to extend it to 24, according to a new report. 

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Researchers from hospitals and research institutions in Australia recently conducted an experiment, published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, to determine the span of years that should define adolescence.

Traditionally, it is the period between childhood and adulthood, or generally from age 10 to 18. However, the researchers believe the biological and societal shifts over the last several decades indicate the need for an extension of adolescence. 

“Adolescence is the phase of life stretching between childhood and adulthood, and its definition has long posed a conundrum. Adolescence encompasses elements of biological growth and major social role transitions, both of which have changed in the past century,” they said.

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Young girls and boys develop earlier than previous generations, they noted. For example, many preteens begin menstruating at 10, while their parents and grandparents started at 14. 

They also pointed out that the adolescent brain does not stop developing until a person is in their 20s and that wisdom teeth now generally grow in at 25. 

Furthermore, young adults are getting married later in life. It’s more common for youth to settle down in their 30s as opposed to their 20s. And they’re leaving the nest later, too, which is expected by parents and society, they said. Analysts used the United States as an example, because insurance companies are now allowing adults to keep their kids on policies longer. 

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“Rather than age 10–19 years, a definition of 10–24 years corresponds more closely to adolescent growth and popular understandings of this life phase and would facilitate extended investments across a broader range of settings,” the authors wrote. 

Researchers believe the extension will encourage governments to better frame laws meant to protect youth and help young people on their journey through adulthood.

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