Police find 'maze game drawing' at James Holmes' apartment

Published: Thursday, October 24, 2013 @ 1:26 PM
Updated: Thursday, October 24, 2013 @ 1:26 PM

New information on the man accused of killing 12 people and injuring 70 others at a Colorado movie theater last year.

Colorado police say they believe James Holmes might have “role-played” a serial killer on the streets of Denver in a made-up “maze game” before the shooting took place. (Via CNN)

Police testified at a preliminary hearing Wednesday that, while searching Holmes’ apartment, they found “a spiral notebook with a drawing that depicted a serial killer navigating the maze in a section of Denver called DoLo, or Lower Downtown.” (Via NBC)

At this point it appears this fantasy was just acted out in drawings, not in reality. 

An FBI agent also gave testimony, saying an evidence team found a Batman mask and a calendar with the date of the massacre, July 20, 2012, marked “with a unique symbol." (Via New York Daily News)

According to Fox News, Holmes also sent a notebook full of violent drawings to a psychiatrist before the deadly rampage.

The pre trial was held to determine if those items and other evidence uncovered at Holmes’ apartment can be introduced at his trial.

Holmes’ lawyers are asking for that evidence to be thrown out. They say investigators searched his apartment without a search warrant, which would make any evidence obtained there unusable in court. (Via ITN)

But prosecutors argue authorities needed to enter the apartment immediately to clear it of any explosives or traps Holmes might have set up. 

Police say they used a bomb robot to knock down Holmes’ apartment door the morning after the attack. And through the robot’s camera, authorities reported they saw fireworks shells, wires, ignition boxes, and a trip wire. (Via The Denver Post)

The judge has not said when he will make his decision on the motions made in the preliminary hearing. 

Holmes is scheduled to go on trial in February for allegedly firing a semiautomatic rifle into a crowd of people attending the midnight screening of “The Dark Knight Rises.” (Via ABC)

- See more at newsy.com.  

Congress already squeezed by its 2017 calendar

Published: Monday, May 29, 2017 @ 9:02 PM
Updated: Monday, May 29, 2017 @ 9:02 PM

While the calendar says we are days away from the month of June, Republicans in Congress are already feeling pressure over their legislative agenda for 2017, as time is already growing short for GOP efforts to overhaul the Obama health law, which also puts a time squeeze on other major initiatives on Capitol Hill.

There are no votes scheduled this week in the Congress; the Senate returns to legislative session on June 5, while the House is back in Washington, D.C. on June 6.

Here’s some of what faces Republicans in the Congress:

1. Everything keys off of the GOP health care bill. Because the GOP is trying to use the expedited “budget reconciliation” process, which allows them to avoid a filibuster in the Senate, nothing involved with next year’s budget – or with tax reform – can move until health care is settled. GOP Senators have been meeting regularly in recent weeks to decide what to do on health care – but they don’t have a deal as yet, and no one is quiet sure when they might have a vote. “We’re a long ways from that,” said Sen. Mike Rounds (R-ND) told reporters this week. “Damned if I know,” Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) said about when a deal might be reached. Writing their own bill takes time.

2. Why do you keep saying there isn’t much time? Two things are at work here – the Congressional calendar, and the limits on the “budget reconciliation” process. The authorization to use reconciliation for a health care bill expires on September 30 – the end of the 2017 Fiscal Year. So, the GOP has four months to figure out a bill, and get it approved and sent to the President. But, lawmakers won’t be here much of that four month period. In fact, between now and the end of the fiscal year – there are 43 scheduled legislative work days in the House, which mirrors the Senate schedule. That’s 43 legislative days in session spread out over 18 weeks. You could always get extra time by scrapping the August recess, or working some weekends.

3. The budget is way behind schedule – more than usual. This past week, President Trump delivered his 2018 budget to the Congress. Normally that is done in February. The House and Senate only started having hearings on spending bills this past week. Lawmakers were supposed to approve the blueprint known as the “budget resolution” by April 15. As of now, that plan doesn’t even exist. Congress is supposed to pass all spending bills by October 1, the start of the new fiscal year, but that has not happened since 1996. With the schedule still showing five weeks off during the summer, there is no way that lawmakers are going to meet that spending deadline, which will pave the way for stop gap budgets, and then most likely a year-end omnibus spending deal. Sound familiar?

4. Tax reform still hasn’t taken shape. Despite the Sunday tweet by President Trump about his tax plans, it was obvious in budget hearings last week involving Secretary of Treasury Stephen Mnuchin that a Trump tax plan is not ready to be rolled out any time soon. Remember – all we have right now is a one page document with some bullet points. Even if the White House put out the details this next week, Republicans couldn’t take it up under budget reconciliation rules until they get finished with health care legislation. And, as stated above, the GOP does not seem to be near a deal. Senate Republicans probably cannot let June go by without some kind of agreement on health care.

5. You can’t pass bills when you aren’t in DC. Whenever I point out how the Congress is going to be home for an extended break, I always hear from people who say, “If they’re not in DC, they can’t screw things up.” Yes, that’s true. On the other hand, it’s also true that when they aren’t working on Capitol Hill, they can’t pass any bills to fix things, either. And for Republicans right now, if you aren’t at work on the floors of the House and Senate, you aren’t passing any of President Trump’s agenda. Those Republican lawmakers having town hall meetings this week will get a lot of attention.

It’s not even the end of May. But time is already running short for Republicans in 2017.

Related

Navy SEAL falls to death in Hudson River after parachute failure

Published: Monday, May 29, 2017 @ 5:51 PM

In this Sunday, May 28, 2017 photo, the U.S. Coast Guard rescues a U.S. Navy SEAL who fell into the Hudson River after his parachute failed to open during a Fleet Week demonstration over the river in Jersey City, N.J. The Navy said the parachutist was pronounced dead at Jersey City Medical Center. 
Joe Shine/AP

 

An investigation is underway into the tragic death of a Navy SEAL in a parachuting accident Sunday during a demonstration for Fleet Week in Jersey City, New Jersey, across the Hudson River from Manhattan.

>> Read more trending news

The SEAL, part of the Navy’s elite skydiving team, the Leap Frogs, plunged to his death in the river when his chute failed to open, according to a Navy spokesperson.

The SEAL was immediately rescued from the water, but later pronounced dead at Jersey City Medical Center, the Navy said in a statement.

The parachutist was not identified pending notification of his family.

“Our hearts and prayers go out to his family, and I ask for all your prayers for the Navy SEAL community who lost a true patriot today,” Navy Rear Adm. Jack Scorby said, according to The Associated Press

The Leap Frogs have numerous performances scheduled throughout the rest of the year, according to their website.

President Trump observes Memorial Day with somber service at Arlington

Published: Monday, May 29, 2017 @ 2:46 PM

President Donald Trump participates in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery on Memorial Day, May 29, 2017 in Arlington, Virginia. 
Pool/Getty Images

President Donald Trump marked his first Memorial Day in office with a somber service at Arlington National Cemetery on Monday.

>> Read more trending news

The president first participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, before addressing a crowd of family members of the fallen gathered there to remember those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for their country.

In his speech, the president recognized the Gold Star families at the service.

"To every Gold Star family: God is with you, and your loved ones are with him." Trump said. 

"I believe that God has a special place in heaven for those who laid down their lives so that others may live free."

Trump, along with Vice President Mike Pence, who was also at the service, visited Section 60, where the military members who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan since 9/11 are buried chatting and shaking hands with the families of the fallen.

The president took to Twitter this morning, posting several tweets about Memorial Day. 

“Today we remember the men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice in serving,” he wrote early Monday before heading over to Arlington for the somber remembrance ceremony.

“Honoring the men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice in service to America. Home of the free, because of the brave,” he tweeted even earlier Monday morning.

>> Related: Trump approval rating hits new low in poll

Also Monday, Pence and his wife, Second Lady Karen Pence, helped kick off a bike race in Washington for Project Hero, a veterans and first responders group, according to CNN.

 

Denver sportswriter fired after tweet about Indy 500 winner

Published: Monday, May 29, 2017 @ 3:14 AM
Updated: Monday, May 29, 2017 @ 5:23 PM

Takuma Sato of Japan celebrates after winning the 101st Indianapolis 500 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway on  Sunday. He  became the first Japanese driver to win the race at the iconic Brickyard.
Chris Graythen/Getty Images

A Denver sportswriter has been fired from his job for an insensitive tweet about the winner of the Indianapolis 500 being from Japan.

>> Read more trending news 

Terry Frei of the Denver Post tweeted that he was “very uncomfortable with a Japanese driver winning the Indianapolis 500 during Memorial Day weekend,” the New York Post reported.

Frei’s tweet came shortly after former Formula One driver Takuma Sato captured Sunday’s race at the Brickyard, becoming the first Japanese winner in the race’s history. 

 The tweet caused an immediate backlash on social media, with some Twitter users criticizing his post as insensitive.

Frei later deleted his tweet and apologized.

“I fouled up. I’m sorry. I shouldn’t have said what I said when I said it. I should have known better and I regret it,” he tweeted.

The apology may have came too late, however. The Denver Post issued a statement on Frei Monday saying that he had been fired:

We apologize for the disrespectful and unacceptable tweet that was sent by one of our reporters. Terry Frei is no longer an employee of The Denver Post. It’s our policy not to comment further on personnel issues.

The tweet doesn’t represent what we believe nor what we stand for. We hope you will accept our profound apologies.