NASA to honor Armstrong at National Cathedral

Published: Thursday, September 13, 2012 @ 9:17 AM
Updated: Thursday, September 13, 2012 @ 9:17 AM

Dignitaries, community and political leaders, members of the Armstrong family and members of the NASA family, including current and former astronauts, will pay respects to Neil Armstrong  in a memorial held at the  Washington National Cathedral today. The Ohio native and  the first man to walk on the moon died Aug. 25. The memorial will start at 10 a.m. EST and be broadcast live on NASA Television and streamed online by the agency's and National Cathedral's websites, according to a realease by NASA.

Armstrong has a history at the Cathedral. He, along with fellow astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, presented the National Cathedral with a moon rock brought back during their Apollo 11 mission. The presentation took place in a July 21, 1974 service commemorating the fifth anniversary of the first lunar landing. The iconic Space Window that later would display the sliver of lunar rock also was dedicated at that service.

Information provided by NASA.

Steve Bannon out as White House strategist

Published: Friday, August 18, 2017 @ 12:48 PM
Updated: Friday, August 18, 2017 @ 6:37 PM

Steve Bannon Removed as White House Chief Strategist

Almost exactly one year after Steve Bannon left his position as executive chair of the conservative website Breitbart News in favor of joining Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign, the 63-year-old is leaving the White House.

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The White House confirmed in a statement that Friday would be Bannon’s last day as part of the administration.

Who is Steve Bannon?

Man warns ‘don’t take a chance with your eyes’ after eclipse-watching burned a hole in his retina

Published: Friday, August 18, 2017 @ 6:15 PM

How To Safely Watch A Solar Eclipse

If you’re thinking of watching the solar eclipse without the necessary eye gear, think again. One 71-year-old man is issuing a warning after burning one of his eyes more than 50 years ago.

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In 1962, Lou Tomososki was excited to witness the eclipse after learning about it from his science teacher. 

That afternoon, he stood outside, and looked up with just his right eye. As the moon moved over the sun, he was fascinated. But he didn’t fully realize his eyes were suffering. 

>> RELATED: Your eyes will fry under normal sunglasses during 2017 eclipse, here’s why

"There's no sign," he told InsideEdition.com. "You just squint. You don't feel anything."

On the walk home, he remembered a “little bit of a blurry spot.” But it wasn’t until months later that he found out he’d burned a hole in his retina during an eye doctor appointment. He now has a pinpoint of blindness in one eye.
>> RELATED: What time does the solar eclipse start; how long does it last; glasses; how to view it

"The damage was done right then and there,” he said. “The sun is 93 million miles away and look what it can do.”

That’s why he’s doing all he can to spread the message about eye safety for the upcoming celestial event, which will occur on Monday.

According to NASA, during a solar eclipse, you should not look directly at the sun without protection except during the brief totality time.

 The only safe way to view the partially eclipsed (or un-eclipsed) sun directly is to wear NASA-approved eclipse glasses or handheld solar viewers. Only select manufacturers have certified that their products meet the ISO 12312-2 international standard for eye and face protection.
>> RELATED: Can’t find eclipse glasses anywhere? Make these DIY pinhole cameras, projectors instead

You can snag some online or for free at a few businesses around the area. After all, Tomososki said, "Why would you take a chance with your eyes?"

(Getty File Photo)(bruev/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Florida hunters capture 12-foot gator days after 11-foot catch

Published: Friday, August 18, 2017 @ 6:03 PM

Florida hunters caught an 11-foot, 375-pound gator after a three-hour fight. (Photo: Allen Eyestone/The Palm Beach Post)
Florida hunters caught an 11-foot, 375-pound gator after a three-hour fight. (Photo: Allen Eyestone/The Palm Beach Post)

Four Florida hunters struggled to take down an 11-foot, 375-pound gator after a three-hour fight.

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Nick Naylor, John Booker, Kenny Way and Casey Shields began battling the massive gator beginning late Tuesday night and ended up with it under their control by Wednesday morning, according to the Pensacola News Journal.

They used a 40-pound test from a spinning reel to capture the animal, which was hanging out in the waters of Blackwater Bay below Interstate 10.

Then Thursday, the hunters snared a 12-foot 6-inch alligator in the same waters. This time it took them two hours to reel it in, according to the Tampa Bay Times.

Hunters are prohibited from using baited hooks, firearms or bang sticks when hunting gators. Each hunter is allowed to take two non-hatchling alligators.

Alligator hunting season in Florida began Tuesday. It was established in 1988 partially to help control the state’s 1.3 million alligator population, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission.

The state’s guide reads: “These special night hunts provide a thrilling, hands-on hunting adventure. Also, alligator meat is a delicious and healthy choice and the hide can be tanned and made into leather products.” 

Boy, 2, chokes to death on grape at grocery store

Published: Friday, August 18, 2017 @ 4:50 PM

File photo.  (Photo by Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images)
Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images
File photo. (Photo by Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images)(Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images)

A toddler choked to death on a grape at a grocery store after his mother was unable to perform CPR.

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Mother Emma Carver did not notice her son Ayyan Umar, 2, had eaten some grapes until she heard him making choking sounds last week.

“I started banging on him,” mother Emma Carver told WXYZ. “But it wasn't getting it out, so it had to be lodged.”

One shopper called 911 while another tried CPR. Emergency responders were on scene about five to seven minutes later and were able to remove one grape. Another grape was removed at the hospital.

Carver and the father, Mohammad Umar, have signed up for a first aid class. They encourage other parents to learn the life-saving skills, too.

“I was feeling like maybe it was a bad dream, maybe somebody gonna wake me up,” Umar said. “He sleeps on my chest. I see him everywhere.”