NASA to honor Armstrong at National Cathedral

Published: Thursday, September 13, 2012 @ 9:17 AM
Updated: Thursday, September 13, 2012 @ 9:17 AM

Dignitaries, community and political leaders, members of the Armstrong family and members of the NASA family, including current and former astronauts, will pay respects to Neil Armstrong  in a memorial held at the  Washington National Cathedral today. The Ohio native and  the first man to walk on the moon died Aug. 25. The memorial will start at 10 a.m. EST and be broadcast live on NASA Television and streamed online by the agency's and National Cathedral's websites, according to a realease by NASA.

Armstrong has a history at the Cathedral. He, along with fellow astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, presented the National Cathedral with a moon rock brought back during their Apollo 11 mission. The presentation took place in a July 21, 1974 service commemorating the fifth anniversary of the first lunar landing. The iconic Space Window that later would display the sliver of lunar rock also was dedicated at that service.

Information provided by NASA.

New York woman shot by hunter who mistook her for deer

Published: Friday, November 24, 2017 @ 9:37 PM

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)(Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

A New York woman is dead after she was shot by a hunter who mistook her for a deer while she was walking her dogs on Wednesday evening.

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Rosemary Billquist, 43, lived near the border of New York and Pennsylvania and was shot just before 5:30 p.m. The shooter, identified as 34-year-old Thomas Jadlowski, heard her scream and ran to her. He applied pressure to the wound and called 911, The Buffalo News reports. Billquist was shot roughly 100 yards from her home.

Authorities say that the shooting occurred after sunset, noting that it’s illegal to hunt at night in the state of Pennsylvania. Her husband, Jamie Billquist, told The Buffalo News that “they tried saving her [but] it was just too bad … It’s horrific. It will be with me the rest of my life.” He added, “She was always out to help somebody. She never wanted credit and was always quiet about it. She’s just an angel. An angel for sure.”

Officials say that Jadlowski is cooperating with their investigation and that no charges have been filed yet.

Rosemary Billquist was rushed to a University of Pittsburgh Medical Center hospital in Erie, Pennsylvania where personnel were unable to save her. Jamie was watching TV when an ambulance pulled into his driveway and a paramedic that he knew told him “we’ve got a gunshot wound,” and they ran to the field. Her husband rode with her to the hospital.

Jamie recalled his wife as an avid athlete with a zest for life, estimating that she ran over 60 marathons. He says that he knows the Jadlowski family but said simply, “It’s a two-second decision that he’ll regret for the rest of his life.”

If authorities do decide to press charges, Jadlowski will likely face involuntary manslaughter, which is defined in the Pennsylvania Penal Code as follows:

A person is guilty of involuntary manslaughter when as a direct result of the doing of an unlawful act in a reckless or grossly negligent manner, or the doing of a lawful act in a reckless or grossly negligent manner, he causes the death of another person.

Involuntary manslaughter is a first-degree misdemeanor and carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison.

Macy's credit card machines go down on Black Friday

Published: Friday, November 24, 2017 @ 9:55 PM

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 23:  People shop at Macy's department store on
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 23: People shop at Macy's department store on "Black Friday" on November 23, 2017 in New York City. Black Friday starts earlier in the season on Thanksgiving Day instead of the Friday after. (Photo by Stephanie Keith/Getty Images)(Stephanie Keith/Getty Images)

When the credit card machines went down at Macy’s on Black Friday, chaos was inevitable. In recent years, the day after Thanksgiving has become known not for the deals, but for the fights that ensue when shoppers rush for those deals.

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The machines seemed to be down all over the nation, and angry shoppers flooded Twitter with their complaints as Macy’s worked to get its systems running again.

It’s a particularly tough break for Macy’s, which is almost the unofficial retail sponsor of the holidays. It’s Thanksgiving Day parade has been a staple for generations, and every American of a certain age remembers watching “Miracle on 34th Street” in which Kris Kringle fills in for a drunken Santa at a Macy’s in Manhattan.

In a statement to NBC, the company said, “It is taking longer than usual to process some credit and gift cards in our stores, but we had added additional associates to the floor who are working to resolve the issue as quickly as possible.” The news outlet reported problems in Washington, D.C.; Reno, Nevada; Chicago; New York City, Richmond, Virginia; San Diego; and across New Jersey.

The company eventually took to social media in hopes of calming the tempers of some customers, asking them to send direct messages.

CNN Money notes that Macy’s stock could have really used the boost from a blockbuster Black Friday; their revenue dropped 6.1 percent in the last quarter, which marks the 11th straight quarter in which they’ve experienced declines. A lot of that decline is probably due to customers moving online for shopping, but unreliable credit card machines definitely won’t help their image.

This Black Friday has been no less eventful than those in previous years. Early in the morning, a brawl broke out in an Alabama store that caused the entire mall to shut down. Even more absurdly, four grown men were caught on video fighting over a toy car at Walmart.

But, like always, the holiday has been a success for retailers, with TechCrunch reporting $640 million in sales at 7 a.m. on the West Coast. Unsurprisingly, a lot of that money changed hands online, and a large portion of transactions even occurred via mobile devices. Which means that while shoppers may have hit the brick-and-mortar stores, they were still buying on the web. Early estimates showed that sales were up over 18 percent from 2016, so with any luck, retailers made out big -- even though a few Macy’s locations are probably very, very disappointed.

Thanksgiving dinner mix-up now a tradition with grandma who accidentally invited teen

Published: Friday, November 24, 2017 @ 7:26 PM
Updated: Friday, November 24, 2017 @ 7:26 PM

Thanksgiving - By the Numbers

Phoenix teenager Jamal Hinton and grandmother Wanda Hence have turned their internet fame from 2016 into a tradition.

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Last year, Hence thought she was texting her grandson to invite him to dinner in a group text, but she was actually texting Jamal Hinton, 17.

Hinton asked who was texting him and was told it was his grandmother.

“I really thought it was my grandma, so I had to ask for a picture to make sure,” Hinton told BuzzFeed.

The result was a selfie exchange from Hence to which Hinton replied, "You're not my grandma!"

(Getty file photo)(Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF)

But Hinton asked if he could still get a plate of food despite the mistake. Hence replied, “Of course you can. That's what grandmas do ... feed everyone."

KNXV reported that Hinton joined Hence’s family for dinner and is now her "honorary grandson."

When Hinton arrived and shook Hence’s hand, the two soon embraced for a hug.

"I'd never seen her before and she welcomed me into her home," Hinton told KNXV. "That shows me how great of a person she is. I'm thankful for people like that."

"He always has an open invite to our house for Thanksgiving," Hence told WVEC Friday.

  

Native Americans mark Thanksgiving with day of mourning

Published: Friday, November 24, 2017 @ 11:43 AM

Juan Gonzalez of Boston rekindles a small fire with“ the smoke symbolizing a ritual for healing and a connection with the
Juan Gonzalez of Boston rekindles a small fire with“ the smoke symbolizing a ritual for healing and a connection with the "creator." He has been attending this day of mourning for 30 years. "We feel the pain of the Wampanoag," said Gonzalez. United American Indians of New England gather for the National Day of Mourning across from Plymouth Rock in Plymouth, MA on Thursday, November 25, 2010. The day signifies the deaths of American Indians at the hands of early settlers and colonists and the independence of American Indians. (Photo by Yoon S. Byun/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)(Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Members of Native American tribes from around New England gathered Thursday in Plymouth, Massachusetts, the town where the Pilgrims settled, for a solemn observance of National Day of Mourning.

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Thursday's gathering served to acknowledge and remember the disease, racism and oppression that European settlers brought.

This year was the 48th year that the United American Indians of New England organized the event on Thanksgiving Day.

Moonanum James, a co-leader of the group, said native people have no reason to celebrate the arrival of the Pilgrims in 1620.

"We say, 'no thanks, no giving,'" he said.

Along with prayers and public speeches, participants condemned environmental degradation and government restrictions on immigration. They also planned a "stomp dance" to symbolically stomp out opioid addiction, which has ravaged many native communities.