Michael Flynn resigns: 5 things to know

Published: Tuesday, February 14, 2017 @ 4:47 AM
Updated: Tuesday, February 14, 2017 @ 4:47 AM

National Security Adviser Michael Flynn Resigns

Michael Flynn, President Donald Trump's national security adviser, resigned late Monday as controversy swirled around his phone calls with Russia's ambassador to the United States.

Here's what we know so far:

1. The background: According to The Washington Post, Flynn "privately discussed U.S. sanctions against Russia" with Ambassador Sergey Kislyak in December while President Barack Obama was still in office, then later misled Trump administration officials – including Vice President Mike Pence – about the conversations. As late as last week, Flynn denied talking to the ambassador about sanctions, but walked back that claim Thursday when a spokesman told the Post that Flynn "couldn't be certain that the topic never came up." A transcript of Flynn's call with Kislyak revealed that the two had spoken about sanctions, The New York Times reported.

>> National Security Adviser Michael Flynn resigns

2. The resignation: The White House released Flynn's resignation letter Monday night. In the letter, Flynn said he "inadvertently briefed the vice president-elect and others with incomplete information regarding (his) phone calls with the Russian ambassador." He added that he has "sincerely apologized to the president and the vice president, and they have accepted my apology."

>> See the letter here


>> Read: Flynn cites calls with Russian ambassador in resignation letter

3. The warning: The Post reported Monday that former acting Attorney General Sally Yates, who was fired last month after she ordered Justice Department lawyers to stop defending the president's travel ban, told the Trump administration in January that Flynn "was potentially vulnerable to Russian blackmail" over his conversations with the ambassador. 

>> Sally Yates reportedly warned White House that Flynn was ripe for Russian blackmail

4. The temporary replacement: Retired Lt. Gen. Joseph Keith Kellogg, who served in the U.S. Army from 1967 to 2003, reportedly has been named acting national security adviser.

>> Read more trending news

5. What's next? Trump must decide on a permanent replacement for Flynn. According to The Associated Press, the top contenders are Kellogg; former CIA director David Petraeus, the retired four-star general who stepped down after sharing classified information with his biographer-turned-mistress; and retired Vice Admiral Robert Harward, a former deputy commander of U.S. Central Command and member of the National Security Council under President George W. Bush. The Times reported that Harward "is the leading candidate."

>>RELATED: Timeline of events, who will replace him? 

– The Associated Press contributed to this report.

2018 SAG Awards: Gary Oldman, Frances McDormand, complete list of winners

Published: Sunday, January 21, 2018 @ 8:18 PM

LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 21:  Statue of the Screen Actors Guild Actor is seen at the 24th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Auditorium on January 21, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. 27522_009  (Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for Turner Image)
Dimitrios Kambouris
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 21: Statue of the Screen Actors Guild Actor is seen at the 24th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Auditorium on January 21, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. 27522_009 (Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for Turner Image)(Dimitrios Kambouris)

Hollywood stars honored television and cinematic performances at the 24th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards Sunday. 

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Still no deal to end shutdown as Senate delays next vote until Monday

Published: Sunday, January 21, 2018 @ 4:43 PM

Lawmakers in Congress on Sunday failed to reach a deal on plan to fund the federal government, meaning the work week will being with furloughs for hundreds of thousands of federal workers across the nation, but there was a hint of progress as a Senate vote on a temporary funding measure was delayed until noon on Monday, with Republican leaders offering a plan which would guarantee a Senate debate on immigration matters in February, in hopes that Democrats would then help to fund the government in the meantime.

“Let’s step back from the brink,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said on the Senate floor late on Sunday evening, as he urged Democrats to allow the government to re-open, and continue negotiations on a host of issues, including immigration.

“The shutdown should stop today,” McConnell added.

McConnell outlined a plan to fund operations of the government through February 8, and said that if by that date no agreement had been reached on how to deal with DACA and illegal immigrant “Dreamers” in the United States, then he would agree to bring the issue up on the Senate floor for debate and votes.

That immediately won the support of two Republicans who have been trying to broker a deal on the issue.

“The Senate should act like the Senate,” said Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ), who endorsed the idea of regular order on the Senate floor on immigration.

“This is more than a reasonable proposal by the Majority Leader,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), who spent much of the last three days shuttling between McConnell, Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer, and a host of Senators in both parties, in search of common ground.

“It would be my intention to resolve these issues as soon as possible, so we can move on to other issues important to our country,” McConnell added.

But Senate Democrats were not ready to accept, as Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer objected to McConnell’s attempt to hold a vote Sunday night on the plan for a temporary budget that would last until February 8, which is just 18 days away.

Still – Senate observers saw that as a positive, as neither McConnell nor Schumer engaged in any scorched earth exchanges, unlike earlier in the day. To some, that may mean a deal is in the works.

Originally, the Senate was to have voted at 1 am on Monday morning, but that vote was delayed until noon, as Republicans hope Democrats will re-think their opposition, and allow a funding measure to go through the Congress.

Former Disney star Orlando Brown arrested after family disturbance, police say

Published: Sunday, January 21, 2018 @ 7:11 PM

Orlando Brown. (Photo: Barstow Police Department)
Orlando Brown. (Photo: Barstow Police Department)

Former Disney Channel star Orlando Brown was recently arrested following what authorities say was a violent altercation at an apartment in California.

>> Read more trending news

The 30-year-old “That’s So Raven” actor was reportedly engaged in a dispute with his girlfriend and his girlfriend’s mother when an officer from the Barstow Police Department arrived on the scene at around 8 a.m. Thursday.

The officer realized there were active arrest warrants on Brown and his girlfriend’s mother, so they were both arrested and booked into the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department Barstow Jail, according to a police press release.

Brown’s bail was set at $25,000.

He previously served time in 2013 after failing to complete court-ordered alcohol education classes in connection with a previous DUI arrest.

John Coleman, The Weather Channel founder, dead at 83

Published: Sunday, January 21, 2018 @ 5:39 PM

CORRECTS THAT COLEMAN IS AT RIGHT, NOT LEFT - In this July 30, 1981 photo,  John Coleman, weather channel founder, right, and Frank Batten, publisher of the Norfolk, Va., Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Star, and chairman and chief executive of Landmark Communications, Inc., are seen during a news conference in New York. John Coleman, the founder of The Weather Channel and longtime KUSI weatherman, died Saturdaty night, Jan. 20, 2018, at home in Las Vegas, said his wife Linda Coleman. He was 83.  (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler, File)
Marty Lederhandler/AP
CORRECTS THAT COLEMAN IS AT RIGHT, NOT LEFT - In this July 30, 1981 photo, John Coleman, weather channel founder, right, and Frank Batten, publisher of the Norfolk, Va., Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Star, and chairman and chief executive of Landmark Communications, Inc., are seen during a news conference in New York. John Coleman, the founder of The Weather Channel and longtime KUSI weatherman, died Saturdaty night, Jan. 20, 2018, at home in Las Vegas, said his wife Linda Coleman. He was 83. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler, File)(Marty Lederhandler/AP)

John Coleman, who helped found and develop The Weather Channel, died Saturday at his home in Las Vegas. He was 83.

>> Read more trending news

Coleman, a longtime weatherman, innovated the position when he started at Good Morning America, according to the Washington Post. 

Coleman started The Weather Channel in 1981 with Joseph D’Aleo. Coleman left the network and continued forecasting on stations in New York and Chicago. He last worked in San Diego until he retired in 2014, according to the Washington Post

The Associated Press contributed to this report.