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Illinois couple welcomes 100th grandchild

Published: Wednesday, May 27, 2015 @ 8:38 AM
Updated: Wednesday, May 27, 2015 @ 8:38 AM

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Whoa, baby! A couple from Quincy, Illinois, is celebrating the birth of their 100th grandchild.

According to WGN, Leo and Ruth Zanger – who have been married 59 years and have 12 children – have 53 grandchildren, 46 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.

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Their 46th great-grandchild, Jaxton Zanger, was born April 8, bringing the total to 100.

"The good Lord has just kept sending them," Leo Zanger told the Herald-Whig. "We could start our own town."

Police: Maine man punches himself in face to avoid sobriety test 

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 11:17 AM

Brian Fogg was arrested on Jan. 13.
Waldo County Jail.
Brian Fogg was arrested on Jan. 13.(Waldo County Jail.)

Police have accused a Maine man of punching himself several times in the face to avoid a Breathalyzer test, The Bangor Daily News reported.

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Police suspected Brian Fogg, 27, of Belfast, to be intoxicated when they were called to a residence on Jan. 13 and found Fogg’s vehicle stuck in a ditch, police said. Belfast police said Fogg and a homeowner had gotten into an argument, and Fogg allegedly struck and dented the homeowner’s car.

After Fogg failed a sobriety test, police took him to jail and attempted to give him a Breathalyzer test, the Daily News reported.

As officers were explaining the testing process, Fogg allegedly punched himself in the face several times, the Daily News reported.

Belfast Detective Sgt. Gerry Lincoln said that Fogg “took that option (punching himself), which wasn’t one of the ones we gave to him.” 

He added that because people had option of declining to take a Breathalzyer test, it was unusual for someone to injure himself to avoid it.“We took that as a refusal to take the test,” Lincoln told the Daily News.

Fogg was charged with operating under the influence anyway, in addition to criminal mischief and falsifying physical evidence. He was released on bail, police said.

NFL championship games 2018: What time, what channel, odds for Jags vs. Patriots and Vikings vs. Eagles

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 11:15 AM

The Most Memorable Super Bowl Halftime Performances

We are one day out from “Championship Sunday,” where the teams who will play in the Super Bowl will be determined.
The Minnesota Vikings will take on the Philadelphia Eagles for the NFC Championship, while the New England Patriots play the Jacksonville Jaguars for the AFC title.

If the Vikings win, they will be the first team to ever play in the Super Bowl at their home stadium. If Philadelphia wins, it will be the first time in the team’s history.

If New England wins the AFC Conference championship, no one will be surprised. It will be the Pats 10th trip to the big game. If the Jaguars win, a lot of people will be surprised – New England is currently favored by 7.5 points.

Here’s a look at what time the games kickoff on Sunday, what channel, where they are livestreamed and the latest odds.

The AFC Championship Game

Jacksonville (12-6) at New England (14-3)

What time: 3:05 p.m. ET

What channel: CBS will broadcast the game

Where: Gillette Stadium, Foxborough, Mass.

LivestreamCBSSports.com According to CBS, “you can stream via desktop, the CBS Sports App on iOS and Android tablets as well as on Roku, Apple TV, tvOS, Amazon Fire TV, Xbox One, Chromecast and Windows 10 devices.”

Weather at game time via NFLWeather: 42 degrees, skies overcast;  with winds west at 2 mph 

Line: New England -7.5

The NFC Championship Game

Minnesota (14-3) at Philadelphia (14-3)

What time: 6:40 p.m. ET

What channel: Fox is broadcasting the game

Where: Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia, Penn.

LivestreamFox Sports Go

Weather at game time via NFLWeather: 44 degrees, skies overcast, with winds SSW at 3 mph

Line: Minnesota -3 

Super Bowl LII

When: Sunday, Feb. 4, 2018

Who: The winners of the two championship games

Where: U.S. Bank Stadium, Minneapolis, Minn.

Halftime entertainer: Justin Timberlake will headline the Pepsi Super Bowl LII Halftime Show

What time: 6:30 p.m. ET 

What channel: NBC will broadcast the game 

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady warms up during an NFL football practice, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018, in Foxborough, Mass. The Patriots host the Jacksonville Jaguars in the AFC championship on Sunday in Foxborough.(AP Photo/Bill Sikes)

Congress at work on a Saturday as lawmakers try to end shutdown quickly

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 5:18 AM

Hours after funding lapsed for the federal government at midnight, lawmakers in both parties returned for an unusual Saturday session of the House and Senate, as both parties quickly launched themselves into finger pointing over who is to blame for the first government shutdown since 2013, with few signs that a deal was near on the major spending and immigration issues that brought about the standoff.

“Get it together,” House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi bluntly said to Republicans in a morning speech on the House floor, as she led a chorus from her party in blaming the President for the budgetary impasse.

“The Trump travesty continues, as it has for the last twelve months,” said Pelosi’s top lieutenant, Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-MD).

But Republicans were having none of that.

“We’re about nine hours into the Schumer shutdown,” said Rep. Greg LaMalfa (R-CA) as the House convened, “which is basically Senate Democrats holding the United States, 320 million people, hostage.”

“There is no excuse for this,” said Rep. Keith Rothfus (R-PA).

“Democrats shut down the govt to protect illegals this week,” said Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA).

Behind the scenes, lawmakers in both parties were still hoping to cut a deal that would have the government fully open by Monday – but there was little evidence of a possible breakthrough on the broader budget and immigration issues which led to this stalemate.

Negotiations have centered on reaching a two year agreement on spending levels for the budget – as President Trump wants a sizable increase in the military’s budget – and on DACA, where Democrats were still hoping to get an agreement that would protect some 700,000 illegal immigrant “Dreamers” from being deported.

As the clock ticked toward midnight on Friday night, there were a flurry of talks on the Senate floor between Senators of both parties – not really about the specifics of the budget or DACA – but mainly about the length of any temporary funding plan for the government, and plans to vote on that hot button immigration topic.

“Since there were discussions here in earnest, in a bipartisan way, we ought to give those discussions a chance to bear fruit,” said Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL).

“We should stay and work,” said Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH). “Senator McConnell chose to shut the government down,” referring to the GOP leader in the Senate.

But the underlying issues remain fraught with political problems, especially on immigration, where many Republicans see no direct link between funding the government and a deal on DACA and illegal immigrant “Dreamers.”

“This Schumer Shutdown is absolutely ridiculous,” said Sen. David Perdue (R-GA). “It is totally irresponsible for the Democrats to use government funding as a bargaining chip.”

At the White House, there was no sign that the President was going to cave on Democratic demands on immigration, as officials accused Democrats of doing all they could to slow political momentum from a big GOP tax cut plan that was signed into law in December.

Democrats said they thought they were close to a deal with the President on Friday over DACA and other immigration issues, but that Mr. Trump backed off, again emphasizing the uncertainty that surrounds talks with the White House on major legislative issues.

Even if the Senate were to approve a bill which combined provisions on DACA and the Dreamers, along with other items on border security, most Republicans say that would have little chance in the House, where GOP lawmakers favor a much tougher approach.

One obvious difference between this shutdown and the one in 2013, is seen right here in Washington, D.C., where outdoor memorials and the Smithsonian museums were still open. Those were shut down by the Obama Administration last time, in what Republicans said was an effort to punish the GOP for a shutdown battle.

Government shutdown: What will close; will you get your Social Security check; what will happen to SNAP, WIC

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 12:35 PM

What You Need to Know: Government Shutdown

Update: While the House passed legislation on Thursday to fund government  services, the Senate on Friday failed to vote on a continuing resolution that would keep the government up and running. With no bill to fund the government, non-essential services have been shutdown. 

Below is the original story that explains what will happen now that the government has been shut down.

The fight over a border wall, the fate of nearly 800,000 DACA recipients, and the wrangling over the funding of an insurance program for children could force a U.S. government shutdown after midnight on Friday if Congress does not pass legislation that would keep the government running.

While negotiations on a temporary spending bill, called a continuing resolution, are ongoing, House Republican leaders said late Wednesday that  they lacked the votes to prevent a shutdown, but that they are pressing members to back Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, (R-Wisconsin), on the  temporary spending bill.

“I think it passes,” Republican Study Committee Chairman Mark Walker, (R-North Carolina), told reporters on Wednesday. “I don’t think it’s overwhelming, but I think it passes.”

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What would happen if no bill is passed and the government “shuts down?” Here’s what to expect:

First, a government shutdown doesn’t mean the government completely shuts down. Employees and services deemed “essential” would remain in place. About half of the federal employee workforce, however, could be furloughed – sent home without pay.

Government agencies would shut down because of the lack of a bill that funds services those agencies provide. What Congress will be considering Thursday night and Friday is a continuing resolution, a way to temporarily fund the government.

What is a continuing resolution?
A continuing resolution, or “CR,” is legislation that funds government operations at the current spending level. In normal years, a bill that funds government operations is signed by Oct. 1, which is the end of the fiscal year. That didn’t happen this year.

CRs can fund the government for days, weeks or months. The CR that could be considered Thursday would fund the government through Feb. 16.

Here is a list of services and how they would be affected if a CR is not passed by Friday night:
Air travel
Air travel would not be affected as federal air traffic controllers would remain on the job and Transportation Security Administration screeners would remain in place.
Federal court
For about two weeks, federal courts would continue operating normally. After that time, the judiciary would have to furlough employees not considered essential.
Food safety
The Food and Drug Administration would handle high-risk recalls. Most routine safety inspections would be halted.
Health
Patients in the National Institutes of Health would continue to be treated. New patients would not be accepted until a funding bill is in place.
International travel 
You could still get a passport and visa applications would still be processed by the State Department. Fees collected when someone applies for a visa or a passport fund those services.
Loans 
The Federal Housing Administration, the agency that guarantees about 30 percent of all American home mortgages, wouldn't be able to underwrite or approve any new loans during a shutdown, causing a delay for those using one of those loans to purchase a home. 
The mail
You would still get mail, as the U.S. Postal Service is not funded by taxpayer dollars for everyday operations.
Military
Active-duty military personnel would stay on duty, but their paychecks would be delayed.
National parks
All national parks would be closed, as would the Smithsonian museums. Visitors in overnight campgrounds in national parks would be given 48 hours to make alternate arrangements and leave the park.
School lunches, SNAP and WIC
School breakfasts and lunches funded by the federal government would not be affected. The Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, or WIC, could be affected. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, which used to be called the Food Stamp Program, would continue to be funded and SNAP benefits would continue to be distributed. But several smaller feeding programs would not have the money to operate.
Science
The National Weather Service would keep forecasting weather.
Social Security
Social Security, Medicare and unemployment benefits would be paid, but new applications for those payments could be delayed. 
Veterans services
Most services offered through the Department of Veterans Affairs would continue.

Sources: The Associated Press; Politicothe Congressional Research Service