Deadly king cobra captured after massive 5-week search in Florida

Published: Thursday, October 08, 2015 @ 6:41 AM
Updated: Thursday, October 08, 2015 @ 6:41 AM

Trending on Facebook

More popular and trending stories

A king cobra that escaped from an Orlando, Florida, home in early September and was the subject of a massive search effort has been found.

The snake, which escaped its cage at a home on North Apopka Vineland Road, was discovered at a nearby home late Wednesday night.

A woman called Orange County Animal Control after she said she was in her garage putting items in her clothes dryer when she heard a hissing sound.

>> PHOTOS: Missing king cobra captured in Florida

Animal control officers and police responded and found the snake under the dryer.

The snake was captured and returned to owner Mike Kennedy. Kennedy's wife confirmed that it was their king cobra.

>> PREVIOUS STORY: FWC: King cobra sighting false alarm

>> PREVIOUS STORY: Traps set with dead snakes in search for escaped king cobra in Orlando

>> PREVIOUS STORY: Still no sign of king cobra that escaped from Orlando man's home

The non-native, venomous snake escaped from Kennedy's home, which is used as a rescue facility for exotic animals.

Kennedy was fined $366 after authorities said he admitted to waiting 24 hours to report the escape.

>> Read more trending stories

>> Read more Floridoh! stories

The snake's escape led to a massive search effort, which included setting traps to capture the animal.

Senate reaches deal to end shutdown; Trump to speak soon

Published: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 12:16 PM
Updated: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 1:19 PM

What You Need to Know: Government Shutdown

Senate Democrats agreed to support a bill today to re-open the federal government until early next month in return for Republican promises to permit a floor debate on a bill to provide protection for the children of undocumented immigrants, a program known as the Deferred Action for Child Arrivals, or DACA.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., announced the breakthrough on the Senate floor shortly before a scheduled vote today on a bill to keep the government open until Feb. 8 and extend for six years a popular program that provides billions of federal dollars to the states to pay for the health care costs of low-income children.

"We expect that a bipartisan bill on DACA will receive fair consideration and an up-or-down vote on the floor," Schumer said.

WATCH LIVE: Senate votes on shutdown

If the Senate agrees, the government will re-open this afternoon.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., earlier today pledged to have the Senate will take up immigration after the government re-opens. In a floor speech this morning, McConnell promised “an amendment process that is fair to all sides.”

“This immigration debate will have a level playing field at the outset,” McConnell said.

Senate Democrats had discovered what congressional Republicans learned in 1995 and 2013 – that it is difficult to prevail in a partial shutdown against a White House which will not budge.

In 2013, Republican Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, demanded that the price for keeping the federal government open was for President Barack Obama to scrap his signature 2010 health law known as Obamacare. Obama held firm and the congressional Republicans collapsed in acrimony.

This time, Senate Democrats are insisting that any move to open the government protections for the children of undocumented immigrants, a program known as the Deferred Action for Child Arrivals, or DACA.

In an appearance Sunday on CBS’s “Face The Nation,” House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., said “as Republicans, we have some experience with futile gestures like government shutdown.”

LATEST: Dems align on plan to fund government, end shutdown

Although most analysts do not believe a brief shutdown will have any meaningful impact on the November elections, Senate Democrats such as Sherrod Brown of Ohio and Bob Casey in Pennsylvania are under intense pressure to keep the government open.

But like the tea party conservatives who backed Cruz in 2013, progressive Democrats are demanding that Senate Democrats hold firm and not yield to President Donald Trump.

“If you are a Democrat and you want to run for president you have to prove you hate Trump more than anyone else and this is part of the deal,” said Corry Bliss, who directs an independent organization support House Republicans.

Filing taxes? Here’s how a government shutdown impacts the process

 

Father, daughter found dead in frigid house sought help for furnace repair, police say

Published: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 1:09 PM

File photo. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
Scott Eisen/Getty Images
File photo. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)(Scott Eisen/Getty Images)

A father and daughter had asked for help to fix their furnace days before their frozen bodies were discovered in their frigid house, according to police.

>> Read more trending news

The bodies of Albert Bivins, 81, and Patricia Bivins, 55, were discovered by police after a neighbor called and said he had not seen them, according to the South Bend Tribune.

The Bivins had gone to the Ferry Street Resource Center, to ask for help to get their furnace fixed. The agency, which offers job placement and housing assistance, does not give money for furnace repair, but referred them to a group that does. It is unclear if they sought help, which can take time to get approval.

“They did not come back in here with any paperwork or any bids,” Greg Nasstrom, director of the Resource Center, told the South Bend Tribune.

Gas and electricity were working in the house, which was about 32 degrees when police arrived, according to the South Bend Tribune.

Police are still investigating the cause of death but believe it to be accidental.

Who was Sergei Eisenstein? Google honors Soviet film pioneer, 'father of montage'

Published: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 12:47 PM

Filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein poses for a photo in 1935.
Public domain
Filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein poses for a photo in 1935.(Public domain)

In honor of what would have been Soviet film director Sergei Eisenstein’s 120th birthday, search engine giant Google created a special doodle tribute for its homepage.

>> Read more trending news

Here are five things to know about the Soviet legend:

He’s known as the “father of montage.

Eisenstein, who was born in Russia in 1898, was the mastermind behind montage, “a film technique of editing a fast-paced sequence of short shots to transcend time or suggest thematic juxtapositions,” Google wrote.

Essentially, a montage compresses time and gives the audience a lot of information in a short period of time. This type of technique often invokes emotion. In fact, according to CNET, Eisenstein believed the montage was “the nerve of the cinema,” and could be used to manipulate the audience’s emotions.

>> Related: Who was Selena Quintanilla? Google honors famed singer, 'Queen of Tejano'

Learn more about Eisenstein’s technique by watching the video below:

He’s best known for directing some groundbreaking films.

The Soviet artist and director is best known for his silent montage films, including “Strike” (1925), Battleship Potemkin (1925) and “October” (1928).

But some of Eisenstein’s historical epics, “Alexander Nevsky” (1938) and the two-part “Ivan the Terrible” (1944, 1958) left a lasting impression on modern filmmaking.

According to CNET, his work influenced the work of many notable filmmakers, including Alfred Hitchcock and Brian De Palma.

>> Related: Google honors actress Marlene Dietrich with doodle

He received the Order of Lenin and Stalin Prize.

Eisenstein received the awards for his film “Alexander Nevsky” (1938), a movie with anti-Nazi Germany themes.

But when dictator Joseph Stalin entered into a pact with Adolf Hitler of Germany in 1939, Eisenstein’s “Nevsky” was quickly pulled. It wasn’t until 1941, after war broke out with Germany, that the film was re-released to international acclaim.

>> Related: Google marks anniversary of hip-hop with new interactive doodle

He was good friends with American actor Charlie Chaplin.

The two spent a lot of time together in the 1930s.

In Chaplin’s memoirs, he wrote about playing tennis with Eisenstein, going on boat rides and even described Eisenstein’s film “Battleship Potemkin” as “the best film in the world,” according to his memoir.

According to Ronald Bergan’s book, “Sergei Eisenstein: A Life in Conflict,” Eisenstein wrote, “Reality is like the serious white clown. It seems earnest and logical. Circumspect and prudent. But in the final analysis it is reality that looks the fool, the object of derision. Its partner, Chaplin, guileless and childlike, comes out on top. He laughs carelessly without even noticing that his laugh slays reality.”

>> Related: Who was Delores del Rio? Google honors Mexican actress with doodle

He died when he was 50 years old.

Eisenstein died of a second heart attack on Feb. 11, 1948, in his Moscow apartment.

Senate moves to end shutdown as Democrats accept DACA debate offer

Published: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 7:34 AM

In the third day of a government shutdown, the Senate moved Monday afternoon to approve a bill to fund the operations of the federal government, as Democrats dropped their opposition to a three week funding plan, accepting an assurance from Senate Republicans that there would be an upcoming debate on immigration issues involving illegal immigrants who were brought to this country at a young age by their parents.

“The Trump shutdown will soon end,” said Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer.

The deal hinged on the pledge of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to bring a bill to the floor of the Senate dealing with DACA, illegal immigrant “Dreamers” and general immigration enforcement matters, if no deal is reached in negotiations by February 8.

“I’m encouraged by the commitments that Leader McConnell has made,” said Sen. Chris Coons (D-DE), who joined other Democrats in supporting a move to re-open the federal government.

“I’m confident that we can get the 60 votes needed in the Senate for a DACA bill,” said Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer, who said the process will be “neutral and fair to all sides.”

“We have a way to address the fate of the Dreamers, instead of waiting until March,” Schumer added, referencing the March 5 deadline set by President Donald Trump for action in Congress on that subject.

But even with this agreement, there is certainly no guarantee that Democrats will get a bill that they like on immigration – and no assurance that whatever gets approved by Senators will be voted on in the House.

And there were quickly signs that Republicans would not cave to Democrats on the issue.

“We’re not going to go through this charade again where Democrats shut down the government because they’re putting the interests of illegal immigrants and foreigners over American citizens,” said Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR).