Arrested teen helps save police officer

Published: Tuesday, January 13, 2015 @ 12:14 PM
Updated: Tuesday, January 13, 2015 @ 12:14 PM

Trending on Facebook

More popular and trending stories

Teenager Jamal Rutledge was being booked after his arrest when the officer processing him collapsed and clenched his chest in pain. Apparently, there were no hard feelings on Rutledge's part, because he immediately did all he could to alert officers nearby.

He kicked the facility's security fence to make noise and yelled out for help. Officers quickly responded by cutting off  officer Franklin Foulks' vest, performing CPR and using a defibrilator to stimulate Foulks' heart.

Rutldege's actions, back in September, helped save Foulks' life. Now the Fort Lauderdale Police Department is honoring him and the other officers for their actions.

You can watch the entire incident below (scroll to 37:55).

Woman who killed two children in murder-suicide had no history of ‘mental problems’

Published: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 9:56 PM

Al and Patricia Treadway talk with a North Carolina reporter about the murder-suicide of their daughter and two grandchildren earlier this month. Police say Christina Treadway killed the children before jumping off a bridge to her death.
WSOC TV
Al and Patricia Treadway talk with a North Carolina reporter about the murder-suicide of their daughter and two grandchildren earlier this month. Police say Christina Treadway killed the children before jumping off a bridge to her death.(WSOC TV)

Dozens of people gathered Sunday night in northwest Charlotte to remember three lives lost.

Mourners lit candles and prayed for Isaiah and Iliyah Miller, as well as their mother, Christina Treadway, near their home on Sebastiani Drive.

Police said Treadway killed her two children before killing herself along Interstate 485 earlier this month.

>> Read more trending news 

In a new and emotional interview with Treadway's parents, Al and Patricia Treadway said were still in disbelief over their daughter and two grandchildren’s deaths.

Christina Treadway, 34, killed her two children before jumping off a bridge on Interstate 485, police said.

Christina Treadway with her two children, 7-year-old Isaiah, left, and 3-year-old Iliyah.(Instagram)

“She was just a lovely person. She was loved by so many people,” Patricia Treadway said. “She’s never had a mental problem. We never had a problem with Christina in any shape or form with mental or depression or anything to do with depression at all."

The Treadways told Eyewitness News that their daughter left the family a suicide note on Facebook with instructions to delete the note after reading what she had to say.

“She said she was sorry and to pretend to just forgive her and pretend she was 3,000 miles away happy," Al Treadway said. "Part of the message that she left for us said she couldn't leave her children without a mother and no one else would ever raise her kids. No one.”

Investigators are trying to figure out what led to the deaths of Treadway and her two children, 7-year-old Isaiah and 3-year-old Iliyah.

“Iliyah had a lot of what Tina had. She was a primper. She wanted to wear makeup. She’d say, 'Mommy do my makeup' so Christina would do her makeup for her and then they'd snap pictures and things. Isaiah, he was all boy. He was a prankster,” Patricia Treadway said.

>> Related: Charlotte neighborhood left shaken by deaths of 7- and 3-year-old kids

The Treadways said that their daughter was a singer and aspiring entrepreneur who wanted to start her own business to teach women about makeup and beauty and to encourage them to look and feel confident for job interviews.

Their daughter also had a YouTube channel where she displayed her talents and often featured her children singing.

"When she walked into a room, she lit it up just like her children," her mother said. “Their whole life was so much ahead of them, much like Christina.”

"We are devastated. My whole family is devastated and the question right now in everybody's mind is, ‘Why?" her father said.

The family said days before the death of their daughter and grandchildren, Christina made plans with her parents to move back to California.

“The plans were already made. We didn’t buy the tickets because we hadn’t heard from her,” her mother said. “If she was hurting that bad, I wish she would have called me that day to let me know.”

As investigators work to find out key details leading up to their daughter’s death, the Treadways are willing to wait as long as it takes to get those answers.

“I would rather them investigate, and investigate, and investigate and find out exactly what happened, no matter what the result. Rather than just say, ‘Oh, she just snapped and jumped off a bridge.'"

Neighbors have set up a small memorial in front of Christina Treadway’s home. The family is planning a service for Treadway and her children in California in the coming weeks.

Here’s what the children in the California torture house did to cope with the abuse

Published: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 9:16 PM

David and Louise Turpin in a court appearance in Riverside County, Calif. The Turpins are facing life behind bars for a series of charges, including torture.
Associated Press
David and Louise Turpin in a court appearance in Riverside County, Calif. The Turpins are facing life behind bars for a series of charges, including torture.(Associated Press)

Authorities are releasing more information about the California “torture house” where over a dozen children were kept in subhuman conditions by their parents, including that the victims kept journals.

>> Read more trending news 

Though the children in the home, ages 2 to 29, were only allowed to bathe twice a year and eat once a day, they were allowed to write all the time. Riverside County District Attorney Mike Hestrin said at a press conference on the case that the children kept hundreds of journals and that he believes they will be “very significant” in the upcoming court case, the Desert Sun reported. Hestrin added that he thinks the journals will provide “strong evidence of what occurred in that home.”

>> Related: Couple behind California torture house just appeared in court — here’s what they had to say

Researchers are also interested in the journals as they detail the first-hand accounts of horrific abuse. One academic told the Desert Sun “There is a good chance that being able to write may have kept them sane. In an interesting way, this may have helped them come to terms with the bizarre world they lived in.” He even compared them to the journals kept by Anne Frank.

The journals could prove valuable for prosecutors as they might provide damning evidence that could be used to cross-examine the parents, David and Louise Turpin. The Turpins are facing life behind bars for a series of charges, including torture.

The journals have not been made public, and law enforcement officials are currently in the process of reviewing them.

>> Related: Giant burning spider spreads flames in apartment, after torched by tenants

The conditions in the home were unimaginable. The children were reportedly beaten and chained to furniture. Neighbors recalled seeing them marching during the night, and they were almost never allowed outside. They were finally liberated when one girl escaped and managed to find a police officer. She was 17 years old, but her growth was so stunted that police allegedly estimated her to be closer to 10 years old when they first saw her.

President Trump signs bill ending government shutdown

Published: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 12:16 PM
Updated: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 9:02 PM

What You Need to Know: Government Shutdown

A Senate standoff that partially shuttered the federal government for nearly three days ended Monday when Senate Democrats agreed to support a bill to re-open the federal government through Feb. 8.

Sen. Sherrod Brown joined 31 Democrats and independent Angus King of Maine in backing the spending bill, which they did under the condition that the GOP permit debate on a bill to provide protection for the children of undocumented immigrants, a program known as the Deferred Action for Child Arrivals, or DACA.

The final vote to move forward was 81-18. Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, also backed the measure. The House passed the bill later Monday on a 266-150 vote.

President Donald Trump signed the bill just before 9 p.m. Monday.

WATCH LIVE: Senate votes on shutdown

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D–N.Y., announced the breakthrough on the Senate floor shortly before a scheduled vote on a bill to keep the government open 17 days. The bill would also extend for six years a popular program that provides billions of federal dollars to the states to pay for the health care costs of low-income children.

"We expect that a bipartisan bill on DACA will receive fair consideration and an up–or–down vote on the floor," Schumer said.

Earlier Monday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R–Ky., pledged to have the Senate will take up immigration after the government re-opens. In a floor speech Monday morning, McConnell promised “an amendment process that is fair to all sides.”

“This immigration debate will have a level playing field at the outset,” McConnell said.

Said President Trump in a statement: "I am pleased that Democrats in Congress have come to their senses and are now willing to fund our great military, border patrol, first responders, and insurance for vulnerable children."

In a separate e-mail to supporters, he exulted: "Democrats CAVED — because of you ... We can’t let them get away with it. We will never forget the names of EVERY single liberal obstructionist responsible for this disgusting shut down, and we will work to FIRE them come November."

However, even if the Senate does ultimately vote on a bill on DACA, it's unclear whether the House will follow suit.

Not a big impact in D.C.

Still, the spending agreement cut off what had been an inconvenient but not overly disruptive morning on Capitol Hill — the first regular work day since the government closed at midnight Friday. While some Capitol staff had been furloughed because of the partial shutdown, Brown and Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, kept their staffs at full capacity.

Some of the Capitol’s restaurants and entrances were closed. A popular coffee place in a Senate office building couldn’t serve sandwiches after 1:30; it had run out of bread because of the flood of customers. Some federal workers who had driven into D.C. Monday morning to get furlough notices returned home only to find that the government was to reopen. In all, it was anticlimactic.

LATEST: Dems align on plan to fund government, end shutdown

But Republicans and Democrats seemed to disagree on the takeaway. Brown and others said they were hopeful that the agreement would be the beginning of a new era of bipartisan compromise. Republicans, meanwhile, argued that Democrats learned the hard way what congressional Republicans learned in 1995 and 2013: that it is difficult to prevail in a partial shutdown against a White House that will not budge. 

In 2013, Republican Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, demanded that the price for keeping the federal government open was for President Barack Obama to scrap his signature 2010 health-care law known as Obamacare. Obama held firm and the congressional Republicans collapsed in acrimony. Republicans including House Speaker Paul Ryan later acknowledged that the plan had not worked.

“I think if we’ve learned anything during this process it’s that a strategy to shut down the government over the issue of illegal immigration is something that the American people didn’t understand and wouldn’t have understood in the future,” McConnell said.

Portman echoed those comments. “It was wrong of Democrats to vote against continuing the operations of the government for something unrelated,” he said.

But Democrats including Brown seemed heartened that the agreement would mean not only fewer short-term spending bills, but possible compromises on pensions and other issues.

Their optimism appeared to carry to the Senate floor, where Republicans and Democrats chatted amiably with one another before the vote.

An unusual scenario

 Sen. Dick Durbin, D–Ill., said the dialogue over the weekend was something he’d not seen in years: “constructive bipartisan conversation and dialogue on the floor.”

Brown, meanwhile, said senators had “better conversations than we’ve seen in a long time, more substantive and more sort of directed.”

He said he had voted against the spending bill that failed, shutting down the government, largely because of his frustration with the temporary, month-to-month spending measures.

“You can’t run a government like that,” he said, saying the agreement reached Monday “fundamentally changes it.” If Republicans keep their part of the agreement and allow a debate on DACA, he said, it will be the first time they have allowed a Democratic amendment on the Senate floor since Trump has been president.

Although most analysts do not believe a brief shutdown will have any meaningful impact on the November elections, Senate Democrats such as Brown and Bob Casey in Pennsylvania were among those under intense pressure to keep the government open, with the National Republican Senatorial Committee airing ads online against they and other Democrats in states that Trump won in 2016.

Privately, Republicans in a closed door meeting after the vote wondered if they would need to end a rule that requires 60 votes to pass a spending bill in order to prevent further shutdowns.

If there was any agreement, it was this: Republicans and Democrats would have to rely on one another in order to forge compromise; they’d have to leave Trump out of it.

Filing taxes? Here’s how a government shutdown impacts the process

 

Georgia State soccer player suspended over racial slur used on social media

Published: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 2:35 PM

Georgia State Soccer Player Uses Racial Slur On Social Media, Suspended From Team

Georgia State University soccer player was suspended from the team after she used a racial epithet on social media, school officials said.

>> Read more trending news

Freshman defender Natalia Martinez’s name was stripped from the team’s online roster after the epithet appeared on her Finsta page, a secret version of Instagram that is growing in popularity among teens.

“We do not tolerate the language the student used in her post,” the university said in a statement.

Associate athletic director Mike Holmes told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution that officials were made aware of Martinez’s post Friday morning. 

“We are handling the matter internally at the present time,” he said.

According to an online bio, Martinez is from Weston, Florida. Some Georgia State students are petitioning for her expulsion.

“As a progressive, diverse university, we ... feel like this sort of behavior should not be tolerated,” said India Bridgeforth, who created the petition, which already has more than 500 signatures.