Apple Pay Cash now allows U.S. users to send money via iMessages 

Published: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 @ 11:43 AM

Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the new iPhone X at the Steve Jobs Theater on the new Apple campus, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, in Cupertino, Calif.AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez
Marcio Jose Sanchez / ASSOCIATED PRESS
Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the new iPhone X at the Steve Jobs Theater on the new Apple campus, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, in Cupertino, Calif.AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez(Marcio Jose Sanchez / ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Apple Pay Cash is now live for U.S. users, allowing iPhone, Apple Watch, and iPad owners to transfer money to virtual Pay Cash cards.

The app requires iOS 11.2, and works with iPhone 6 or later, iPhone SE, the 5th generation of iPads, iPad pro, iPad Air 2, iPad mini 3 or later and the Apple Watch.

Apple Pay Cash allows users to send and receive money through iMessage conversations using the Messages app. Cash is sent from a linked debit or credit card, according to Apple. If you are receiving cash, it is stored in an Apple Pay Cash card in the Wallet app. That cash can be used for purchases or it can be transferred to a bank account. 
According to Apple, you will have to have two-factor authentication turned on to use the app.

The app is being rolled out to the latest iOS beta first, so it may not be available immediately to some.

There are limits on the amount of money that you can send and received per day and per transaction. If you are adding cash, there is a minimum of $10 per transaction. You cannot add more than $3,000 per day. You cannot add more than $10,000 over a 7-day period. 

If you are sending or receiving cash, there is a $1 minimum and a $3,000 maximum. You can send or receive up to $10,000 over a 7-day period. 

According to Apple, here’s what you need to use Apple Pay Cash:

Here’s how to set up Apple Pay Cash:

  • Open the Wallet app.
  • Tap on the Apple Pay Cash card that appears there.
  • Apple will walk you through the setup process, and ask if you want to enable Apple Pay.
  • You'll be directed to the Settings app to confirm your information. From there, Apple Pay Cash will take a few seconds to activate.
  • Once activated, an Apple Pay Cash card will appear in Wallet and you'll be able to access Apple Pay Cash in the Wallet app.
  • Alternatively, you can also use the Settings app to enable Apple Pay Cash. Go to Settings > Wallet > Apple Pay > Apple Pay Cash and tap the button to toggle it on. Sometimes this option won't show up until it's been activated through the Wallet app, though. 

14-year-old accidentally shot, killed by older sister

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 2:53 PM



Pixabay
(Pixabay)

A 14-year-old Indiana boy was accidentally shot and killed by his older sister Sunday as they and their father prepared to go target shooting.

Rex William Pruett was shot at his father’s home in Campbellsburg, a small Indiana town located about 50 miles northwest of Louisville, Kentucky. Rex, a seventh-grader at Orleans Junior-Senior High School, died a short time after his father rushed him to a hospital. 

“The father received a phone call and, while he was on the phone, the daughter, in what appeared to be unintentional, shot her brother with a .22-caliber revolver,” Indiana State Police spokesman Chad Dick told The Times-Mail in Bedford.

Officials at the boy’s school, where his sister is a ninth-grader, said that extra counselors were brought in Monday to help students cope with the tragedy. Police investigators waited to release the boy’s name until those measures were in place. 

“The first-period teachers had a written statement to read about the incident and then, for any students that need additional help, we have counselors standing by,” Orleans Community Schools Superintendent Gary McClintic told the newspaper.  

Chris Stevens, principal of the siblings’ school, showed a news crew from WAVE 3 News in Louisville Rex’s locker, which was adorned Monday with photos and letters from his classmates. 

“This does remind you quite a bit of Rex,” Stevens told the station. “There were a lot of tears and a lot of smiles today.”

Stevens said that faculty members and administrators have made it clear to students that the shooting was accidental. When Rex’s sister returns to class, they will offer her their support, he said. 

Family and friends also offered the girl their support on Facebook, where she described her younger brother as “such a sweet little boy.”

“Much love, Rexy, much love. We will all keep you in our hearts,” the girl wrote. 

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Stevens described the rural community as one in which guns are part of everyday life.

“In our elementary, at the sixth-grade level, we have a gun safety course that all of our students are allowed to go through,” Stevens told the news station

McClintic, who said he taught Rex’s father when he was a teacher, described the boy’s family as a good one that had been involved with Orleans’ public schools for multiple generations. 

“It’s hard on the community, just as much as it is on the school,” McClintic told The Times-Mail

Johnny Henderson, pastor of Lost River Missionary Baptist Church in Claysville, said that Rex and his family attended services there the morning of the shooting.

“He was an outstanding young man,” Henderson said.

The pastor said the Pruett family needs support, not criticism over the shooting.

“They need support and people to pray for them for peace and comfort,” Henderson said. “They still have a hard time going forward. They still have a funeral to go to.

“They are going to be living without this young man.”

How an Ohio woman lost 125 pounds

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 5:39 PM

When Christina Littleton weighed 284 pounds she decided enough was enough. A little over two years later she was lean and toned. (Photo: daytondailynews.com)
When Christina Littleton weighed 284 pounds she decided enough was enough. A little over two years later she was lean and toned. (Photo: daytondailynews.com)

New Year’s resolutions can begin in any month of the year. August 2015 is when a success story started for Springboro resident Christina Littleton.

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Although athletic and thin during her younger years, her father’s passing from pancreatic cancer in 1999 left her reeling emotionally. She gained a lot of weight, met her husband, Jason, got married, got pregnant, and gained more weight.

“The summer of 2015 I was having too much fun, and eating too much. In August I looked at myself in the mirror and thought, ‘Who is this person?’” said Littleton, who weighed 284 pounds at that point. “I was determined that I was going to do this, so I took a picture of myself.”

The wedding photographer had been going to Weight Watchers on and off before, but this time she stuck with her weekly meetings at the Covenant Presbyterian Church in Springboro. One and a half years later, she was down 115 pounds. It took her almost eight months to lose that last 10 pounds. The 5-foot-6-inch woman is now a fit and toned 159.

“Your main goal is to go in and lose weight. But there are things that you gain,” said Littleton, whose daughter, Ava, will be 11 next month. “Going through the journey I’ve learned to change my mindset. Before, I would secretly pick myself apart in the mirror. I didn’t want Ava to see that.”

She’d been very active when she was younger, with tennis, softball and running.

“So now I’m back to that side of me; being competitive. Developing more confidence in myself and taking more risks in my personal and professional life,” said Littleton, 40. “I completed a half-marathon in Nashville last year.”

She is teaching one weekly spin class, which will soon become two at the Coffman YMCA. In honor of her father, she participates in the 5K PanCan Run (fighting to end pancreatic cancer) in Kettering every year. She also runs on the treadmill.

The weight loss has an added bonus of giving her more energy to last through those long days with her camera equipment.

“I would be on my feet for hours; 12 hours from start to finish to photograph a wedding. I remember taking 800 milligrams of Motrin, and then again in the middle of the day just to get through it,” Littleton said. “And now I work out before a wedding.”

One of the reasons she has succeeded this time is her husband, who has always been supportive.

“There are so many programs out there, and just find one that works for you. Just create new habits,” Littleton said. “Instead of reaching for a bag of chips, you reach for an apple instead. You need to re-train your brain in the way you eat.”

In addition to her running and spin classes, she varies her workout sessions. She lifts weights, powers through a TRX core-based workout and does PiYo, a fast-paced yoga.

Lauren MacDonald, the instructor of the Weight Watcher’s group that Littleton has been attending, has a story of her own. She lost 110 pounds on the program, reaching her goal in 2012. She had some good words to say about her star pupil.

“She has done a amazing job. She’s stuck with it. A lot of people come and go, but she’s very motivational and inspirational to others,” said MacDonald, a Miamisburg resident who also works as a teacher.

MacDonald’s classes run twice a week at the Covenant Presbyterian Church at 415 N. Main St., Springboro. There’s an 8 a.m. meeting on Saturdays and a 6 p.m. meeting on Mondays.

PE teacher strips naked, chases students around playground

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 11:49 AM

Police - Students on Playground Run Away From Naked PE Teacher

Parents at a Los Angeles elementary school are furious amid allegations that a physical education teacher stripped naked and chased a group of students around the school playground.

CBS Los Angeles reported that a construction worker passing by Carthay Center Elementary School on Friday captured the aftermath of the incident. The video, obtained by the news station, shows the unidentified teacher standing on the playground and putting his pants back on.

Click here to see the video.

Parents who spoke to the CBS affiliate were livid.

“He was supposed to be helping them learn PE, run around and have fun,” one parent said. “But he undressed and started chasing the kids while he was naked. Then the kids ducked and dodged, ran into some of the classrooms and got safe haven that way.”

“All of the kids saw his private parts,” another parent said. “Very embarrassing, very upset.”

>> Read more trending news

Officials with the Los Angeles Unified School District notified parents of the incident with a letter and a robocall, CBS reported

“An individual began behaving in an unusual way, prompting us to contact law enforcement,” the letter stated. “As a safety precaution, our school went on a brief lockdown while officers responded and took the individual into custody.”

District officials declined to comment further, but they did confirm that the man, a contract worker, had permission to be on the school campus, the news station said. Mental health counselors were made available to the students who witnessed the incident. 

School resource officers are investigating the man’s actions, CBS said. 

Carthay, one of more than 1,100 schools in the Los Angeles USD, is a magnet school devoted to the teaching of environmental studies. The school district is the second-largest in the United States. 

Inspiration for 'Rosie the Riveter,' Naomi Parker Fraley, dies

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 1:31 PM

File - In this Oct. 31, 2007 file photo, a poster showing signatures of former Rosie the Riveter's is seen at the offices of the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historic Park in Richmond, Calif. A woman identified by a scholar as the inspiration for Rosie the Riveter, the iconic female World War II factory worker, has died in Washington state. The New York Times reports that Naomi Parker Fraley died Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018, in Longview. She was 96. Multiple women have been identified over the years as possible models for Rosie, but a Seton Hall University professor in 2016 focused on Fraley as the true inspiration. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
Eric Risberg/AP
File - In this Oct. 31, 2007 file photo, a poster showing signatures of former Rosie the Riveter's is seen at the offices of the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historic Park in Richmond, Calif. A woman identified by a scholar as the inspiration for Rosie the Riveter, the iconic female World War II factory worker, has died in Washington state. The New York Times reports that Naomi Parker Fraley died Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018, in Longview. She was 96. Multiple women have been identified over the years as possible models for Rosie, but a Seton Hall University professor in 2016 focused on Fraley as the true inspiration. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)(Eric Risberg/AP)

The woman who many believe empowered housewives to leave their kitchens and enter the workplace left empty when men went to fight in World War II has died.

Naomi Parker Fraley was discovered in 2015 to have been the inspiration for the “Rosie the Riveter” poster tha decades earlier had become the symbol in which women realized “We Can Do It.”

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Fraley was a factory worker at Alameda Naval Station when a photographer asked to take her photo. With her hair in a bandana, just like the poster, Fraley is believed to be the starting point for the artist’s representation of women taking over what had been a men’s world, CNN reported.

Fraley was only 20 years old and was working with her 18-year-old sister at the time of the war, KATU reported.

She realized it was her photo that helped started the movement during a convention of women WWII factory workers. Her photo was labeled as the poster’s inspiration. Originally the photo was identified as that of Geraldine Hoff Doyle, but years of research confirmed in 2015 it was Fraley in the photo instead, CNN reported.

The man who made the identification, Dr. James Kimble, said of Fraley, “She didn't’ think she did anything special. A lot of women did what she did. She just wanted her picture corrected,” CNN reported.

Fraley died in Longview, Washington, Saturday, the BBC reported. She was 96.