President Trump to be a grandfather again

Published: Monday, March 20, 2017 @ 1:22 PM
Updated: Monday, March 20, 2017 @ 1:22 PM

FILE - In this Aug. 18, 2016 file photo, President Donald Trump's son Eric Trump and his wife Lara Yunaska in Statesville, N.C. Eric announced on Twitter Monday, March 20, 2017, that he and his wife Lara are expecting their first child. The baby boy is due in September.
AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File

It looks like President Donald Trump is going to be a grandfather again.

Trump’s son Eric tweeted that his wife Lara and him are having a boy in September.

He will be there first child.

President Trump retweeted saying “Congratulations Eric and Lara. Very proud and happy for the two of you.

Trump has eight grandchildren. Arabella, Joseph and Theodore Kushner and Chloe, Kai, Donald III, Tristan and Spencer.

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Kasich touts book, weighs in on Trump, Nixon, faith, media

Published: Friday, May 26, 2017 @ 4:02 PM
Updated: Friday, May 26, 2017 @ 4:03 PM

Ohio Gov. John Kasich speaks at Forum Club of the Palm Beaches in West Palm Beach, Florida on Friday, May 26, 2017. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

Ohio Gov. John Kasich weighed in on his former Republican presidential nomination rival Donald Trump at a Forum Club of the Palm Beaches lunch on Friday — but he spent more time talking about a pair of encounters he had with former President Richard Nixon.

Kasich spoke to a sellout crowd of about 700 at the Kravis Center to promote his new book Two Paths: America Divided or United. He said America is divided because conservatives and liberals tend to read, watch and listen only to media sources that confirm their points of view.

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“Turn off the cable television and go back to bowling,” advised Kasich, who used to host a show on Fox News Network.

He also said people can “live life bigger than themselves” by reconnecting to their faith.

“The beautiful thing about faith (is)…in the next hour we have a chance to do better. And I think we need to come together as a nation again and love our neighbor and spend 10 minutes out of every day reading something that we don’t agree with. It begins to open our minds to other people.”

Kasich told the story, included in his book, of how his persistence as an Ohio State University freshman in 1970 led to him getting a meeting with Nixon in the Oval Office.

Promised five minutes with the president, Kasich said the meeting ended up lasting longer.

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“The good news is as an 18-year-old I spent 20 minutes in the Oval Office with the president of the United States,” Kasich said. “The bad news is I spent 18 years in Congress and if you add up all the time I spent in the Oval Office, I peaked out at 18.”

Kasich called the Nixon anecdote “a good story for young people because it means dream big. For all of us, dream big, keep asking, just keep doing what you want to do until somebody tells you it’s impossible and then don’t believe that.”

Kasich was asked about Trump during a question-and-answer session. He noted that he didn’t endorse Trump in 2016 or attend the Republican National Convention, even though it was in Kasich’s home state.

“I didn’t do that because I was mad about something,” Kasich said of his refusal to back his party’s nominee.

“It’s just that I’m not going to support people who are putting people down or being negative or not bringing us together. Now that he’s president, of course I root for him as much as I can, just like I rooted for the pilot on the airplane that brought me to Florida. I want them to be successful.”

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As the question segment was winding down, Forum Club President Michelle McGovern told Kasich, “We have at least five people who want to know about your conversation with Nixon.”

So Kasich told the audience about a second conversation he had with Nixon in 1987. Kasich was a House member then and both his parents had just been killed by a drunk driver.

When he told Nixon about losing his parents, Kasich said, “His reaction was amazing. It was like he had been shot. It hit him like a ton of bricks.

“I said, ‘My sister is really struggling. Could you send her a note?’ And he wrote her a handwritten two-page letter that will be put in the Nixon Library at some point. It was just so amazing. And that’s a side of him that we don’t hear about.”

Kasich wasn’t asked about whether he’ll run for president again in 2020 — a possibility he hasn’t definitively ruled out. He said he’s relieved sometimes that he didn’t win in 2016.

“I’m a happy guy,” Kasich said. “I wake up in the mornings sometimes and say ‘Lord, thank you for never letting me have that job.’”

Senate Republicans head home still searching for health care deal

Published: Friday, May 26, 2017 @ 12:29 AM
Updated: Friday, May 26, 2017 @ 12:30 AM

As lawmakers trooped out of the U.S. Capitol on Thursday and headed home until early June, Senate Republicans told reporters they were making progress, but were still nowhere near finalizing a deal on a major overhaul of the Obama health law.

“Doing nothing is not an option,” said Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX), as top Republicans tried to project a feeling that the GOP is making some headway in making changes to a bill approved in the House earlier this month.

“I believe Senators across the ideological spectrum are proceeding in good faith,” said Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX).

“Leader McConnell is doing a great job right now, focusing on the priorities that we’ve all agreed to, that are broken under Obamacare,” said Sen. David Perdue (R-GA), who said he thought there would be legislative language put together in the near future by GOP Senators.

But one thing no one was talking about on the GOP side, was when a health care bill might get to the Senate floor for an actual debate, and vote.

“We’re a long ways from that,” said Sen. Mike Rounds (R-ND), “but you’ve got to start with something to begin with. And that’s what this is all about.”

But the schedule is already squeezing Republicans, as there are four work weeks in June, plus three in July – then Congress is scheduled to leave for a five week summer break that lasts until Labor Day.

Not only are there few work days, but Republicans still have to get the House bill past the scrutiny of the Senate Parliamentarian, and then make sure any changes also pass muster with strict Senate rules governing budget reconciliation, which prevents a bill from being subject to a 60 vote filibuster.

One item from the House bill that could be in trouble in the Senate, is the idea of allowing states to opt out of certain requirements from the Obama health law, like the list of “Essential Health Benefits” that must be covered by insurance.

How Republicans might broker some of the differences wasn’t clear as members headed for the airport, though individual Senators are clearly looking for a breakthrough.

“Can you talk to me in two weeks? We’re working on something,” Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA) told reporters, refusing to give any hints of what he is trying to cobble together on coverage.

“No, cause I don’t know if it works. I’m running it by actuaries, I’m running it by people who really know their stuff,” Cassidy added.

And that’s where Republicans are right now – still searching for a deal, while the clock keeps ticking.

Federal appeals court keeps Trump travel and refugee order on hold

Published: Thursday, May 25, 2017 @ 2:37 PM
Updated: Thursday, May 25, 2017 @ 2:37 PM

In another legal setback for President Donald Trump, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals refused on Thursday to lift an injunction against his revised travel and refugee order, preventing the White House from suspending new visas for people from six Muslim-majority countries, as this decision took another step on the way to a likely showdown on the matter at the U.S. Supreme Court.

As in earlier rulings, the judges cited the President’s own words calling for a “Muslim ban,” ruling that the order was basically an effort to target “Muslims for exclusion from the United States.”

“These statements, taken together, provide direct specific evidence” of what spurred the executive orders, the court’s majority wrote in a 202 page decision.

“President Trump’s desire to exclude Muslims from the United States,” the opinion read.

Not only did the ruling quote Mr. Trump, but also some of his top aides and advisers, like White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer, former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani, and others.

The judges rejected an argument by the Trump Administration that the order was done in the name of national security, saying the record shows Mr. Trump belatedly consulted agencies that deal with that matter, and only after his first travel order had been derailed in the courts.

The President’s order would impact people coming into the United States from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen – Iraq had been on the original order, but was taken off when that first plan was revised.

The ruling was the first of two from federal appellate courts – the Ninth Circuit also must pass judgment on the plan.

“The Muslim ban continues to be 100% blocked from going into effect nationwide, by an overwhelming vote,” said lawyer Neal Katyal, who argued this same issue before the Ninth Circuit for the state of Hawaii.

Kasich wants ‘voice’ in 2020; tunes it up now with book, West Palm talk

Published: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 @ 2:15 PM


            Ohio Gov. John Kasich in Orlando for the Republican Party of Florida’s Sunshine Summit in November 2015. (George Bennett/The Palm Beach Post)

Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who was the last Republican standing against Donald Trump in 2016 and refused to endorse him in the general election, says in a new book that it’s time for “thinking, feeling Americans to come together in support of the Trump administration.”

But Kasich — who will appear in West Palm Beach at a Forum Club of the Palm Beaches lunch on Friday to promote the book — also writes that Trump won’t get a “free pass.”

The book is titled Two Paths: America Divided or United, and Kasich spoke to The Palm Beach Post this week about it and his upcoming speech, as well as his 2016 presidential run and 2020 plans, such as they are.

“I have no clue what I’m doing in 2020,” said Kasich, who faces term limits as Ohio governor in January 2019. “I’m wondering what I’m going to be doing in the next 20 minutes. I don’t know. I really don’t. I’d like to have a voice, whether it’s through public office or whether it’s not. I think that’s going to be left to a higher power than me.”