President Trump to be a grandfather again

Published: Monday, March 20, 2017 @ 1:22 PM
Updated: Monday, March 20, 2017 @ 1:22 PM

President Trump to be a grandfather again

It looks like President Donald Trump is going to be a grandfather again.

Trump’s son Eric tweeted that his wife Lara and him are having a boy in September.

He will be there first child.

President Trump retweeted saying “Congratulations Eric and Lara. Very proud and happy for the two of you.

Trump has eight grandchildren. Arabella, Joseph and Theodore Kushner and Chloe, Kai, Donald III, Tristan and Spencer.

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Kasich goes to Washington, calls on Congress to get along

Published: Tuesday, March 28, 2017 @ 6:00 AM


            Kasich goes to Washington, calls on Congress to get along

John Kasich’s bipartisanship tour landed in Washington, D.C., Monday, with the Ohio governor urging lawmakers to make nice with Democrats and lauding journalists — a group that President Donald Trump has referred to as “the enemy of the people” — at a D.C. dinner.

Kasich flew into Washington to meet with members of the Tuesday Group, the coalition of moderate Republicans who were prepared to vote down a GOP effort to reform health care and repeal the 2010 health care law known as Obamacare.

Moderate Republicans as well as the conservative House Freedom Caucus united against the bill, with the former arguing it was cruel to the poor and the latter arguing it didn’t undo enough of the 2010 law. The bill never came to a vote.

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While Trump has argued he’ll let the 2010 law collapse on its own, Kasich and the Tuesday Group argue the time is right to shoot for incremental changes to Obamacare. To do so, they said, they’ll have to enlist the support of Democrats.

Rep. Charlie Dent, a Pennsylvania Republican who co-chairs the Tuesday Group, said he believes Democrats will be willing to work with Republicans to help fix the individual market, which both sides have acknowledged needs attention. He said they might be able to work together on other unpopular aspects of the bill.

But in order for that to happen, Democrats will have to come to the table. Kasich urged moderate Republicans to reach out.

“My concern now is will the Democrats be emboldened enough to say ‘we’re not participating. You all are drowning and go ahead and drown?’” Kasich asked. “The problem with that is there are some provisions of the Affordable Care Act that need to be addressed.”

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He said not fixing flaws in the 2010 law could result in people losing their coverage. But Democrats will have to trust Republicans in order to keep that from happening.

“Ask Democrats for a date,” he said. “If they don’t give you one, put it on Facebook. Unfriend them.”

Later, Kasich gave the keynote address at the 2017 Toner Prize Celebration, an award ceremony honoring political reporting. The winner this year was David A. Farenthold of the Washington Post. As Kasich spoke, a source close to the Ohio governor confirmed he will be returning to New Hampshire in late April after the release of his book, “Two Paths: America Divided or United.”

Kasich told the crowd about his time in the House, where some days he would go down to the gym and play basketball with Democrats, or even go out to dinner and have drinks. Those days, he said, seem to be past — and those divisions make things dysfunctional, he maintained.

“What do we do in life where we don’t compromise?” he asked, saying many of the banner achievements in Congress over the years — civil rights, Medicare and Social Security — “happened because both parties stamped them approved.”

Of Congress, he said: “These people cling to their jobs because it becomes their identity. These jobs…sometimes you’ve got to walk.”

Still, he said, he is confident the country will bridge the divide.

“I have a sense in my soul we’re going to get through this,” he said. “But it’s going to take all of us.”

White House: Trump not giving up on overhaul of Obama health law

Published: Monday, March 27, 2017 @ 2:56 PM
Updated: Monday, March 27, 2017 @ 2:57 PM

Three days after a GOP health care bill melted down in the U.S. House before a vote, the White House said President Trump is not giving up on his desire to overhaul the Obama health law, as Republicans in the Congress also urged the President to keep pushing ahead on major health insurance changes.

“I don’t think it’s dead,” said White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said of the failed GOP health bill, which foundered even after repeated efforts by the President to twist the arms of reluctant Republican lawmakers.

“We’re at the beginning of a process. I don’t think we’ve seen the end of health care,” Spicer added, labeling the Obama health law, “an abysmal failure.”

Spicer said the White House is currently going through a post-mortem on what went right and what wrong in their effort, as he said members of both parties in Congress had already reached out to both the White House and Mr. Trump about finding some common ground on health care policy.

On Capitol Hill, both parties were still sifting through the embers of the GOP health care bill, which was yanked off the House floor on Friday afternoon before a final vote, clearly short on support, as it divided Republicans along several fault lines.

For many GOP lawmakers, the idea of giving up after just 18 days of work on health care changes, was not an option.

“We cannot walk away now, without even a vote,” said Rep. Luke Messer (R-IN), a junior member of the House GOP leadership, said on the House floor.

“I will continue to fight for a conservative bill to repeal Obamacare and rebuild a people-first health care system,” said Rep. Richard Hudson (R-NC).

But there was no immediate signal on whether the White House or GOP leaders in Congress would look to tinker with the failed health bill of last week, or maybe start to develop a new plan.

Democrats force delay in Senate committee vote on Gorsuch nomination

Published: Monday, March 27, 2017 @ 12:12 PM
Updated: Monday, March 27, 2017 @ 12:19 PM

Democrats used rules on the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday to force a one week delay in a vote on the nomination of Neil Gorsuch for the U.S. Supreme Court, as Democratic opponents sent mixed signals on whether or not they would lead an all-out filibuster against President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

The delay by Democrats – which they can do only once before the Judiciary Committee – also included two other top nominations by President Trump to the Justice Department.

All three of those nominees are expected to gain committee approval next week – from there, it is on to the Senate floor.

For now, a number of Democrats are making clear that they will try to block the Gorsuch nomination, once it reaches the U.S. Senate floor – but it’s not clear if all Democrats will join that move.

“As of now I do not believe I can support Judge Gorsuch,” said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), a former chairman of the Senate Judiciary panel.

But Leahy left himself some wiggle room on a filibuster.

Democrats are still angry about Republicans blocking action last year on President Barack Obama’s nomination of Merrick Garland for the U.S. Supreme Court.

If they stick together, they could deny the GOP 60 votes on the floor of the Senate, and bottle up the Gorsuch nomination.

Some in the GOP have threatened to “go nuclear” and change the Senate rules to get rid of the 60 vote threshold for Supreme Court nominees, as has been done for all other Presidential nominees.

Democrats for delay in Senate committee vote on Gorsuch nomination

Published: Monday, March 27, 2017 @ 12:12 PM
Updated: Monday, March 27, 2017 @ 12:13 PM

Democrats used rules on the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday to force a one week delay in a vote on the nomination of Neil Gorsuch for the U.S. Supreme Court, as Democratic opponents sent mixed signals on whether or not they would lead an all-out filibuster against President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

The delay by Democrats – which they can do only once before the Judiciary Committee – also included two other top nominations by President Trump to the Justice Department.

All three of those nominees are expected to gain committee approval next week.