Does Trump's 'locker room banter' describe sexual assault?

Published: Monday, October 10, 2016 @ 12:57 PM
Updated: Monday, October 10, 2016 @ 12:57 PM

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump denied on Sunday that lewd comments he made on a soap opera set in 2005 described sexual assault as fallout over the recording continues to rock the GOP.

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Supporters have echoed Trump's assertion that the conversation between him and "Access Hollywood" host Billy Bush amounted to little more than "locker room banter." Critics, however, say what Trump described is sexual assault.

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"You described kissing women without consent, grabbing their genitals. That is sexual assault," moderator Anderson Cooper said Sunday at the second presidential debate. "You bragged that you have sexually assaulted women. Do you understand that?"

"No, I didn't say that at all," Trump said. "I don't think you understood what was — this was locker room talk."

Audio of the conversation was obtained by The Washington Post and published Friday. It was recorded on a microphone that neither Trump nor Bush realized was on before Trump filmed a cameo for "Days of Our Lives."

>> Related: Trump deals with fallout from vulgar recording, vows to stay in race

"I better use some Tic Tacs in case I start kissing her," Trump said in the recording after spotting one of the show's actresses. "You know, I'm automatically attracted to beautiful women – I just start kissing them, it's like a magnet. Just kiss. I don't even wait. And when you're a star, they let you do it. You can do anything … grab them by the (expletive). You can do anything."

The comments do appear to fall under the definition of sexual assault as used by the U.S. Department of Justice.

According to authorities, "Sexual assault is any type of sexual contact or behavior that occurs without the explicit consent of the recipient."

>> Related: Here are the controversial things Donald Trump has said

At Sunday's debate, Trump said that despite the controversial comments he has never kissed or touched a woman without her consent.

"I've said things that, frankly, you hear these things I said. And I was embarrassed by it," Trump said. "But I have tremendous respect for women."

Trump says new tariffs will spur jobs, won’t spark a trade war

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 9:20 AM

After months of tough talk about defending U.S. businesses against cheap imported goods, President Donald Trump on Tuesday officially signed off on new tariffs on imports of certain washing machines and solar power equipment, following through on his campaign vows to make trade work better for American companies.

“Our companies will not be taken advantage of anymore,” the President told reporters at the White House, repeating a common theme from his campaign for the White House.

In a signing ceremony in the Oval Office, the President officially accepted a recommendation from the U.S. International Trade Commission, which investigated specific trade complaints about washing machines and solar panels, and recommended higher tariffs for four years.

“There won’t be a trade war,” the President predicted, brushing off warnings about his tariff decisions possibly sparking retaliatory measures by China and South Korea.

Under the plan, there will be an immediate 30 percent tariff on most imports of solar energy components, as well as a 50 percent tariff on larger imported washing machines.

“My administration is committed to defending American companies, and they’ve been very badly hurt, from harmful import surges that threaten the livelihood of their workers,” the President said.

“We’re bringing business back to the United States for the first time in many, many years,” he added.

The President’s tariff move came as American negotiators began a new week of talks Tuesday in Montreal on changes to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), with officials from Canada and Mexico working on possible changes to that trade deal.

Mr. Trump has made clear he wants the details of NAFTA to be rewired, as he charges that U.S. businesses are being treated unfairly in some trade areas, threatening at times to tear up the deal.

The immediate reaction in Congress and the business community to the President’s tariff decision was mixed, as some lawmakers said the moves could cost jobs and hurt consumers – the exact opposite of Mr. Trump’s argument.

“Here’s something Republicans used to understand,” said Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE). “Tariffs are taxes on families.”

Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) echoed Sasse, saying the move was “nothing more than a tax on consumers.”

“This is shortsighted and will cost American jobs,” said Rep. Mark Sanford (R-SC), who said solar power industry jobs were now at stake in his home state, as that industry denounced the move.

But for others, the higher tariffs will help preserve jobs, threatened by less inexpensive imports.

“This is welcome news for the thousands of Whirlpool workers in Clyde, Ohio, whose jobs have been threatened by a surge of cheap washers,” said Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH).

“Whirlpool has had to fight a series of cases against companies who would rather cheat than compete,” said Brown’s colleague, Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH).

Going through FBI texts, Republicans discover five missing months

Published: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 11:30 PM

Already raising questions about possible investigatory bias inside the FBI, Republicans in Congress are now demanding more answers about how five months of text messages between two senior FBI employees on the Hillary Clinton email probe, Peter Strzok and Lisa Page, were not archived and properly retained by the bureau.

“The loss of records from this period is concerning because it is apparent from other records that Mr. Strzok and Ms. Page communicated frequently about the investigation,” said Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) in a letter to the FBI Director.

The FBI says the texts weren’t kept because of a misconfiguration of software upgrades on cell phones issued to employees.

That explanation fell flat on Capitol Hill.

“This is a “my dog ate my homework” level excuse,” said Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC). “Americans deserve to know if there was rampant anti-Trump bias at the FBI, and certainly if there was an effort to cover it up.”

The review of how the FBI handled the Clinton email case has gone hand in hand with assertions by Republicans that officials inside the FBI were biased in favor of Clinton, and biased against President Donald Trump, saying that may have bled into the subsequent investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election.

In a joint statement, three House GOP lawmakers said the details of newly revealed texts were “extremely troubling,” and showed bias involved in the investigation.

“The omission of text messages between December 2016 and May 2017, a critical gap encompassing the FBI’s Russia investigation, is equally concerning, ” said Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC), Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA), and Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA).

The texts between Strzok and Page, would have covered a period during the Trump transition, running up to the time that Robert Mueller’s Special Counsel investigation began.

Few specifics were released from the latest batch of FBI texts to detail what exactly the Republicans had found, as GOP lawmakers instead focused on the overall situation – for example, Rep. John Ratcliffe (R-TX) said the texts he saw “revealed manifest bias among top FBI officials.”

The discovery of the missing texts swiftly brought back memories for Republicans of how thousands of emails went missing of Lois Lerner, a top Internal Revenue Service officials involved in a controversy about bias against more conservative groups seeking non-profit status.

Strzok and Page are important figures for two reasons – they were both part of the Clinton email investigation, and then had roles in Mueller’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Two were found to be having an affair; Strzok, a senior counterintelligence official, was reassigned from the Mueller probe after the discovery of the text messages between the two.

President Trump signs bill ending government shutdown

Published: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 12:16 PM
Updated: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 9:02 PM

What You Need to Know: Government Shutdown

A Senate standoff that partially shuttered the federal government for nearly three days ended Monday when Senate Democrats agreed to support a bill to re-open the federal government through Feb. 8.

Sen. Sherrod Brown joined 31 Democrats and independent Angus King of Maine in backing the spending bill, which they did under the condition that the GOP permit debate on a bill to provide protection for the children of undocumented immigrants, a program known as the Deferred Action for Child Arrivals, or DACA.

The final vote to move forward was 81-18. Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, also backed the measure. The House passed the bill later Monday on a 266-150 vote.

President Donald Trump signed the bill just before 9 p.m. Monday.

WATCH LIVE: Senate votes on shutdown

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D–N.Y., announced the breakthrough on the Senate floor shortly before a scheduled vote on a bill to keep the government open 17 days. The bill would also extend for six years a popular program that provides billions of federal dollars to the states to pay for the health care costs of low-income children.

"We expect that a bipartisan bill on DACA will receive fair consideration and an up–or–down vote on the floor," Schumer said.

Earlier Monday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R–Ky., pledged to have the Senate will take up immigration after the government re-opens. In a floor speech Monday morning, McConnell promised “an amendment process that is fair to all sides.”

“This immigration debate will have a level playing field at the outset,” McConnell said.

Said President Trump in a statement: "I am pleased that Democrats in Congress have come to their senses and are now willing to fund our great military, border patrol, first responders, and insurance for vulnerable children."

In a separate e-mail to supporters, he exulted: "Democrats CAVED — because of you ... We can’t let them get away with it. We will never forget the names of EVERY single liberal obstructionist responsible for this disgusting shut down, and we will work to FIRE them come November."

However, even if the Senate does ultimately vote on a bill on DACA, it's unclear whether the House will follow suit.

Not a big impact in D.C.

Still, the spending agreement cut off what had been an inconvenient but not overly disruptive morning on Capitol Hill — the first regular work day since the government closed at midnight Friday. While some Capitol staff had been furloughed because of the partial shutdown, Brown and Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, kept their staffs at full capacity.

Some of the Capitol’s restaurants and entrances were closed. A popular coffee place in a Senate office building couldn’t serve sandwiches after 1:30; it had run out of bread because of the flood of customers. Some federal workers who had driven into D.C. Monday morning to get furlough notices returned home only to find that the government was to reopen. In all, it was anticlimactic.

LATEST: Dems align on plan to fund government, end shutdown

But Republicans and Democrats seemed to disagree on the takeaway. Brown and others said they were hopeful that the agreement would be the beginning of a new era of bipartisan compromise. Republicans, meanwhile, argued that Democrats learned the hard way what congressional Republicans learned in 1995 and 2013: that it is difficult to prevail in a partial shutdown against a White House that will not budge. 

In 2013, Republican Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, demanded that the price for keeping the federal government open was for President Barack Obama to scrap his signature 2010 health-care law known as Obamacare. Obama held firm and the congressional Republicans collapsed in acrimony. Republicans including House Speaker Paul Ryan later acknowledged that the plan had not worked.

“I think if we’ve learned anything during this process it’s that a strategy to shut down the government over the issue of illegal immigration is something that the American people didn’t understand and wouldn’t have understood in the future,” McConnell said.

Portman echoed those comments. “It was wrong of Democrats to vote against continuing the operations of the government for something unrelated,” he said.

But Democrats including Brown seemed heartened that the agreement would mean not only fewer short-term spending bills, but possible compromises on pensions and other issues.

Their optimism appeared to carry to the Senate floor, where Republicans and Democrats chatted amiably with one another before the vote.

An unusual scenario

 Sen. Dick Durbin, D–Ill., said the dialogue over the weekend was something he’d not seen in years: “constructive bipartisan conversation and dialogue on the floor.”

Brown, meanwhile, said senators had “better conversations than we’ve seen in a long time, more substantive and more sort of directed.”

He said he had voted against the spending bill that failed, shutting down the government, largely because of his frustration with the temporary, month-to-month spending measures.

“You can’t run a government like that,” he said, saying the agreement reached Monday “fundamentally changes it.” If Republicans keep their part of the agreement and allow a debate on DACA, he said, it will be the first time they have allowed a Democratic amendment on the Senate floor since Trump has been president.

Although most analysts do not believe a brief shutdown will have any meaningful impact on the November elections, Senate Democrats such as Brown and Bob Casey in Pennsylvania were among those under intense pressure to keep the government open, with the National Republican Senatorial Committee airing ads online against they and other Democrats in states that Trump won in 2016.

Privately, Republicans in a closed door meeting after the vote wondered if they would need to end a rule that requires 60 votes to pass a spending bill in order to prevent further shutdowns.

If there was any agreement, it was this: Republicans and Democrats would have to rely on one another in order to forge compromise; they’d have to leave Trump out of it.

Filing taxes? Here’s how a government shutdown impacts the process

 

Congress ends government shutdown, as Senate agrees to immigration debate

Published: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 1:11 PM

Ending a three day stalemate that resulted in a federal government shutdown, Democrats on Monday dropped their filibuster of a temporary spending bill in the Senate, allowing the Congress to swiftly approve a resumption of government funding, which will put hundreds of thousands of federal workers back on the job immediately.

“I am pleased that Democrats in Congress have come to their senses,” President Donald Trump said in a written statement issued by the White House, as Republicans said Democrats had folded under pressure.

The Senate voted 81-18 to re-open the government. The House followed soon after, voting 266-150 in favor of the plan.

The deal reached on Monday between the two parties not only allows government funding to resume, but will re-start negotiations on major budget issues, as well as the question of what should be done with illegal immigrant “Dreamers” in the United States.

“We will make a long-term deal on immigration if, and only if, it is good for our country,” the President said, as he met separately with Senators of each party on the matter.

When asked if they had been on the short end of the shutdown fight, Democrats emphasized the deal on immigration legislation, which will allow a Senate debate if there is no negotiated deal by February 8.

“What other choice did we have?” said Sen. Bill Nelson (R-FL) to reporters. “Otherwise, to go in gridlock and shutdown for weeks? I mean, that’s not acceptable.”

Lawmakers also approved language that will insure federal workers and members of the military will be paid, despite the funding lapse of the last three days.

While this agreement ended the shutdown, it didn’t solve the underlying problems which contributed to the high stakes political showdown.

Both parties must still work out a deal on how much to spend on the federal government operations this year – President Trump wants a big increase in military spending, while Democrats want extra money for domestic programs.

And then, there is immigration, which has bedeviled the Congress for years, and could again, as lawmakers try to work out a deal with something for both sides.

“There’s a symmetric deal to be done here on these DACA young people,” said Sen. David Perdue (R-GA), who joined a small group of other GOP Senators in meeting with the President this afternoon on immigration.

Perdue says the deal is simple – Democrats get protections for illegal immigrant “Dreamers,” while Republicans would get provisions “to provide border security, end chain migration issues, and end the diversity visa lottery.”

The White House emphasized that as well.

But to get something into law, lawmakers will need some help from the President.

“What has been difficult is dealing with the White House, and not knowing where the President is,” said Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ), as Republicans have complained publicly about conflicting signals on immigration from Mr. Trump.

“Congress should act responsibly to allow these young people to stay,” Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-MD) said of the “Dreamers.”