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AF museum discovers fuel in aircraft, plans temporary gallery shutdown

Published: Friday, December 14, 2012 @ 6:05 PM
Updated: Friday, December 14, 2012 @ 6:05 PM

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force will temporarily close some galleries Saturday due to the discovery of fuel in a vintage A-1E Skyraider, according to the museum.

Museum staff Friday discovered the fuel in the plane during an inspection.

The museum said it will close the Korean War, Southeast Asia War, Cold War and Missile and Space Galleries temporarily while the airplane is defueled. Inspectors did not find any indication of fuel leakage.

“Safety is our primary concern,” museum director Jack Hudson said in a statement. “We know this is a great inconvenience for our visitors and we plan to re-open the galleries as soon as it is safe to do so.”

The museum’s Early War and World War II galleries and the presidential aircraft and research development hangar will remain open, the museum said.

75 percent of workplace harassment victims who complain face retaliation, study finds

Published: Monday, October 16, 2017 @ 6:05 PM



altrendo images/Getty Images/Altrendo
(altrendo images/Getty Images/Altrendo)

comprehensive study conducted in 2016  by the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission uncovered some troubling truths about harassment in the workplace.

» RELATED: Sexual harassment in the workplace: What is it, how to report it and more you should know

In a preface to the report, EEOC co-chairs wrote the number of harassment complaints the team receives every year is still striking 30 years after the U.S. Supreme Court recognized sexual harassment as a form of discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

>> Read more trending news

“We present this report with a firm, and confirmed, belief that too many people in too many workplaces find themselves in unacceptably harassing situations when they are simply trying to do their jobs,” the co-chairs wrote.

» RELATED: #MeToo: Women share harrowing accounts of sexual assault, harassment

The EEOC selected a 16-member team from a variety of disciplines and regions to be part of the Select Task Force on the Study of Harassment in the Workplace, to conduct an 18-month study in which they heard from more than 30 witnesses and received numerous public comments.

Here are some of the report’s key findings about workplace harassment: 

It’s still a problem.

Nearly one-third of the 90,000 charges EEOC received in 2015 included an allegation of workplace harassment, according to the report.

» RELATED: After defending Harvey Weinstein, director Oliver Stone accused of sexual assault by Playboy model

It too often goes unreported.

Roughly three out of four victims of harassment spoke to a supervisor or representative about the harassment.

It’s also common, the report found, for those who experience harassment to either ignore and avoid the harasser, downplay the situation, try to forget the harassment or endure it.

“Employees who experience harassment fail to report the harassing behavior or to file a complaint because they fear disbelief of their claim, inaction on their claim, blame, or social or professional retaliation,” report authors wrote.

» RELATED: Jane Fonda on Harvey Weinstein: ‘I’m ashamed I didn’t say anything’

Anywhere between 25-85 percent of women reported sex-based harassment.

Using testimonies and academic articles, analysts dug deeper into the widely divergent numbers.

They found that when asked if they experienced “sexual harassment” without defining the term, 25 percent of women reported they had.

The rate grew to 40 percent when employees were asked about specific unwanted sex-based behaviors.

And when respondents were asked similar questions in surveys using convenience samples, or people who are easy to reach, such as student volunteers, the incidence rate rose to 75 percent, researchers found.

» RELATED: Harvey Weinstein booted from film academy

“Based on this consistent result, researchers have concluded that many individuals do not label certain forms of unwelcome sexually based behaviors – even if they view them as problematic or offensive – as ‘sexual harassment,’” authors wrote.

More men are reporting workplace sexual assault.

According to the EEOC, reports of men experiencing workplace sexual assault have nearly doubled between 1990 and 2009 and now account for 8 to 16 percent of all claims.

» RELATED: Sexual harassment in the workplace: What is it, how to report it and more you should know

Seventy-five percent of harassment victims faced retaliation when they came forward.

The EEOC report noted the results of a 2003 study, which found “75 percent of employees who spoke out against workplace mistreatment faced some form of retaliation.”

Victims often avoid reporting the harassment, because they feel it’s the most “reasonable” course of action, another researcher found.

Indifference or trivialization in the organization, according to the report, can harm the victim “in terms of adverse job repercussions and psychological distress.”

These are just some of the risk factors associated with workplace harassment:

  • Workplaces with lack of diversity in terms of gender, race or ethnicity, age
  • Workplaces with extreme diversity
  • Workplaces with many young workers
  • Workplaces with significant power disparities, such as companies with executives, military member, plant managers
  • Service industries that rely on customer service or client satisfaction
  • Workplaces with monotonous or low-intensity tasks

In addition to being plain wrong, there’s a business case for stopping and preventing harassment.

The EEOC report found there are a multitude of financial costs associated with harassment complaints, such as time and resources dealing with litigation, settlements and damages.

Harassment can also lead to decreased workplace performance and productivity, reputational harm and increased turnover rates.

But the bottom line, according to the report, is: “Employers should care about preventing harassment because it is the right thing to do, and because stopping illegal harassment is required of them.”

You can read the full report at eeoc.gov.

Harvey Weinstein Accused of Sexual Harassment

New chairman to lead Vectren Dayton Air Show

Published: Monday, October 16, 2017 @ 9:26 AM
Updated: Monday, October 16, 2017 @ 10:24 AM


            Military aircraft fill the ramp at the Vectren Dayton Air Show. TY GREENLEES / STAFF FILE PHOTO
            Ty Greenlees
Military aircraft fill the ramp at the Vectren Dayton Air Show. TY GREENLEES / STAFF FILE PHOTO(Ty Greenlees)

A new chairman will take the controls of the Vectren Dayton Air Show.

Scott Buchanan, CEO of the Ohio Masonic Home in Springfield, was chosen as chairman of the U.S. Air and Trade Show, which operates the airshow. He replaces Michael Emoff, who was Dayton Air Show chairman between 2005 to 2017.

VIDEO: Highlights from the 2017 Vectren Dayton Air Show

Buchanan has been on the air show’s governing board since 2012, serving as both vice treasurer and a member of the executive committee. Buchanan has “extensive experience” in finance and management, organizers said.

Emoff was the longest serving chairman in the history of the air show.

“It’s hard to leave a post that you’re really comfortable in, but it’s just somebody else’s turn to enjoy this particular spot,” he said in an interview.

The outgoing chairman will remain on the board. He said changes under his tenure brought more stability to the air show as did canceling an unprofitable trade show at the expo center at Dayton International Airport in 2005 and 2006.

When he joined the board in 1999, he said, “We were not doing well. The shows were tough and sustainability was tough” and the trade show was struggling.

“When I took over, we started to build our way up to a much more manageable show,” he said. “Even in a bad show (with low attendance), we would break even or make money even without jet teams.”

RELATED: Thunderbirds cancel air show appearances

The air show has battled fluctuating attendance in recent years because of weather and most recently dealt with the unexpected cancellation of headline performers the Navy Blue Angels in 2016 after a team member’s fatal crash in Tennessee and the Air Force Thunderbirds in June after a jet mishap before the Dayton Air Show show injured a pilot at Dayton International Airport.

The Blue Angels are scheduled to return to the air show next year.

The weekend air show has about a $3 million economic impact and attracts up to 75,000 spectators a year.

Want to avoid getting hacked while driving? Check this out

Published: Sunday, October 15, 2017 @ 8:00 AM
Updated: Monday, October 16, 2017 @ 5:56 PM

David Barzilai, Karamba Security, co-founder & executive chairman
David Barzilai, Karamba Security, co-founder & executive chairman

Computers control an increasing number of vehicle functions now, and will do so even more in the future when autonomous — or self-driving — cars and trucks become more common. Given that technology in the vehicles we drive is ever increasing, how safe are we from cyber intruders? 

RELATED: The newest frontier for hackers: your car

David Barzilai, Chairman and co-founder of Karamba Security

“We’ve enabled hackers to gain access to the car by a small set of controllers. Once one of them is compromised then hackers can gain control of that controller and then manipulate the other controllers (and) start sending commands to the car. In essence we as drivers are now losing control. Because (hackers can cause the) car to stop on the highway, airbags may disengage, the steering wheel could start go to one direction or another without us having any control of it.”

RELATED: ‘Smart car’ technology may make roads safer, but some fear data hacks

Vance Saunders, director of the cybersecurity program at Wright State University

“The world has changed. Everything is so interconnected and with that comes the potential for bad things to happen. So therefore there is a responsibility for all auto manufacturers – it doesn’t mean just cars – people who make anything. It’s going to get connected to the internet and they have responsibility to address security because the environment that their products were being used in has changed.”

RELATED: Would you ride in a car with a brain?

Carla Bailo, assistant vice president for mobility research and business development at Ohio State University

“(Safeguards are needed) to protect the data. To ensure that these products are not hacked. That the bad guys won’t try do something either to the vehicle or infrastructure. Because either way it can create dire consequences.”

Carla Bailo Assistant Vice President Mobility Research and Business Development at Ohio State University(HANDOUT/Handout)

RELATED: Experts say self-driving cars will save lives: Would you ride in one?

Seth Hamman, assistant professor of computer science Cedarville University

“It will be a long time before they exhaust all of their attack vectors….There’s no shortage of different avenues to try.”

RELATED: Experts say self-driving cars will save lives: Would you ride in one?

C. Emre Koksal, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Ohio State University

“One way to cause chaos is to go out there and inject fake messages (into vehicle computers).”

Monument battle raging in Texas, threatening to reshape how people remember the Alamo

Published: Monday, October 16, 2017 @ 5:55 PM

The Alamo (Photo by Jill Torrance/Getty Images)
Jill Torrance/Getty Images
The Alamo (Photo by Jill Torrance/Getty Images)(Jill Torrance/Getty Images)

A new battle is raging at the Alamo — between protesters and a master plan committee that is determined to reshape the battleground to fit their vision.

>> Read more trending news

Outside the Alamo gates, a 60-foot monument called a cenotaph memorializes those who fought in Texas’ most notable battle. The monument includes individual carvings of those who fought in the battle for the Alamo, along with a list of names.

The popular attraction, situated near the Alamo itself, goes a long way in fulfilling Texans’ promise to “Remember the Alamo!”

However, a committee plans to remove the cenotaph to make the area surrounding the battleground look more “historic” as it would have appeared at the time of the battle.

Protesters descended on the monument this past Saturday to fight its removal, carrying signs that said “Save the Alamo” and “Don’t move the cenotaph!”

“I’m a Texan at heart and I think it’s important that it remains where it’s at,” said protester Jaime Mendez.

The committee, made up largely of city leaders, say they would move the monument to a nearby location.

>> RELATED: Dive into Texas tales with these stories from the Lone Star State

“The Cenotaph is always going to remain,” Assistant City Manager Lori Houston told My San Antonio. “But no final decision on its location has been made.”

While the master plan committee says they are returning the site to its historic look, they also plan to turn part of the Alamo into a park and museum.