Monroe police bust prostitution operation

Published: Friday, September 21, 2012 @ 6:43 PM
Updated: Friday, September 21, 2012 @ 6:43 PM

A prostitution operation police say was operating out of house in a Lemon Twp. subdivision was busted Friday afternoon by an undercover detective.

Monroe police received a tip about suggestive ads posted on a website listing the location as “Monroe, Middletown and Trenton.” A check of the web site turned up daily ads posted by two women who offered services together, according to Detective Gregg Myers.

“I placed a phone call and scheduled a time,” Myers said.

The detective said he made contact with a woman who said she was Katy who said both girls were available for $200 for full services. She stated there would be no kissing and a condom had to to be worn, according to the police report.

When Myers arrived at the door of 517 Diamond Loop, he was let in the door and the two women allegedly discussed price and sex actions. Myers then signaled for police to respond.

Alicia Cope, 26, 517 Diamond Loop, and Jamie Waybright, 22, 219 E. Circle Drive, Mason, were both charged with solicitation, a third-degree misdemeanor. They were transported to the Middletown City Jail.

Myers said the women indicated they had offered solicitation for about a month. One of the women said that there were usually about six clients a day, Myers said.

While the woman were negotiating prices with the detective, two children, ages 7 and 3, were present with two other adults, Myers said. Butler County Children Services was called to investigate.

The house is located in a usually quiet subdivision just outside Middletown and not typically a problem area of police.

Myers said, “there are no limits to good and bad neighborhoods. It can happen anywhere.”

Warren Co. teen reportedly suffers serious injuries following dog attack

Published: Saturday, September 23, 2017 @ 1:16 PM

Warren County Chief Dog Warden, Nathan Harper, right, and Deputy Dog Warden, Eric Hancock, keep a close eye on Warren County strays. Jim Noelker/Dayton Daily News
Warren County Chief Dog Warden, Nathan Harper, right, and Deputy Dog Warden, Eric Hancock, keep a close eye on Warren County strays. Jim Noelker/Dayton Daily News

Police are responding to a Ridgeville home after a teen was reporteldy bitten by a pit bull Saturday afternoon.

Crews were sent to the 6400 block of West Street after a caller reported a 16-year-old girl had suffered a dog bite. 

Initial reports indicate a family member is driving the teen to the hospital while the dog warden is called to the house. 

The teen's injuries have been described as significant, according to scanner traffic. 

Initial reports indicate the dog has attacked a family member in the past. 

Our newsroom is working to confirm multiple details in this developing story.

GOT A TIP? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

Roger Goodell calls Trump’s attack on NFL players’ protests ‘divisive’

Published: Saturday, September 23, 2017 @ 12:46 PM

Donald Trump and Roger Goodell attend the NY Jets kickoff luncheon party at Cipriani Wall Street on August 27, 2008 in New York. 
Al Pereira/Getty Images
Donald Trump and Roger Goodell attend the NY Jets kickoff luncheon party at Cipriani Wall Street on August 27, 2008 in New York. (Al Pereira/Getty Images)

National Football League Commissioner Roger Goodell has called President Donald Trump’s comments on NFL players’ national anthem protests, “divisive.”

>> Read more trending news

"The NFL and our players are at our best when we help create a sense of unity in our country and our culture,” Goodell said in a statement Saturday morning.

“There is no better example than the amazing response from our clubs and players to the terrible natural disasters we've experienced over the last month," he said.

Trump, speaking at a political rally in Alabama Friday night, used profane language while calling on the NFL to fire players protesting racial injustice by kneeling during the national anthem.

“Wouldn’t you love one of the NFL owners, when someone disrespects our flag, to say, ‘Get that son of a (expletive) off the field right now? Out. He’s fired!’” Trump said.

Goodell said Trump’s comments show an ignorance of what the NFL stands for and what it means to be a football player.

"Divisive comments like these demonstrate an unfortunate lack of respect for the NFL, our great game and all of our players, and a failure to understand the overwhelming force for good our clubs and players represent in our communities," the commissioner said.

Trump also blamed the protests for lower NFL ratings this season, contending that they have negatively affected the game.

>> Related: Donald Trump says NFL national anthem protesters should be ‘off the field’ and fired

Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick first started kneeling during the national anthem last year to protest police violence against minorities. Since then other NFL players have joined in the protests, and players in other sports have, too.

 

Miami Twp. demolitions aim to protect property values, fight blight

Published: Saturday, September 23, 2017 @ 1:16 PM


            This home in the Chautauqua neighborhood in Miami Twp. was one of two demolished last month through the township’s partnership with the Montgomery County Land Bank. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
This home in the Chautauqua neighborhood in Miami Twp. was one of two demolished last month through the township’s partnership with the Montgomery County Land Bank. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Miami Twp. is in the process of demolishing a series of properties as part of project to limit community blight.

Two homes in the Chautauqua neighborhood were initial targets and the township has identified six other sites as part of a program with the Montgomery County Land Bank.

The land bank assists with tax foreclosure and demolition through the Neighborhood Initiative Program secured funding of up to $25,000 per property.

RELATED: County awaits millions to help fight blight

The partnership with the land bank, which began last year, is part of the township’s strategic plan to eliminate blight and increase property values.

“Our goal is to get these properties back in the hands of dedicated homeowners who will maintain the properties and help their neighborhoods thrive,” said Chris Snyder, Miami Twp. community development director.

The two Chautauqua sites - 6022 Third Ave. and 6049 Second St. - were demolished in August after being empty and deteriorated for years, according to the township. Six other sites will follow, officials said.

Liberty Twp. teen center builds 1st youth garden

Published: Saturday, September 23, 2017 @ 1:00 PM

Lakota students from the Edge Teen Center in Liberty Twp. have started construction of the youth center’s first garden. The garden will be planted in early spring and vegetables and herbs harvested will be used to teach teens healthy cook and eating habits. MICHAEL D. CLARK/STAFF
Lakota students from the Edge Teen Center in Liberty Twp. have started construction of the youth center’s first garden. The garden will be planted in early spring and vegetables and herbs harvested will be used to teach teens healthy cook and eating habits. MICHAEL D. CLARK/STAFF

You can’t grow a garden until you build a garden.

That’s just one of the many lessons Lakota teens are learning as the popular Edge Teen Center took its after-school activities outside to create the center’s first student-run garden.

MORE: After school teens: Where they go, what they do

The first-ever garden at the Liberty Twp. youth center — located adjacent to the Lakota East High School — will produce vegetables next spring that will be used in cooking classes.

Annie Droege, director of the Edge Teen Center, said the project will become a new staple of the teen facility, where an average after-school session has more than a 100 area students relax on couches, study their homework at tables, play games or socialize as many of them wait for their parents to come give them a ride home.

“We felt the garden would be a great focal point for the community service portion of the center,” said Droege, as she paused from watching teens build the wooden, elevated garden.

“We wanted a project the students could get behind and build community and what better way than to build a community garden here right next to our facility,” she said.

MORE: Ex-Lakota coach to help lead new Boys & Girls Club in West Chester

“We hope to plant vegetables, herbs and any fruit we can grow so we can start doing healthy cooking classes and teach students basic ways of gardening. It’s a really good teaching method for them to learn they can take from the garden to the dinner table,” said Droege.

Lakota students from the Edge Teen Center in Liberty Twp. have started construction of the youth center’s first garden. The garden will be planted in early spring and vegetables and herbs harvested will be used to teach teens healthy cook and eating habits. MICHAEL D. CLARK/STAFF(Staff Writer)

The Edge Center is one of the few dedicated teen facilities in Butler County.

Teens who don’t work jobs after school often lack a place to gather in a constructive fashion.

According to the Washington, D.C.-based Afterschool Alliance, communities across the United States see more than 11.3 million children without supervision between the hours of 3 and 6 p.m.

MORE: The 4 essays that helped Butler County quadruplet brothers get into Ivy League schools

The project costs about $500 so far and Mabry Lawn Care is serving as the project director. Funding comes from the Butler County United Way, which is also offering adult volunteers. The YWCA is providing volunteers to help the students build a garden scarecrow.

Lakota East sophomore Abilene Keating paused from helping dig out the garden and said, “I’m really excited about the spring.”

“It’ll be good to have all these vegetables and fruits. I love to cook so being able to do that with fresh food will be great,” said Keating.

Teens who participate in the gardening, maintenance and growing will also earn school community service hours.