Milestone events at Wright-Patterson in 2016

Published: Friday, January 06, 2017 @ 11:33 AM


            Maj. Gen. Robert D. Mc-Murry Jr. assumes command May 13 of the Air Force Research Laboratory, headquartered at Wright-Patterson AFB.
Maj. Gen. Robert D. Mc-Murry Jr. assumes command May 13 of the Air Force Research Laboratory, headquartered at Wright-Patterson AFB.

Throughout 2016, there were many significant milestones achieved by numerous organizations across Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Here are some of the milestones and events tat Wright-Patterson

Milestones

Maj. Gen. Robert D. Mc-Murry Jr. assumes command May 13 of the Air Force Research Laboratory, headquartered at Wright-Patterson AFB. Maj. Gen. Thomas Masiello retires after a 35-year active-duty career. Air Force officials announce in September that Mc-Murry is nominated for promotion to lieutenant general and in 2017 will become the commander of the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center headquartered at Wright-Patterson AFB. Lt. Gen. John F. Thompson, current AFLCMC commander, is nominated for assignment as commander, Space and Missile Systems Center, Air Force Space Command, Los Angeles Air Force Base, California.

Col. Bradley McDonald assumes command of the 88th Air Base Wing July 17; former commander Col. John Devillier becomes the special assistant to the Director of the Joint Chiefs of Staff for General Officer Matters at the Pentagon.

Events

The aircraft that served as Air Force One on the day of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, nine other presidential aircraft and a world-class collection of flight test aircraft, along with space artifacts and cargo planes, are part of National Museum of the U.S. Air Force’s new fourth building. A ceremonial ribbon-cutting event officially opens the new building to the public June 8. The $40.8 million, 224,000-square-foot fourth building, which was privately financed by the Air Force Museum Foundation, houses more than 70 aircraft, missiles and space vehicles in four new galleries – Presidential, Research and Development, Space and Global Reach. The building also houses three science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) Learning Nodes – dedicated, interactive educational spaces to accommodate student-centered, technology-enhanced learning through hands-on programs, demonstrations and lectures.

■ The 2016 Air Force Marathon on Sept. 17 and accompanying races are held for the 20th time; the turnout of more than 15,000 people running in and supporting the races brings together base personnel and community volunteers. The AF Marathon Office unveils a new logo honoring its 35 Stars – runners who have completed every race since the event started in 1997. Tailwind is named the official mascot of the Air Force Marathon and makes his first appearance.

■ Lt. Gen. John F. Thompson opens the inaugural Life Cycle Industry Days, citing the need to “out-innovate” the nation’s collective enemies. The three-day symposium offers presentations by senior Air Force and industry leaders along with themed breakout sessions centered on cyber and other issues. Situated on the University of Dayton River Campus, which was formerly world headquarters for National Cash Register Co., the symposium’s site was perhaps a fitting location for academia, industry and the government acquisition workforce to come together, as Thompson says, “to foster current relationships plus forge new ones.”

■ AFRL hosts the 2016 AFRL Commanders Challenge event Dec. 9-16 in Las Vegas at the Nevada National Security Site. Teams from six bases, including Wright-Patterson AFB, had six months and $50,000 to develop a solution that could sense, predict, intercept, deny and recover an unmanned aerial system. At the conclusion of the event it is announced that Wright-Patterson AFB and Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland are awarded the trophy for the best system in a first-ever tie for the competition.

Man accelerates to cross rising drawbridge, lands safely on other side

Published: Sunday, August 20, 2017 @ 9:04 AM

Drawbridge Starts Rising As Man Crosses With His Family

A man driving to Cape May with his family had to accelerate when a drawbridge abruptly starting rising beneath their vehicle, police said.

>> Read more trending news

Terence Naphys was driving with his wife, daughter and her friend when the Middle Thorofare Bridge lifted three to six feet as their RAV4 crossed, according to WRC.

So Naphys accelerated and jumped the gap.

"It's scary what's going through your mind," Naphys told WRC. "We could have all landed in the water."

However, they landed safely on the other side of the 65-foot-tall bridge and were able to drive away without injury. The car sustained about $10,000 in damage, including a bent suspension.

The incident was due to operator error on the part of the bridge tender, police said. The operator was blinded by the glare of the sun. When he checked the bridge for cars, he thought Naphys’ vehicle would cross before the bridge lifted.

The bridge was rising to allow a commercial fishing boat, which did not have working radio communication at the time, to pass.

Although uninjured, Naphys is scared to cross another drawbridge.

"I will never, ever drive that bridge or probably any drawbridge again," he said.

Study shows thousands of crashes in Ohio caused by debris on roadways

Published: Sunday, August 20, 2017 @ 8:00 AM


            Unsecured loads that spill onto Ohio’s highways result in on average 20 highway fatalities a year and five times as many serious injuries. The cost to clean up also runs into the millions. CHRIS STEWART / STAFF
Unsecured loads that spill onto Ohio’s highways result in on average 20 highway fatalities a year and five times as many serious injuries. The cost to clean up also runs into the millions. CHRIS STEWART / STAFF

Debris on Ohio’s highways — overwhelmingly the result of unsecured loads — results in an average 20 highway fatalities a year and five times as many serious injuries, according to state accident reports.

The cost to taxpayers: millions.

“It is an ugly problem, but it can also be a dangerous problem,” said Matt Bruning, Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) spokesman.

Between 2012 and 2016, more than 18,700 crashes on state roadways were set in motion by debris, according to state accident data. The result: 102 people dead and another 569 were seriously injured.

RELATED: Truck loses load on ramp; who pays for damage?

Although the numbers represent a relatively minor fraction of the state’s crashes — about 1 percent — they are among the easiest to prevent by taking simple precautions, Bruning said.

“When you’re hauling a load of scrap, or a load of trash, or even picking up new furniture at the store or a mattress, you really need to tie that down and put a tarp over it,” he said. “That’s what we’re really trying to get people to understand.”

Other motorists also need to take caution. Sgt. John Chesser of the Ohio State Highway Patrol’s Xenia Post said a toy truck once flew out of the bed of a pickup just ahead of him on Interstate 75. Chesser said he avoided a collision — or worse — because he’d given himself enough room.

“You need to give yourself a reactionary gap so you can protect yourself,” he said.

RELATED: Large trucks get the blame, but car drivers cause majority of wrecks

Over the past five years, Butler and Montgomery counties each recorded four fatalities due to road debris and Clark County reported 3.

Last year, 19 people across the state lost their lives after encountering debris.

“Those are 19 people that would be here today if it weren’t for someone carelessly hauling a piece of debris that flew out and caused a crash,” Bruning said.

Driving with an unsecured load on a state highway — which includes many routes through towns and cities — is illegal in Ohio.

With the exception of some farm vehicles transporting produce or agricultural production materials, as well as rubbish vehicles in the loading process, no vehicle is allowed on a highway without “a sufficient cover to prevent the load or any part of the load from spilling onto the highway.”

Every state has penalties for unsecure loads. Most call for fines ranging from $10 to $5,000, with the possibility in 16 states of serving time in jail, according to the United States Government Accountability Office. The penalty in Ohio, however, is not among the nation’s stiffest: a minor misdemeanor that includes a fine, but no jail time.

RELATED: Distracted driving could mean extra $100 fine in Ohio

Fines for an unsecured load typically vary from $120-160 depending on the jurisdiction, Chesser said.

More than a third of the deaths in road debris crashes result from a driver swerving to avoid hitting an object, according to an American Automobile Association (AAA) national study of fatalities between 2011 and 2014. The analysis showed about two-thirds of debris-related crashes resulted from items falling from a vehicle due to improper maintenance and unsecured loads.

RELATED: Study shows that more than 200,000 crashes are caused by road debris

Much of the debris — whether parts fallen off unmaintained vehicles, construction refuse or plain litter — eventually gets shoved to the side of the road, where it poses another problem for ODOT, Bruning said.

The department spends about $4 million a year picking up the roadside trash, and the sum is despite the use of inmate labor and Adopt-A-Highway volunteers, he said. Last year ODOT collected more than 440,000 bags of litter, or about 10 bags for every lane mile.

“We really just need people to pay attention when they are hauling things and make sure things are secure,” Bruning said. “The law aside, it’s the right thing to do.”

How to avoid debris while driving

  • Continually search the road 12 to 15 seconds ahead for debris.
  • Don’t tailgate and maintain at least 3 to 4 seconds of following distance so you can see potential objects in the road ahead easier.
  • If you see you are about to make contact with debris, such as a piece of tire, safely reduce your speed as much as possible prior to making contact.
  • When driving at dusk and dawn be especially alert for animals on or near the roadway.
  • Be aware of open space around your vehicle and maintain an open space to the front and at least one side of the vehicle at all times.

Source: American Automobile Association

By the numbers

18,700: Number of crashes on Ohio roadways set in motion by debris between 2012 and 2016.

102: Number of fatalities in those crashes.

19: Number fatalities last year alone.

440,000: Number of bags of litter picked up by ODOT.

Source: Ohio Department of Transportation

Florida sheriff urges residents to get guns, be prepared for mass shootings

Published: Thursday, June 22, 2017 @ 8:27 PM

Gun Safety Tips

A sheriff in Winter Haven, Florida, is asking people in his county to get a gun and be ready to fight back in case of a mass shooting.

“Become proficient. Get a concealed firearms license and carry it. And if you need to shoot somebody, shoot them a lot,” Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd told WFTS.

>> Read more trending news

The sheriff went on to say that people are responsible for their safety until authorities arrived at the scene.

Judd also said that people who carry out mass shootings are ready to die the moment they decide to attack.

Earlier this month, Brevard County Sheriff Wayne Ivey gained national attention when he posted a video on Facebook urging residents with valid concealed carry permits to be ready at all times.

He cited terrorist attacks around the world as the reason to be prepared.

Watch: Sheriff Wayne Ivey discusses gun preparedness

“The solution is if you're going to carry a gun, then go practice to save your life with it. If you're not someone who's comfortable carrying a gun, or don't believe you would be comfortable defending your life, then look for an alternative solution,” Ivey said, adding that the alternative could be pepper spray, a stun gun, or other type of weapon.

The controversial video was shared on Facebook more than 9,000 times.

Some law enforcement officials disagree with the advice given by Ivey and Judd. 

“That's ridiculous, absolutely ridiculous,” resident Mary Dailey told WFTS. “I'm all for your right to own a gun if you are a responsible person, but you should have to prove it.”

Judd said that running and hiding is not a bad option, but told WFTS “You’re responsible for protecting yourself until we arrive.”

“You can either stand there, as we’ve seen many times before, and be a victim, or you can fight back,” he said

What you need to know about the 2017 solar eclipse

Published: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 @ 3:43 PM
Updated: Saturday, August 19, 2017 @ 8:00 PM

What should I not do during the Great American Eclipse in the Miami Valley?

The Great American Eclipse will be visible across the country on Aug. 21. 

In the Miami Valley, the solar eclipse will begin shortly after 1 p.m. Aug. 21. It will take the moon almost three hours to cross the face of the sun, from one side to the other. 

RELATED: 7 things to know about the rare total solar eclipse 

RELATED: Solar Eclipse 2017: Read this before looking at the sun

Many cities across America will see a total eclipse, but our area will only have a partial eclipse. Almost 90 percent of the sun will be eclipsed by the moon. The last total solar eclipse that passed over the Miami Valley was more than a thousand years ago.

QUIZ: How much do you know about solar eclipses? 

VIDEO: How August’s solar eclipse will look in the Miami   

RELATED: How will your pets react to the solar eclipse?

Upcoming Total Solar Eclipse Stirs Fears of Apocalypse

The last total solar eclipse that was visible in the contiguous United States was on Feb. 26, 1979.  

#SkyWitness7 has a several resources for everything you need to know about the eclipse:

There won’t be a total solar eclipse in the Miami Valley. Here’s what you need to know to safely watch the Great American Eclipse

>> RELATED: How to get your free pair of Storm Center 7 solar eclipse glasses

The Great American Eclipse will be visible across the country in August. Watch this video to learn the when the eclipse will be visible in your community

A partial eclipse will start at 1:02 p.m. and end at 3:51 p.m. in Dayton on Aug. 21. Get more facts about the Great American Eclipse here

Check out the WHIO Space Glossary to learn the difference between an annular, hybrid and lunar eclipse. 

HAVE QUESTIONS? Ask the Storm Center 7 team through their Facebook and Twitter pages. This story will be updated daily with the latest questions from you! 

An even better eclipse coming in 2024 to the Miami Valley

Q: Can I watch it with a mirror? Is the reflection safe? A: That still isn’t a safe way to view the eclipse. Using a mirror reflection is just as dangerous as staring at the sun and will allow too much sunlight into your eye.

Q: What about 3D glasses from the movie that look like the solar eclipse glasses, can I use those? A: 3D glasses from the movies may look like some of the solar eclipse glasses but they too offer no protection. They aren’t made of the same filter. Only ISO compliant solar eclipse glasses have the proper solar filter to directly watch the eclipse. Solar eclipse glasses reduce the amount of sunlight down to a safe level for your eyes since the sun is so bright and also produces ultraviolet radiation that can cause permanent eye damage if you look at it with the wrong equipment. Remember, multiple pairs of sunglasses won’t work either. If you can’t get the proper solar eclipse glasses, watch it online with us on Aug 21st from 1-4 p.m. or make a pinhole projector. 

Q: If we are going to have a solar eclipse does it mean that those on the other side of earth will have a lunar eclipse? What will be happening in Australia during our solar eclipse? Do they experience it a day ahead of us?  A: A lunar eclipse occurs when the sun, earth and moon align. Earth moves in between the sun and the moon, blocking sunlight to the moon’s surface. This will not be the case this time around as the orbit of the moon will pass between the sun and earth creating a solar eclipse instead. Because the moon’s orbit is titled, as it continues its path around the earth it will move out of the direct alignment with the sun, ending the eclipse. At the time of the eclipse in the U.S., it will be night in Australia. They will have a dark sky, but no moon as the moon is on our side of the globe. This also means it’s not possible for them to have a lunar eclipse. In order for that to happen the moon would have to be on the Australia side with Earth traveling between the moon and the sun.

Q: What are chances that we will have cloudy skies on eclipse day?

A: During summer, there’s always is a good chance that clouds could develop during the heat of the day. The solar eclipse will occur between 1:02 p.m. and 3:51 p.m. in Dayton. Based on historical cloudiness data from the NOAA National Center for Environmetal Information 10-year hourly climate normals dataset, there is a 20 percent chance of an overcast day. Anything less should allow for better conditions to see the eclipse at some point.

>> Download the FREE Storm Center 7 app

Q: How will shadows look during the solar eclipse? 

A: Your shadow on a normal day will show your general shape. During a solar eclipse, a partial one like we will see, the light from the sun will be more focused (about a sliver will remain during max eclipse). This allows the sunlight to come from a smaller source and your shadow to become more defined. According to Rick Fienberg, from the American Astronomical Society, you can see such a sharp image of your shadow that the arms on your hair will be visible. Another interesting thing you could see because we won’t be in the path of totality is objects like trees casting crescent shaped shadows. Like a pinhole projector, the hole between leaves on a tree act to project the solar eclipse on the ground creating crescent shaped shadows! Here’s an example from NASA’s picture of the day

Q: What happens more often -- solar or lunar eclipses? 

A: Solar eclipses are fairly numerous, about two to four per year, but the area on the ground covered by totality is only about 50 miles wide. In any given location on Earth, a total eclipse happens only once every hundred years or so. However, for some "lucky" locations they can occur as little as a few years apart. An example is the Aug. 21, 2017 and April 8, 2024, eclipses, which will be viewed at the same spot near Carbondale, Illinois. The eclipse will also be total in the Miami Valley in 2024. Eclipses of the Moon by the Earth's shadow are actually less numerous than solar eclipses; however, each lunar eclipse is visible from over half the Earth. At any given location, you can have up to three lunar eclipses per year, but some years there may be none. In any one calendar year, the maximum number of eclipses is four solar and three lunar.

Q: How do I know if my solar eclipse glasses are safe to use?

A: You will want to make sure you are using solar eclipse glasses or a viewfinder only, says Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini. Sunglasses, 3D movie glasses or anything else will not be safe enough to view the solar eclipse with.

When you have glasses make sure that they have an “ISO” icon on them and that they have this sequence of numbers (ISO 12312-2). You also want to check the manufacturer. Some popular companies that certify their glasses include, Rainbow Symphony, American Paper Optics, Thousand Oaks Optical or TSE 17.

Making sure you get them directly through the manufacturer, a local library or from one of the WHIO giveaways will help to ensure you indeed have the right type of solar eclipse glasses.

If you can’t get glasses in time you can enjoy the eclipse by watching live videos from 1 to 4 p.m. Aug. 21 on WHIO-TV, online at whio.com and on the WHIO Facebook page. Also, learn how to make your own viewfinder here.

Q: Is it true there is another, better eclipse coming to Dayton?

A: Yes! If we miss the eclipse on Aug. 21, we won’t have to wait to long to get another shot. The next eclipse will be even better for Dayton as it will be a total solar eclipse in our area. It will occur on April 8, 2024 and if the skies are clear (that’s a big if), it should be spectacular as it will occur right around lunchtime! So set your alarm or mark your calendars!

Q: Are there different types of solar eclipses? 

A: Yes. A total solar eclipse (like the one Aug. 21) occurs when the sun, moon and Earth are directly in line. The people in the center of the moons shadow along its path from coast to coast will see the moon completely block the sun and it will get darker for a few minutes. A partial solar eclipse occurs when the sun, moon and Earth aren’t perfectly in line. This allows the moon to still obstruct the sun’s surface but only part of it. Finally, an annular solar eclipse still needs a line-up of the sun, moon and earth but this time the moon is farthest from the Earth. This means that the moon looks smaller from our perspective and will cover the sun but appear to leave a ring of brightness around it. You can read more about them here.

Q: Will gravity change that day?  

A: As crazy as it sounds, yes the gravitational force felt here on Earth will be different during the solar eclipse on Aug. 21. According to NASA, the average person will feel about 1.7 ounces lighter because the moon and sun will have a gravitational pull in the same direction, which will be opposite the Earth’s gravitational force.

Q: How long will the solar eclipse last when watching in the Miami Valley?

A: In Dayton, the moon will begin to eclipse the sun around 1:02 p.m. Then, the maximum eclipse or when the moon will cover most of the sun (about 89 percent in Dayton) is at 2:28 p.m. The eclipse will end around 3:51 p.m. This will make the eclipse about two hours and 50 minutes from start to finish. You can get the timing of the eclipse down to the second by finding your city right here.

Q: Where is the best place within 50 miles of Dayton to see the eclipse?

A: The farther southwest you go, the greater the eclipse will be. However, there will not be much variability within 50 miles of Dayton. For example, the sun will be eclipsed by the moon by approximately 89 percent in Dayton. In Cincinnati, it will be 91 percent eclipsed. You would have to travel to southwestern Kentucky or middle Tennessee to see the total eclipse. Keep in mind, experts are warning of extremely heavy traffic on the day of the eclipse thanks to the “eclipse-chasers,” so be prepared! For details on the eclipse and its start, peak and end times in your part of the Miami Valley, go to whio.com and click on #SkyWitness7 

Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini talks about the timing of the eclipse

Q: What time does a solar eclipse occur? 

A: A solar eclipse happens only when a new moon occurs for the month and the orbit of the moon lines up between the Earth and the sun just right to produce a shadow on the Earth. We have a new moon each month but not always a solar eclipse because of the moon’s orbit. Each solar eclipse begins around sunrise at some point in the path and ends around sunset in a different location at the end of the path. Specific timing of what you see depends on your location. In Dayton,  the max eclipse time will be around 2:28 p.m. The next total solar eclipse in the U.S. is April 8, 2024. 

You can find the specific timing of the start, max and end of the eclipse in YOUR city by clicking here.

Q: What makes this a total solar eclipse? 

A: The Great American Solar Eclipse on Aug. 21 will be a total eclipse, which means the sun will be completely covered by the moon. There are usually 2 and up to 5 solar eclipses every year, but they are usually not total. But on Aug. 21, parts of the country will be in the path of totality, meaning that the sun will be completely covered. In the path of totality, it will be safe to look directly at the sun. Outside of the path of totality, which is where we are, it is NOT safe to look directly at the sun.

Q: Will there be a temperature change when the solar eclipse happens?

A: Yes. As the moon moves in front of the sun, there will be a noticeable change in temperature. It will get darker and feel cooler because the sun’s rays will be blocked by the moon.

Q: Can we look directly at the eclipse or do we need special glasses?  

A: Because we will not be in the path of totality in the Miami Valley, it is not safe to look directly at the eclipse, even during the maximum locally. We will get about an 89 percent eclipse, meaning the moon will cover 89 percent of the sun. This means that roughly 11 percent of the sun will still shine during the maximum. The best way you can see the eclipse is with special glasses or by creating your own viewfinder. 

Q: Do I need a special filter for my camera to take pictures or video fof the eclipse?

A: While there are different makes and models of cameras, the short answer is yes. Most cameras are not made to shoot the sun directly. The best option is to get a filter that will fit your camera to safely shoot the eclipse. Without a filter, you run the risk of damaging your device. As for what kind of filter you need, the best thing to do is contact the manufacturer and see what filter they recommend.

Q: What is the umbra and penumbra? 

A: The umbra and penumbra are different parts of the shadow created by the eclipse. In the case of the Great American Solar Eclipse, the umbra is the shadow that is darkest and is what creates the path of totality. The penumbra is what everyone outside of the path of totality in the continental United States will see during the eclipse.

Q: If we have a solar eclipse, does it mean that those on the other side of Earth have a lunar eclipse? What will be happening in Australia during our solar eclipse?

A: A lunar eclipse occurs when the sun, Earth and moon align. Earth moves in between the sun and moon, blocking sunlight to the moon. This will not be the case this time as the orbit of the moon will pass between the sun and Earth, creating a solar eclipse intead. Because the moon’s orbit is tilted, as it continues its path around Earth it will move out of the direct alignment with the sun, ending the eclipse. During the eclipse in the U.S., it will be night in Australia. They will have a dark sky, but no moon as the moon is on our side of the globe. This also mean’s it’s not possible for them to have a lunar eclipse.

Q. What should I not do during the Great American Eclipse?

A. Here’s a list of DO NOTs dor the Great American Eclipse:

  • Don’t look directly at the sun without the proper eye protection, even during the maximum.
  • Don’t photograph the eclipse without the proper filter for your camera or smartphone. 
  • Don’t forget the times. It starts at 1:02 p.m., maxes at 2:28 p.m. and ends at 3:51 p.m. in Dayton. 
  • Don’t spend too much time photographing the event. Take time to enjoy and take in this rare event; a lot of photos will be available on social media. 
  • Don’t look at the eclipse while driving. This poses a danger to not only you, but to others around you. 
  • Don’t forget to charge your device prior to the event. 
  • Don’t forget that traffic jams may occur the afternoon, even in places that are not in the path of totality. 
  • Don’t be sad or upset that we’re not in the path of totality. We will be in April 2024. 
  • Don’t worry about NOT seeing the eclipse if there are clouds. We have you covered with our facebook live/live stream on WHIO.com.