Middletown may restart Citizen Police Academy

Published: Monday, March 20, 2017 @ 4:52 PM


            Participants in Hamilton Police Department’s Hispanic Police Academy learn about firearms safety. The Middletown Police Department is planning to restart its Citizen Police Academy in 2018. CONTRIBUTED
Participants in Hamilton Police Department’s Hispanic Police Academy learn about firearms safety. The Middletown Police Department is planning to restart its Citizen Police Academy in 2018. CONTRIBUTED

A Facebook post that inquired how many people in Middletown would be interested in participating in a Citizen Police Academy has already resulted in more than two dozen people interested in signing up.

Lt. Jimmy Cunningham said police Chief Rodney Muterspaw posted the inquiry last week on the Middletown Division of Police’s Facebook page.

“It’s going to happen in early 2018,” Cunningham said.

RELATED: Middletown’s revamped Neighborhood Watch wants to hear your concerns

He said the last time Middletown police hosted a citizen police academy was about 10 years ago. Since then, he said budget cuts and lack of community interest were two reasons why the department has not hosted an academy.

“It shows transparency and gives the community an idea of what goes on in the police department,” he said.

Cunningham said the program runs six to eight weeks on a weeknight and those who participate learn more about police procedures, policies and tactics as well as going on a ride-along with a patrol officer and spending some time at the police shooting range getting familiar with weapons. Participants will also learn about making traffic stops as well as how evidence is collected and how criminal investigations are handled.

He said the department’s instructors teach the various classes during the citizen police academy.

RELATED: 18 graduate Hamilton’s Hispanic Citizens Police Academy

Cunningham said about 20 people are accepted in a class, but that the details and participation costs are still being worked out. He said more information will be coming later this year.

“It’s a great community tool and gives police a chance to give back to the community,” he said.

Other area communities such as Trenton, Monroe, Hamilton, Fairfield Twp., and West Chester Twp. have hosted citizen police academies in the past several years.

Power outage ends for most near Miami Valley Hospital, UD student neighborhoods

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 7:17 PM
Updated: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 7:41 PM

Brown Street loses power

UPDATE @ 7:39 p.m.:  The DP&L online outage map now shows 126 customers without power along Brown Street, near Miami Valley Hospital and the UD student neighborhoods, from Chambers Street to U.S. 35. 

A hospital administrator at MVH said the hospital is operating on generator power. 

Elevators there stopped immediately when the outage struck about 6:45 p.m., she said. Workers and security were able to get everyone off the cars, she said. 

No patients were put in danger because of the outage, she said.

INITIAL REPORT

Hundreds of businesses and residences along Brown Street, near Miami Valley Hospital and the University of Dayton student neighborhoods, are without power. 

According to the Dayton Power & Light online outage map, nearly 1,200 customers are affected. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Guest lists being checked to track drug dealers

Calls began coming into the newsroom just before 7 p.m. 

We’re hearing the outage extends along Brown Street, from Chambers Street west to U.S. 35. 

Jimmy’s Ladder 11, in the 900 block of Brown, and Subway, in the 1100 block, are among the businesses in the dark. 

We have a call into DP&L for details about the possible cause of the outage.

Stay with whio.com for breaking news.

Everything you need to know in the event of a government shutdown

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 6:41 PM

What You Need to Know: Government Shutdown

The fight over a border wall, the fate of nearly 800,000 DACA recipients, and the wrangling over the funding of an insurance program for children could force a U.S. government shutdown after midnight on Friday if Congress does not pass legislation that would keep the government up and running.

A government shutdown doesn’t mean the government completely shuts down. Employees and services deemed “essential” would remain in place. Here’s a breakdown.

Will a shutdown delay my tax refund?

Wright Patt: Workers to show up Monday even if shutdown occurs

What happens to veterans?

Will I get my mail?

Could travel plans be impacted?

Wright Patt: Workers to show up Monday even if shutdown occurs

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 5:46 PM


            Wright-Patterson Air Force Base employs more than 27,000 employees and is the largest single-site employer in Ohio. The base has a $4.1 billion economic impact in Ohio. TY GREENLEES / STAFF
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base employs more than 27,000 employees and is the largest single-site employer in Ohio. The base has a $4.1 billion economic impact in Ohio. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

Thousands of Wright-Patterson employees were expected to report to work Monday morning for further instructions “to carry out orderly shutdown activities” if a partial federal government closure stuck at midnight Friday, base authorities said.

The scenario could be a replay of October 2013 when most civil service employees at Wright-Patterson were sent home on furlough at the state’s largest single-site employer with more than 27,000 personnel, but how many might be impacted in another temporary closure could not be answered Friday.

“It is difficult to determine how many employees would be impacted because a determination of the furlough parameters has not been released,” base spokeswoman Marie Vanover said in an email.

All military personnel, regardless of their job, would report for duty, according to the Defense Department.

RELATED: Threat of government shutdown wearing on workers

Those who stay on the job — both military and civilian — will not be paid until a Congressional appropriations bill is passed, according to the Pentagon. The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force planned to remain open over the weekend unless it receives a shutdown order, according to spokeswoman Diana Bachert. She said the museum would issue an update to the news media, and post an alert on the museum’s social media sites and its website if it must close.

Retired Col. Cassie B. Barlow, installation commander of Wright-Patterson the last time a shutdown hit, said Friday carrying out shutdown activities were “very complex” and “all encompassing.”

“I feel sorry for the folks on the base right now and what they have to go through,” she said. “It’s very frustrating. It’s frustrating for the commanders, but it’s also frustrating for all of the employees because they are starved for information right now and they’re listening to the news …

“It’s a stressful time especially when there’s a potential to not get paid,” she said, adding it was “no way” to treat employees or run a business.

The Pentagon issued a contingency plan Friday that listed broad categories where employees may be allowed to stay on the job, such as police, fire and medical services and other duties deemed “essential” to national security.

RELATED: What if a government shutdown happened: Five things to know

The reverberations of a government shutdown would be similar to the last one struck in 2013, according to Air Force Capt. Hope Cronin.

“We are hopeful that there is enough time for Congress to prevent a lapse in appropriations,” she said Friday afternoon. “However, at this time, we must plan for a range of scenarios” that include a short-term stopgap funding measure, a budget deal or a shutdown.

Air Force reservists were expected to attend a previously funded drill weekend Saturday and Sunday at the base with the 445th Airlift Wing, said spokeswoman Lt. Col. Cynthia Harris.

Among other impacts, U.S. District Court in Dayton would remain open, federal Judge Walter Rice said Friday. “I don’t expect any immediate change,” he said.

RELATED: Will a shutdown happen? Wright-Patterson in holding pattern

The U.S. Postal Service mail delivery and post offices would stay open and Social Security payments would continue to recipients, according to authorities.

The Ohio National Guard issued a statement Friday saying the agency would continue national defense operations and respond to state emergencies.

At the University of Dayton Research Institute, which has millions of dollars in federal contracts employing some 200 people, some employees may be prevented from doing their jobs and the institute “would need to find other work for them as possible,” John Leland, UDRI executive director, said in a statement. “Other contract work might have to shift temporarily shift from a government installation to a UD facility.”

Those changes are “disruptive” and “causes waste at taxpayer expense,” he added.

Head Start education programs for pre-schoolers were expected to be open Monday if a shutdown occurred, but a long-term government closure may have an impact on operations, according to Barbara Haxton, executive director of the Ohio Head State Association in Dayton.

Warming trend to last through the weekend

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 4:12 AM
Updated: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 6:54 PM

Flooding concerns increase with snowmelt and rain this weekend.

A gradual warm-up will continue through the weekend and into the start of next week, according to Storm Center 7 Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell. 

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

  • Some refreeze possible tonight
  • Temperatures climb into the 40s this weekend
  • Wet, but mild start to next week

>> WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

DETAILED FORECAST

Tonight: Mainly clear skies are expected through the evening. Breezy conditions and chilly as temperatures fall through the 30s towards an overnight low in the upper 20s.

5 Day Forecast with Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell

>> 4 tricks to help avoid illness during big temperature changes

Saturday: Sunshine to start the day, but clouds will increase late, Elwell said. It will be breezy at times with highs in the lower to middle 40s.

Sunday: Lots of clouds are expected during the day with a chance for drizzle or light rain and fog. Highs will be in the middle 40s.

>> Another eclipse is on the way, featuring a ‘Blood Moon’

Monday: Rain will be likely, especially in the afternoon. Gusty winds will also be likely with highs in the lower 50s. 

Tuesday: Colder air returns with blustery, cloudy conditions. A few passing flurries or snow showers are possible with highs in the middle 30s.

>> WHIO Weather App

Wednesday: Some sunshine returns but it will stay chilly. Highs will be in the upper 30s