UPDATE:


Miamisburg seeks contractor to oversee $69 million water, sewer plan

Published: Monday, March 20, 2017 @ 2:18 PM


            The Miamisburg City Council will be asked Tuesday night to approve legislation allowing a contracted firm to be the project manager of the city’s $69 million water and sewer master plan. NICK BLIZZARD/STAFF
The Miamisburg City Council will be asked Tuesday night to approve legislation allowing a contracted firm to be the project manager of the city’s $69 million water and sewer master plan. NICK BLIZZARD/STAFF

Miamisburg’s $69 million water and sewer master plan may fall under the purview of a contracted firm after the resignation of the project manager in the midst of the city’s five-year infrastructure upgrades.

RELATED: Miamisburg customers question accuracy of water bills

A proposal before Miamisburg City Council on Tuesday night would give a local engineering company oversight of the citywide improvements, which are being paid for by annual rate hikes that have drawn criticism in recent months.

RELATED: Lead discovery halts pumping station work, EPA involved

The December resignation of Project Manager Steve Morrison prompted city administrators to propose Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon assume management of the water and sewer upgrades.

Baby’s body found hidden in storage containers

Published: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 9:24 AM

FILE PHOTO
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
FILE PHOTO(Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

A shocking discovery in a South Carolina apartment building has police and investigators dealing with an unimaginable case. They have to determine what happened to a baby that led to its death, and find out why someone would put the baby’s body in not one, but two containers, WSPA reported.

>> Read more trending news

A sheriff’s deputy was at the apartment in Fountain Inn, South Carolina, to serve eviction papers. That’s when the baby’s remains were found, sealed in two containers and left in a bedroom.

No one has been charged yet, but police are awaiting autopsy results.

"The landlord was coming down and she was just crying,” apartment building resident Bianca Jackson told WSPA. “I’m like ‘Miss Reina, what’s wrong?’ And she was like ‘Bianca, there’s a dead baby up there.’”

Police officers who are investigating the baby’s death are able to get counseling.

“It’s very sad and very difficult for officers and investigators to have to go in and do their job and determine what took place,” Fountain Inn Police Capt. Michael Hamilton told WSPA.

Fire causes significant damage to Dayton house

Published: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 8:41 AM
Updated: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 9:35 AM

Dayton fire fighters are battling a house fire on Anna

UPDATE @ 9:35 a.m. 

Investigators believe a fire that significantly damaged a house on Anna Street in Dayton is suspicious. 

TRENDING: Four juveniles in custody following pursuit, crash

Firefighters responded to the house in the first block of Anna Street around 8:30 a.m. and reported seeing heavy smoke from the structure. 

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The fire was contained to the second floor of the structure but did cause significant damage. 

Firefighters said the house is vacant and the fire is considered suspicious. 

No injuries were reported. 

UPDATE @ 9:10 a.m. 

Firefighters continue to work to extinguish a house fire that broke out in the first block of Anna Street in Dayton Wednesday. 

There have been no initial reports of injuries and it is unknown if the house is occupied. 

We’ll update this page as we learn more.

FIRST REPORT

Firefighters have responded to a reported house fire in the first block of Anna Street in Dayton Wednesday morning. 

Crews were dispatched around 8:30 a.m. and reported smoke coming from the second floor of the structure. 

We have a crew on the way and we’ll update this page as new details become available. 

JUST IN: Dayton Woman’s Club hires new chef, opens to public for lunch

Published: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 7:50 AM

Dayton Woman's Club hires new chef, expands lunch menu

The Dayton Woman’s Club has hired a new chef, revamped its restaurant’s menu, and expanded the restaurant’s hours to be open the public for lunch each weekday.

In recent months, the Dayton Woman’s Club’s restaurant had been open to the public only two days a week. But those hours have expanded to 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday, according to Heather Riley, the club’s general manager.

RELATED: 600 jobs coming to downtown Dayton; businesses get ready

The restaurant at 225 N. Ludlow St. in downtown Dayton is now under the direction of a new executive chef, Stephanie Schifrin Salas, a Cincinnati native who has more than two decades of experience, the last three years as executive chef at the University of Cincinnati. The Culinary Institute of America-trained chef also has worked for The Compass Group, Aramark, and Sodexo Corporate Services, and has served sports teams including the Chicago Bears and Cleveland Indians.

The Woman’s Club restaurant’s current lunch menu focuses mostly on soups and sandwiches, but will expand and will change with the seasons, Riley said.

RELATED: Did you know you can eat lunch at the Dayton Engineers Club, too?

The historic club is located at 225 N. Ludlow St. in downtown Dayton. It was founded in 1916 as an organization that would provide women in the Dayton area a center for social, civic and literary activities. The building was constructed in the late 1840’s as the private home of Robert W. Steele, for whom Dayton’s first high school was named.

The Dayton Woman’s Club remains a membership organization, with 110 current members, but its structure, which has been given Historical Landmark status, is open to the public for seminars, meetings, weddings and other events, Riley said.

The club’s restaurant will be open one Sunday a month for brunch, and may add dinner service on evenings when there is a show at the Schuster Center, Riley said.

PHOTOS: Inside the Dayton Engineer’s Club

A special dinner that will be co-hosted with another downtown club steeped in history — The Engineer’s Club — is scheduled for this Friday, Sept. 22, at the Dayton Woman’s Club. It is open to the public and will feature guest speaker Mitch Heaton, president of The Engineer’s Club and project manager at the Dayton Development Coalition. The cost is $25 for members, $28 for non-members Reservations for the special dinner are required and can be made by calling (937) 228-1124.

Reservations for lunch at the Dayton Woman’s Club are accepted but not required. For large parties, reservations are recommended. For more information, call (937) 228-1124.

Xenia Council votes 5-1 in favor of CSU pre-annexation deal

Published: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 10:19 AM

With one member dissenting, Xenia City Council approved a pre-annexation agreement with Central State University, one of the required components in the city's petition to bring the university into the city's corporate limits.

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The pre-annexation agreement spells out the first of three phases for the annexation to be implemented and what services the city will provide to the university. 

The city owns approximately 41 acres of the Ohio to Erie Trail, which is "contiguous" with about 4.5 acres of state land that is used by CSU, and that meets the requirements for a Type 2 annexation, according to the agreement. 

RELATED >>> Xenia City Council approves CSU annexation petition

A Type 2 annexation has been referred to as a balloon-on-a-string annexation, in which a municipality leverages a small strip of land to acquire a large tract of property.

Councilman Dale Louderback does not support the push to annex the university and voted "no" on the pre-annexation agreement. 

Louderback said the city stands to gain only $158,000 in added annual income tax revenue, and Xenia taxpayers will have to pay more on water bills to accommodate the loss in the 20 percent surcharge the university is currently paying for water and sewer services from the city. 

RELATED >>> Some oppose move to annex CSU campus into city

"People think I'm anti-CSU. I'm not anti-CSU. I represent the taxpayers of Xenia. I just don't think it's a good business decision," Louderback said. 

The pre-annexation agreement states that the city and the university "shall cooperate with each other in the proposed annexation," including signing and filing the appropriate petitions with the Greene County Board of Commissioners.

MORE >>> Business grants are up for grabs in Greene County 

The agreement states the city will provide a host of services to the university: fire protection and inspection; EMS and law enforcement services; engineering staff; parks and recreation programming; street maintenance; and water/sewer services. 

Council members also approved a memorandum of understanding regarding police services to the university. The memorandum states the university will continue to maintain its own police force and the city will provide mutual aid as requested.