AF Marathon numbers down from 2017 on first day of sign up

Published: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 @ 12:16 PM

            The 2015 Air Force Marathon begins. TY GREENLEES / STAFF FILE PHOTO
            Ty Greenlees
The 2015 Air Force Marathon begins. TY GREENLEES / STAFF FILE PHOTO(Ty Greenlees)

The number of runners who signed up on the first day to run the 2018 Air Force Marathon dropped compared to the first registration day in 2017, figures show.

Marathon statistics show 3,337 people signed up Jan. 2 compared to 5,015 on the first day to register in 2016, according to Marathon Director Rob Aguiar.

“In the running industry now, the first day of registration is not what is used to be say 10 years ago when you had less races and when you had to register quickly on that day to make sure you got in,” Aguiar said.

Runners are “more cautious” today than in the past, he said.

RELATED: Air Force Marathon chooses drone as ‘official’ aircraft of 2018 races

“They don’t want to commit right in the beginning if something happens,” he said. “… Folks are waiting, making sure they’re healthy, making sure their schedule permits.”

Air Force Marathon runners compete in 5K and 10K races and half- and full-marathons. The half-marathon led the pack at with 1,065 participants signed up as of Tuesday, Aguiar said. The 10K had 881 runners and the 5K counted 715, thus far.

Organizers created a new “premium” medal in 2018 for runners who complete the 5K, 10K and the half-marathon.

Despite the influx of runners last year on the first day of registration, the final number of participants reached 13,679 in 2017, the first time the race did not have at least 15,000 runners since 2012. Mirroring a trend from prior years, runners from all 50 states and 14 countries competed in the 2017 contest.

RELATED: Air Force Marathon participation down; race seeks answers

Competitors have more contests to choose: In 2012, 26,370 were counted in the United States versus 30,400 in 2016, according to Running USA.

This year’s marathon includes a 5K race at Wright State University on Sept. 14 and the 10K, half- and full-marathons starting and finishing at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Sept. 15.

For additional information or to register, log onto www.usafmarathon.com .

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Girl shot in Maryland school shooting taken off life support, dies

Published: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 11:30 AM

Girl Shot In Maryland High School Shooting Dies After Taken Off Life Support

One of two victims of a school shooting in Maryland has died. 

Jaelynn Rose Willey, 16, was taken off of life support Thursday. She died a few hours later at 11:34 p.m. Thursday night, WRC reported.

Willey was injured earlier this week when a student with whom she had a previous relationship shot her in the head in the hallway of Great Mills High School, WRC reported.

This undated photo provided by the Willey family shows Jaelynn Willey. A teenager armed with a handgun shot and critically wounded Willey inside a Maryland school on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, and the shooter was killed when a school resource officer confronted him moments after the gunfire erupted. A third student was in good condition after he was shot.(Courtesy of the Willey family via AP)

Officials with the St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office announced Willey’s death Friday morning, WBAL reported.

She was one of nine children in the Willey family. Family members said she helped take care of the other children every day, WRC reported.

The gunman died after he and a school resource officer exchanged gunfire; however, officials have not released if it was the officer’s shot that killed the teen gunman, or if he killed himself, WBAL reported.

Another student, Desmond Barnes, 14, was shot in the leg, WRC reported. He was released from a hospital Wednesday, WBAL reported.

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5 things to know about the continuing absence of Hamilton’s school superintendent

Published: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 12:15 PM

            Hamilton Schools Superintendent Tony Orr remains on paid leave - under order of the city’s school board - as questions continue as to why? The school board has reviewed an independent investigator’s report into allegations Orr violated board policies but members are not commenting.
Hamilton Schools Superintendent Tony Orr remains on paid leave - under order of the city’s school board - as questions continue as to why? The school board has reviewed an independent investigator’s report into allegations Orr violated board policies but members are not commenting.

The questions about why the leader of one of Ohio’s largest school systems was ordered on leave continue in Hamilton.

Since Feb. 5, Hamilton schools Superintendent Tony Orr has been absent by orders of the school board.

A long executive session on Thursday saw Hamilton Board of Education members emerge the same way they went into the private meeting – without comment.

MORE: School board meets in private session to discuss future of Hamilton school leader

Here are five things to know about this situation:

1. Neither side is talking. Outside of released statements from the board and Orr shortly after the superintendent’s paid leave was ordered, there has been no comments from either party. The board cited allegations Orr violated board policies.

2. The community is talking. Rumors as to why Orr was ordered on leave continue to swirl through the 10,000-student city schools and the city of more than 62,000 residents.

A handful of parents have consistently spoken at school board meetings since early February asking why Orr was told to leave.

School parent and Orr supporter Randy Romer has been among them, and he said “the rumors are exploding.”

3. The board said allegations do not involve students. This news outlet has checked repeatedly with Hamilton police to see if they are conducting any investigation involving Orr in any manner, and officials there said no.

In his only statement to date, Orr said he did not know the nature of the allegations against him and expressed confidence he will be exonerated and returned to his superintendent’s job.

4. It could end Monday. On Thursday the board reviewed an independent investigation report, joined by the school system’s attorney. Board members declined to comment Thursday regarding the investigation’s report, but they said the board plans to meet on Monday at 5 p.m. and again will go into private, executive session as allowed by Ohio law for boards discussing personnel matters.

5. Teachers union representatives wanted to be heard. Some members of the union representing teachers in Hamilton schools attended the special board meeting Thursday, where the board took some actions on unrelated motions before convening into executive session.

Debra Gann, president of the Hamilton Classroom Teachers Association, asked Isgro, “Do you have any idea when you might make a decision” on Orr’s job status?

Isgro replied, “We are going to have to probably study the (investigator’s) report and make a decision from there.”

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Who is John Bolton, H.R. McMaster’s replacement?

Published: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 8:44 AM

Who Is H.R. McMaster, Trump’s National Security Adviser

On Thursday, President Donald Trump named John Bolton as his new national security adviser.

Bolton, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, was tapped to replace H.R. McMaster. 

Bolton, 69, has a long history of work in Washington D.C., including leadership roles at the State and Justice departments and the U.S. Agency for International Development.

McMaster replaced Retired Army Gen. Michael Flynn after Flynn was fired 24 days into the Trump administration. Last, fall Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to investigators in special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe into possible collusion between Trump’s campaign and Russian officials during the 2016 presidential campaign.

>> Read more trending news 

Bolton will take over the job on April 9.

Here are a few things to know about Bolton:

  • Bolton, a strong supporter of American military might, served in the administrations of Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush.
  • He was one of President George W. Bush’s lawyers during the Florida vote recount in the 2000 presidential election.
  • From 1985–1989, he was the assistant attorney general at the Justice Department. 
  • From 1989–1993, he was the assistant secretary for International Organization Affairs at the State Department.
  • In May 2001, Bolton was named the under secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security.
  • Between 1999 and 2001, he served on the board of the Committee for International Religious Freedom. 
  • Bolton served as United States Ambassador to the United Nations under George W. Bush. However, Senate Democrats and some Republicans blocked his nomination in 2005. He became ambassador by recess appointment from Bush.
  • Bolton is considered a “super” hawk by some in Washington. According to a profile from Reuters, he kept a defused hand grenade on his desk during his time at the State Department.
  • He recently wrote a commentary piece in the Wall Street Journal titled, “The legal case for striking North Korea first.” 
  • He considered running for president in the 2012 election. 
  • In a December 2012 interview with Greta Van Susteren, he said Hillary Clinton faked a concussion so she would not have to testifying before Congress about the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya. 
  • Bolton was senior vice president for public policy research at the American Enterprise Institute. The AEI is a public policy research institute.
  • He has been a Fox News contributor.
  • He’s written several books including “Surrender is not an Option,” and “How Barack Obama is Endangering Our National Sovereignty.”
  • Donald Trump considered Bolton for his Secretary of State
  • He was interviewed for the job of national security adviser after Flynn was fired.

FILE - In this Feb. 24, 2017, file photo, former U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. John Bolton speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference(CPAC)

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Ex-Springfield schools ‘tech guy’ accused of inappropriately touching students

Published: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 11:05 AM

Students leave Springfield High School at the end of the school day. Bill Lackey/Staff
Staff Writer
Students leave Springfield High School at the end of the school day. Bill Lackey/Staff(Staff Writer)

A former Springfield City Schools technology employee is charged after multiple female students at the district accused him of inappropriately touching them, according to court documents.

Jordan Pennington, 33, is charged with gross sexual imposition, according to court documents.

One child victim “had reported that while she was in her classroom, the ‘Tech Guy’ who helps with laptops placed his hand on her back and lowered it to the top of her butt and that she moved before he could touch her entire butt,” court records showed.

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A second child reported Pennington touch the side of her breast over her clothes at the school and at the STEM Nights on “numerous occasions,” records indicated.

“Upon learning of the allegations, the District immediately placed the employee on paid administrative leave and conducted a formal investigation into these concerns,” Springfield City School said in a prepared statement.  “The employee in question is no longer employed with the Springfield City School District.”

The incidents were reported to have happened in January and February.

Records indicated that some of the incidents reported were witnessed and numerous children were interviewed as part of the investigation.

Pennington is not currently in the Clark County Jail.

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