Man allegedly stabs grandson after argument over a doughnut

Published: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 @ 2:24 PM

Jose Ortega
Raytown Police Department
Jose Ortega(Raytown Police Department)

Prosecutors charged a Missouri man with domestic assault and armed criminal action  Wednesday after he was accused of stabbing his 12-year-old grandson as they argued over a doughnut, WDAF reported.

>> Read more trending news

Paramedics took the boy to the hospital, police said. Authorities found a 10-inch blade with apparent blood on it in the driveway of the victim’s home, WDAF reported. 

According to court documents in Jackson County, Jose Ortega, 67, told investigators he “snapped” when he allegedly stabbed his grandson on Tuesday at a Raytown residence.

The charging document also says that Ortega grabbed the boy by the neck and threw him to the ground before stabbing him in the arm, WDAF reported.

Paramedics took the boy to the hospital, police said. Authorities found a 10-inch blade with apparent blood on it in the driveway of the victim’s home, WDAF reported. 

According to the charging document, Ortega told Detective Joshua Wildman that the victim was very disrespectful. He said the disrespect, the stress of his job, his depression, and not being seen by a psychiatrist caused him stress. Ortega told the detective that he and the boy “were arguing over” a doughnut, and his grandson “refused to give him one,” the document said.

The boy ran across the street just after 7 a.m. and asked neighbors for help, WDAF reported.

“All I could understand from him was him and his grandpa was joking around," Dana Payne told WDAF. "He was getting ready for school. Then his grandpa started calling him a liar, something about Google Maps, and he just reached for a butcher knife and stabbed him."

Payne brought the 12-year-old boy into her house and found him cradling his arm in a cloth. She said his forearm had been stabbed all the way through with a butcher knife.

When police interviewed Ortega, he said he did not want to kill his grandson, but wanted to hurt him, WDAF reported. He said he knew what he did was wrong and expressed remorse, police said.

Ortega told Wildman that he knew what he did was wrong and expressed remorse, according to the charging document. 

Man Charged After Stabbing Grandson Raytown, MO – Jose D. Ortega, a 67 year old Raytown man, has been charged with the...

Posted by Raytown Police Department on Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Trending - Most Read Stories

Lisa Marie Presley sues ex-manager contending he lost her $100 million fortune

Published: Saturday, February 24, 2018 @ 7:55 PM

Singer Lisa Marie Presley (L) and musician and estranged husband, Michael Lockwood, attend the premiere of Warner Bros. Pictures'
Singer Lisa Marie Presley (L) and musician and estranged husband, Michael Lockwood, attend the premiere of Warner Bros. Pictures' "Mad Max: Fury Road" at the TCL Chinese Theatre on May 7, 2015 in Hollywood, California. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Lisa Marie Presley is suing her former manager, Barry Siegel, for “reckless and negligent mismanagement” of her inherited estate, but her estranged husband was quick to call her so-called mountain of debt a lie.

>> Read more trending news 

Presley inherited $100 million from her rock ‘n’ roll father Elvis Presley back in 1993. Today, she said she only has $14,000 left, alleging that Siegel’s poor investment decisions whittled down her cash reserves. He sold off 85 percent of her share in the Elvis Presley Enterprises company in 2005, saying it “cleared up over $20 million in debts she had incurred and netted her over $40 million cash and a multi-million dollar income stream.”

Presley, however, said she lost millions in the deal. Siegel has counter sued, claiming she is to blame for squandering much of her own fortune, and he’s demanding $800,000 in damages for non-payment.

Presley is now $16 million in debt amid her ongoing divorce from estranged husband Michael Lockwood. That figure was revealed after a judge ordered her to pay $50,000 of Lockwood’s  $450,000 in attorney’s fees, which she claimed she could not afford. Lockwood, however, claimed Presley isn’t being truthful about her debt.

According to Lockwood, Presley claimed to be making $104,000 per month in 2016 and that she owed the IRS $1.67 million, which Lockwood says would mean she owes more than she made in income that year. Additionally, Presley did fudge the numbers when it comes to the English manor she owns, according to documents obtained by TMZ. While she has claimed to be way behind on mortgage payments for the property, Lockwood believes it’s still worth something and accused her of leaving that out of her calculations.

>> Related: Leah Remini’s attacks on Scientology put a strain on her friendship with Lisa Marie Presley

The pair married in 2006 and welcomed twin daughters two years later. In 2016, Presley filed for divorce citing irreconcilable differences and claiming Lockwood was a bad father who “took advantage” of her financially.

Trending - Most Read Stories

House releases Democrats’ rebuttal to GOP memo on alleged government surveillance abuses

Published: Saturday, February 24, 2018 @ 4:23 PM

 House Intelligence Ranking Member Adam Schiff (D-CA) speaks at the Council On Foreign Relations .
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
 House Intelligence Ranking Member Adam Schiff (D-CA) speaks at the Council On Foreign Relations .(Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

The House Intelligence Committee Saturday released the Democrats’ rebuttal to the Republican memo alleging the FBI and Department of Justice engaged in questionable tactics in the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and alleged Trump campaign collusion with Russia. 

>> Read more trending news 

Schiff Memo by National Content Desk on Scribd

>> Related: House Intelligence Committee votes to release Democrat’s rebuttal to Nunes memo

The 10-page memo, released two weeks after President Donald Trump blocked it and after wrangling between Democrats and DOJ officials, was authored by ranking Intelligence Committee Democrat Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) in response to one by House Intelligence Committee chairman Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA), and disputes allegations that illegal tactics were used to get warrants to surveil a former Trump campaign aide.

“The Democratic response memo released today should put to rest any concerns that the American people might have as to the conduct of the FBI, the Justice Department and the FISC. Our extensive review of the initial FISA application and three subsequent renewals failed to uncover any evidence of illegal, unethical, or unprofessional behavior by law enforcement and instead revealed that both the FBI and DOJ made extensive showings to justify all four requests,” Schiff said in a statement Saturday after the release of the memo.

Trump tweeted a response to Schiff’s document release Saturday, calling the Democrats’ memo “a total political and legal bust.” He also repeated his claims that special prosecutor Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and possible collusion with the Trump campaign is a “witch hunt.”

The president released the Nunes memo last month, which contained information purporting to show that the FBI and DOJ did not provide complete information when requesting a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court warrant to watch one-time Trump campaign member and foreign policy advisor Carter Page.

>> Related: Trump sends Democrats’ Nunes rebuttal memo back to House committee

The release of both memos came over the objections of investigators in the intelligence communities.

What You Need To Know About Carter Page

Trending - Most Read Stories

Delta latest company ending discounts, benefits for NRA members

Published: Saturday, February 24, 2018 @ 10:40 AM
Updated: Saturday, February 24, 2018 @ 11:24 AM

Delta Air Lines will be ending discounts for NRA members.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Delta Air Lines will be ending discounts for NRA members.(Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Atlanta-based Delta Air Lines announced Saturday it is ending a discount for National Rifle Association members.

>> Read more trending news

The move comes as some other businesses broke ties with the NRA amid debate over gun control in the wake of the Parkland school shooting in Florida earlier this month.

“We will be requesting that the NRA remove our information from its website,” Delta said in a written statement.

>> 3 car rental companies cancel discounts for NRA members 

The move comes as some other businesses break ties with the NRA amid debate over gun control in the wake of the Parkland school shooting in Florida earlier this month

Following is a list of some of the companies that have cut ties or distanced themselves from the NRA:

  • United Airlines -- United tweeted Saturday, "United is notifying the NRA that we will no longer offer a discounted rate to their annual meeting and we are asking that the NRA remove our information from their website." 

  • Delta Air Lines -- Delta issued the following statement Saturday: "Delta is reaching out to the National Rifle Association to let it know we will be ending its contract for discounted rates through our group travel program. We will be requesting that the NRA remove our information from its website." 

  • First National Bank of Omaha -- The bank announced that it would not renew a co-branded Visa credit-card with the NRA.

  • The Hertz Corp. -- The rental car company ended its discount program for NRA members.

  • MetLife Inc. -- The insurer terminated discounts that had been offered to NRA members on the NRA website

  • Enterprise Holdings Inc. -- The car rental company that also owns Alamo and National cut off discounts for NRA members.

  • Symantec Corp. -- The software company that makes Norton Antivirus technology ended its discount program with the NRA.

  • Chubb Ltd. -- The insurer announced it was ending participation in the NRA's gun-owner insurance program, though it provided notice three months ago.

  • Best Western -- The hotel chain told multiple social media users that it was no longer affiliated with the NRA, though it did not say when that decision was made.

  • Wyndham Hotels -- The hotel chain told social media users it is no longer affiliated with the NRA without specifying when that decision was made.

    The NRA has released the following statement:

    "The more than five million law-abiding members of the National Rifle Association have enjoyed discounts and cost-saving programs from many American corporations that have partnered with the NRA to expand member benefits.

    "Since the tragedy in Parkland, Florida, a number of companies have decided to sever their relationship with the NRA, in an effort to punish our members who are doctors, farmers, law enforcement officers, fire fighters, nurses, shop owners and school teachers that live in every American community. We are men and women who represent every American ethnic group, every one of the world’s religions and every form of political commitment.

    "The law-abiding members of the NRA had nothing at all to do with the failure of that school’s security preparedness, the failure of America’s mental health system, the failure of the National Instant Check System or the cruel failures of both federal and local law enforcement.

    "Despite that, some corporations have decided to punish NRA membership in a shameful display of political and civic cowardice. In time, these brands will be replaced by others who recognize that patriotism and determined commitment to Constitutional freedoms are characteristics of a marketplace they very much want to serve.

    "Let it be absolutely clear. The loss of a discount will neither scare nor distract one single NRA member from our mission to stand and defend the individual freedoms that have always made America the greatest nation in the world."

    Trending - Most Read Stories

    FDA approves blood test that can detect concussions 

    Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 10:58 PM

    Maxime Chanot #4 of New York City FC holds his head after a clash of heads form a corner kick during the New York City FC Vs San Jose Earthquakes regular season MLS game at Yankee Stadium on April 1, 2017 in New York City. 
Tim Clayton - Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images
    Maxime Chanot #4 of New York City FC holds his head after a clash of heads form a corner kick during the New York City FC Vs San Jose Earthquakes regular season MLS game at Yankee Stadium on April 1, 2017 in New York City. (Tim Clayton - Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images)

    The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved a breakthrough blood test that can help detect concussions in adults.

    >> Read more trending news 

    The blood test, also known as the Banyan Brain Trauma Indicator Test, works by measuring UCH-L1 and GFAP, both proteins released from the brain into the blood, within 12 hours of a head injury.

    It can be administered as soon as 15 minutes after the injury, but results take a few hours to produce.

    >> Related: When love isn’t enough: A daughter’s suicide leaves a grieving father searching for answers

    According to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, traumatic brain injury is a “serious public health problem in the United States.” In 2013 alone, there were about 2.8 million visits to emergency rooms for traumatic brain injury-related conditions. Of these, nearly 50,000 people died.

    TBI is typically caused by a blow or bump to the head, or a by a head injury that disrupts the brain’s normal functioning. It can range from mild to severe. About 75 percent of TBIs that occur each year are assessed as mild TBIs or concussions. 

    >> Related: Spit test could diagnose concussion in kids, study says

    Most patients with traumatic brain injury undergo a neurological exam, followed by a CT scan.

    For their research, the FDA evaluated data on 1,947 individual blood samples from adults with suspected mild TBI or concussion and reviewed the product’s performance by comparing blood test results with CT scan results.

    They found the blood test was 97.5 percent as effective in detecting concussion and 99.6 perfect as effective in ruling out the injury.

    The test also costs as little as one-tenth as much as a CT scan.

    » RELATED: Which high school sports have the most concussions? 

    "A blood test that accurately, reliably and consistently detects the presence of brain proteins that appear in the blood after a brain injury is a major advance," Dr. David Dodick, a fellow of the American Academy of Neurology who specializes in sports medicine and neurology, told CNN. Dodick was not involved in the study.

    One of the challenges of diagnosing concussions is that the injury’s symptoms can occur at various times. For some, they appear instantly. Others may not experience symptoms for hours or even days.

    » RELATED: Football players under 12 at high risk of brain injury, study finds

    Symptoms also vary from person to person. Some may experience light or noise sensitivity, or may lose balance.

    “This is something that has been a long time coming,” Col. Dallas Hack, who was director of the Army’s Combat Casualty Care Research Program from 2008 to 2014 and is now retired, told the New York Times. 

    “The concept originally was that we would have something that medical personnel in the field would be able to use to assess whether somebody who had received a head injury needed a higher level of care,” Hack said.

    » RELATED: Youth football called ‘child abuse’

    But Dodick told CNN that researchers still need to better understand when brains have fully healed from trauma and how the protein biomarkers may actually affect prognosis. Additionally, it’s unclear whether or not the new test can determine subconcussive blows, hits to the head that don’t always cause symptoms but do cause brain injury. 

    Subconcussive or repeat blows are believed to lead to the neurodegenerative disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. Over time, that damage may lead to personality changes, mood disorders and other behavioral issues.

    "These occur much more often than actual concussions, especially in certain collision and contact sports,” Dodick told CNN.

    Trending - Most Read Stories