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Yankees interview Wedge, former Indians, Mariners manager

Published: Friday, November 10, 2017 @ 1:00 PM
Updated: Friday, November 10, 2017 @ 12:59 PM


            FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2013, file photo, then-Seattle Mariners manager Eric Wedge smiles before a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals, in Seattle. Former Cleveland and Seattle manager Eric Wedge has become the second person to interview with the New York Yankees for their dugout opening. He follows Yankees bench coach Rob Thomson, who interviewed Wednesday, Nov. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2013, file photo, then-Seattle Mariners manager Eric Wedge smiles before a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals, in Seattle. Former Cleveland and Seattle manager Eric Wedge has become the second person to interview with the New York Yankees for their dugout opening. He follows Yankees bench coach Rob Thomson, who interviewed Wednesday, Nov. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

Eric Wedge promises a touchy-feely approach if hired as New York Yankees manager, rejecting the old-school method of publicly challenging players to motivate them.

"If something like that happens today, especially with social media and everything else that's involved with it, it's going to have legs, it's going to be misinterpreted, there's going to be a lot more opinion about it and it's going to be one hell of the distraction," the former Cleveland and Seattle manager said Friday after his interview with the Yankees. "I'd say that that day has probably passed by."

Joe Girardi criticized Gary Sanchez last August and benched him for a game, saying: "Bottom line, he needs to improve. He's late getting down." Sanchez tied for the big league lead with 16 passed balls and was behind the plate for 53 wild pitches, second-most in the majors.

Wedge spoke of a generic player receiving a rebuke from his manager through the media.

"You're going to have to have one tough cookie to be able to do that and make it work for you," he said. "For him to get something out of that, he's going to have to be really tough to be able to handle that and actually digest it to see it's in his best interest."

After a decade managing the Yankees, Girardi was told last month that he was not being offered a contract. Wedge became the second person to interview for the job following New York bench coach Rob Thomson on Wednesday.

Sanchez, who turns 25 next month, was an All-Star in his first full big league season.

"He's still young. He's still learning. He's still going through things that he needs to go through and he will continue to go through, but he'll get better," said Wedge, a former catcher. "It's just a maturation process that young players with his type of ability have to go through."

Now 49, Wedge was a "cup of coffee" player in the majors, getting 86 at-bats over four seasons with Boston (1991-92, 1995) and Colorado (1994) and making 23 appearances behind the plate.

"I believe you can have a personal relationship with your players as well as a professional relationship," he said. "It takes a little bit more time. It takes a little bit more effort. But I think that it's something that's imperative, something I've always done, something I'll continue to do. And as long as they understand where you're coming from, that you care about them, and you care about them for the right reasons, which quite frankly is for them and their family, then when it is time to turn that page to a more professional conversation of maybe an even more edgy conversation, we'll be in a good position to do that."

Wedge managed in Cleveland's minor league system in 1998 and was promoted to big league manager before the 2003 season. He was voted AL Manager in the Year in 2007, when the Indians won the AL Central, beat the Yankees in the Division Series — the one with the Joba Chamberlain midge game — and lost to Boston in a seven-game Championship Series after holding a 3-1 lead. He was fired in 2009 after seven seasons with a 561-573 record.

Wedge was hired as Seattle's manager before the 2011 season. The Mariners went 213-273 over three seasons. He missed 28 games following a stroke, which he believes may have been caused by sleep apnea, then at the end of the season turned down a one-year contract. His overall big league managing record is 774-846.

After working as an ESPN analyst in 2014 and 2015, Wedge spent the last two seasons as a player development adviser with Toronto.

"I'm humble and resilient," he said. "I think that you've got to have to have a certain level of toughness to be a big league manager and handle everything that goes along with that."

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More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball

Escaped inmate found 3 miles from hospital

Published: Thursday, November 23, 2017 @ 1:32 AM
Updated: Thursday, November 23, 2017 @ 2:14 PM

Inmate escapes while being treated at Middletown hospital

UPDATE @ 2:11 p.m. (Nov. 23)

Robert Langford was apprehended in the area of Industrial Drive and Shaker Road, about three miles north of Atrium Medical Center. He’s in Warren County Jail now on a count of escape.

Robert Langford, Warren County Jail

UPDATE @ 10:19 a.m. (Nov. 23)

Robert Langford never made it into Atrium Medical Center Wednesday night before escaping corrections custody, a hospital spokeswoman reports. 

Langford was never a patient at Atrium and had never made it inside the hospital before escaping custody, according to the hospital. 

Warren County sheriff’s Sgt. Roy McGill said Langford is still on the loose and being sought by police.

This newsroom is working to confirm how and when Langford escaped custody.

Langford is an inmate at  the Community Corrections Center, which is across the street from the Lebanon Correctional Institute on Ohio 63. That is a different facility from the Warren County Jail in downtown Lebanon.

FIRST REPORT (Nov. 22)

Deputies from the Warren County Sheriff’s Office are looking for an inmate that escaped custody of the Community Corrections Center staff late Wednesday night. 

TRENDING: Dayton Public Schools Supt. put on administrative leave

Robert Langford escaped custody of the CCC staff while in the process of being treated at Atrium Medical Center. He was last seen running north from the Atrium Medical Center in the city of Middletown at 8:08 p.m. in a hospital gown.

TRENDING: Deputy pursues car suspected in cell phone store heists

Langford is described as a 31-year-old white male, 6 feet tall, weighing 175 pounds with blue eyes and blond hair. 

He was sentenced to the Community Corrections Center after being convicted of drug offenses.

Anyone with information as to the whereabouts of Robert Langford are urged to contact the Warren County Sheriff’s Office at 513-695-1280 or the Warren County Communications Center at 513-695-2525. 

Reunions, friendships, gratitude highlight 49th annual Feast of Giving

Published: Thursday, November 23, 2017 @ 2:09 PM

Feast of Giving held in Dayton

Every year for the past several, Marquita R. Robinson sits at a table at the Feast of Giving inside a massive room at the Dayton Convention Center to have Thanksgiving dinner with several thousand of her neighbors.

It’s also a homecoming of sorts.

“This is the place where a lot of my friends (meet) to see each other and we haven’t seen each other throughout the whole year,” the 32-year-old Dayton resident said before standing up and shouting and waving at a friend.

More than 8,000 people were expected to stream through the convention center’s doors Thursday. Marking it’s 49th year, the Thanksgiving Day tradition draws people of all ages and backgrounds who come together one day as a community, many interacting with strangers they have never met.

Richard C. Jones, 50, of Dayton, stopped in for his first trip to Feast of Giving since moving to the Gem City from Atlanta.

“I didn’t have any plans and I’m relatively new to Dayton,” he said.

Last year, he said he spent Thanksgiving alone. That changed this time once he found out about the dinner.

“I’m hoping to meet some of my Dayton neighbors,” he said as a band played on a stage near his table. “I’m not really an outgoing person. This is like something brand new and hopefully becomes a tradition.”

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The gathering had 500 volunteers — and turned away another 700 — to prepare and serve free meals to throngs of attendees, said Stephen Levitt, one of the event’s organizers.

“There’s always a few hang-ups, but we make it work,” he said.

Stephanie Richardson, 53, of Dayton, and Amy Schmitt, 59, of Beavercreek, set out place mats and prepared decorations in a room set aside for children.

The Thanksgiving spirit of giving “just spoke to me,” said Richardson, volunteering for the first time at the dinner since she recently moved to Dayton from the Virgin Islands.

Schmitt, a self-described “people person” and a public health nurse, wanted to work with children.

“It’s fun,” she said. And it gave her a sense of appreciation. “You come in here and serve today and you walk out with no complaints.”

Carol and Roger Ober of Beavercreek, volunteered for the first time, working as security monitors.

Carol Ober, a 71-year-old retired school teacher, said they wanted “to be part of something bigger than yourself and this is definitely big.”

The community dinner is so big it takes days to cook food for thousands.

Thursday started with a very basic ingredient that was the hardest to manage: Boiling water, said Sous-Chief Andrew Payne.

“Probably close to 1,000 gallons of water we had to get to a boil to be able to make the stuffing, to make the gravy, to make the mashed potatoes,” he said. “It’s constant. We started boiling water at two o’clock this morning.”

Payne also was one of about a dozen who spent seven to 10 hours Monday slicing 3,000 pounds of turkey.

The shopping list this year included 2,600 pounds of mashed potatoes, 2,000 pounds each of green beans and breaded stuffing, and 100 gallons of gravy. For dessert, the feast rolled out 900 pies of all sorts and 8,000 servings of ice cream.

Vanilla is the most popular flavor, said Joe Hartenstein, 62, of Trotwood. The long-time event volunteer and retired school truant officer also hands out chocolate and sherbet ice cream.

RELATED: Thousands enjoy friends, good food at Feast of Giving

For Robinson, a restaurant cashier, the mashed potatoes are the best on a filled Thanksgiving plate.

“I always get double mash every time I come down here,” she said. “Because it’s all silky. You add some butter to them and they’re awesome.”

Organizers stepped in nearly a decade ago when the Beerman Foundation, which had sponsored the event since 1969, announced plans to end the Thanksgiving tradition in Dayton.

The event costs about $180,000, half of which represent purveyors who donate food and equipment and the rest represents monetary donations, Levitt said.

Booz Allen Hamilton lands $14.7M AFRL deal for combat simulation

Published: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 @ 9:57 AM
Updated: Thursday, November 23, 2017 @ 1:53 PM


            Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. TY GREENLEES / STAFF FILE PHOTO
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. TY GREENLEES / STAFF FILE PHOTO

A defense contractor has landed a $14.7 million deal to develop virtual combat modeling and simulation technologies, according to the Department of Defense.

The Air Force Research Laboratory awarded the five-year deal to McLean, Va.-based Booz Allen Hamilton, the Defense Department said. Three bidders were in contention for the contract.

RELATED: Wright Patt, defense firm work to protect weapons from cyber attack

The research will be conducted at both Wright-Patterson labs and in McLean, Va., the Defense Department said. AFRL has a worldwide workforce of more than 10,000 employees and is headquartered at Wright-Patterson.

Restaurant owner frustrated after burglar targets Broadway Cafe for 6th time

Published: Thursday, November 23, 2017 @ 1:02 PM

Broadway Cafe Owners says he’s been targeted six times for break-ins

A thief smashed a front window and took cash from a Trotwood restaurant, the sixth time the restaurant has been targeted, according to the owner. 

RELATED: Video captures armed robbery, shooting at Broadway Cafe in Trotwood

Around 7 a.m. Thursday, police responded to an alarm from the Broadway Cafe at 203 North Broadway Avenue in Trotwood and found one of the front windows smashed in. Video surveillance provided to this news outlet by the owner of the restaurant Antonio Celik shows throw a large rock four times at a plexiglass door before crawling inside. 

RELATED: Man takes cash during armed robbery at Trotwood restaurant

The suspect grabs a cash register before fleeing the area on foot. 

TRENDING: Dayton man stabbed after argument over what day Thanksgiving is

Celik said the suspect took a minimal amount of cash, but the damage will cost him hundreds of dollars. 

“Trotwood needs to know, this is not going to be easy, it’s not easy. This man, mask and gloves comes here, takes money, that’s not fair, that’s not fair.  I’m angry, really angry, 6 times, maybe 7 times,” Celik told News Center 7’s Mike Campbell. 

Broadway Cafe has been targeted several times, including in 2016 when Celik was shot after confronting robbers. 

Trotwood police encourage anyone with information to contact them or Crime Stoppers at 937-222-7867.