What you need to know if caught in severe weather away from home

Published: Friday, February 24, 2017 @ 2:05 PM

A series of showers and storms that could become severe are expected hit the Miami Valley region tonight, and News Center 7 meteorologists are advising people to stay weather aware. 

The biggest threat will be damaging winds and hail. The possibility of a tornado cannot be ruled out, said News Center 7 Meteorologist Carrieann Marit .

Marit warns people should not get so distracted by their surroundings that they lose sight of the weather scenario.

RELATED: Photos and video from today’s storms

“It’s always important to know what the plan is for storm safety wherever you are,” Marit said. “Many people know where their safe place is at home, but its easily overlooked while out in a public facilities.”

 Marit noted the tornado that hit the Greene in Beavercreek a few years ago is a prime example of how important it is to be prepared.

RELATED: Get the latest weather updates and alerts by downloading our free local weather apps.

The National Weather Service suggests that if you’re out, to stay way from windows if damaging winds or large hail are approaching. Also, do not go to large open rooms such as cafeterias, gymnasiums or auditoriums. 

If you’re outside, NWS suggests to go inside a sturdy building if severe thunderstorms are approaching. The agency notes sheds and storage facilities are not safe, and taking shelter under a tree can be deadly. The tree could fall on you. Standing under a tree can increase your risk of getting struck by lightning. 

If you’re in a vehicle, you’re safer than being outside, according to NWS. However, the agency suggests you drive to the closest secure shelter if you have enough time.

No place outside is safe when thunderstorms are in the area, according to the NWS website. If you can hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike you. 

When you hear thunder, you should immediately move to safe shelter such as a large building with electricity or plumbing or an enclosed, metal-topped vehicle with windows up. 

Stay in safe shelter at least 30 minutes after you hear the last sound of thunder.

If you’re indoors, avoid lying on concrete floors, and do not lean against concrete walls.

Get the latest weather updates and alerts by downloading our free local weather apps.

OHP: 2-vehicle accident on I-75 N in Shelby County briefly shuts interstate

Published: Thursday, September 21, 2017 @ 9:51 PM
Updated: Friday, September 22, 2017 @ 12:01 AM

Crash in Shelby Co.
Crash in Shelby Co.

A vehicle accident believed to involve a car and a semitrailer has shut down I-75 North and South from Anna to Botkins in Shelby County. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: 1 injured in rollover on interstate in Clark County

We're told by the Ohio Highway Patrol Post at Wapakoneta that the interstate has been shut down to accommodate CareFlight for the injured. 

We're told the injuries -- it’s unclear how many people have been injured -- are believed to be non-life threatening. 

According to Shelby County sheriff's dispatch, the accident was reported just after 8:30 p.m. 

We will update this developing report. Stay with whio.com for breaking news. 

GOT A TIP? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

McCall Vrydaghs: Official start to fall is this afternoon

Published: Monday, September 18, 2017 @ 10:44 AM

The northern and southern hemispheres both receive nearly the same amount of sunlight during the equinoxes — the first day of fall and spring. The first day of fall is Friday. NASA
The northern and southern hemispheres both receive nearly the same amount of sunlight during the equinoxes — the first day of fall and spring. The first day of fall is Friday. NASA

It’s hard to believe, but summer will come to an end today.

The first official day of fall begins at 4:02 p.m. This is exact moment when the sun’s path crosses directly over the equator.

The changing of the seasons is due to the tilt of the earth, at 23½ degrees, and its orbit around the sun. During the summer, the northern hemisphere is titled towards the sun, allowing for a higher sun angle and longer days. This helps to warm areas above the equator.

RELATED: Touchdown 7 Forecast

The opposite happens during the winter. It’s during the equinoxes, first day of fall and spring, that the northern and southern hemispheres both receive nearly the same amount of sunlight.

Moving forward into autumn, shorter days and longer nights will bring about a big change in temperatures.

Typical highs in the Miami Valley on the first day of fall should reach the lower 70s. In one months’ time that average daytime high will fall into the lower 60s.

RELATED: Jupiter visible in the night sky through Saturday

This decline in temperatures will continue well past the first day of winter (Dec. 21) until we reach our coldest temperatures in mid-January. By then the average daytime high is around the middle 30s.

Although cooler, the fall comes with some beauty.

It’s the seasonal switch that actually triggers leaves to start changing colors. During this time, chlorophyll, which is dominant in summer giving leaves their green tones, starts to break down and new colors are reveled. One of the interesting facts is that the vibrant colors revealed this time of year are actually the true colors of the leaves.

The vibrancy and duration of fall foliage is influenced by temperatures, sunlight and rainfall. For the brightest colors sunny conditions are needed as well as seasonal rainfall totals with cool, but above freezing nights.

McCall Vrydaghs is a WHIO StormCenter 7 meteorologist. Contact her at mccall.vrydaghs@coxinc.com or follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

WHIO StormCenter 7 Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell will return next week.

Montgomery Co. Fair: Machinery, horse gates, nostalgic items up for auction 

Published: Thursday, September 21, 2017 @ 11:00 PM

The open class exhibit inside the Roundhouse shown July 7, 2017, for the last Montgomery County Fair to be held at the original fairgrounds on South Main Street in Dayton. The final fair opened July 10.
TY GREENLEES / STAFF
The open class exhibit inside the Roundhouse shown July 7, 2017, for the last Montgomery County Fair to be held at the original fairgrounds on South Main Street in Dayton. The final fair opened July 10.(TY GREENLEES / STAFF)

The Montgomery County Fair auction set for Tuesday features “hundreds of things from A to Z.”

The Montgomery County Agriculture Society Board of Directors announced the auction ahead of the fair’s move to its new fairgrounds and event center at Arthur O. Fisher Park in Jefferson Twp. from the Main Street fairgrounds in Dayton.

Plans unveiled for the new Montgomery County Fairgrounds site in Jefferson Twp. call for three air-conditioned and heated buildings to keep and attract year-round events. Seven buildings and an office are planned during the first phase of development.(MONTGOMERY COUNTY AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY)

RELATED: Miami County Fair officials to break ground at new location

“It is bittersweet, and this location has served Dayton and the Miami Valley well, but now we look forward to a promising future with an all new, state-of-the-art facility,” board President John Yancik said.

“We are auctioning off hundreds of things from A to Z, sentimental and functioning items,” he said.

RELATED: Final day of last Montgomery County Fair downtown ends with a ‘smash’

The liquidation sale features a Case tractor, forklift, Kubota mowers, pickup trucks, safe, chairs, horse gates, nostalgic items and more. A complete list is on the fair board website.

Serious bidders can view auction items from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday. The auction is at noon Tuesday at the Dayton Montgomery County Fairgrounds site, 1043 S. Main St.

Riverside votes to sell land for marijuana farm near Air Force museum

Published: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 @ 1:42 PM
Updated: Thursday, September 21, 2017 @ 10:30 PM

Marijuana plants sit in a grow house and marijuana dispensary in Quincy, Mass., March 29, 2017. (Adam Glanzman/The New York Times)
Marijuana plants sit in a grow house and marijuana dispensary in Quincy, Mass., March 29, 2017. (Adam Glanzman/The New York Times)

UPDATE @ 10:30 p.m.

City Council voted 4-2 tonight to sell three acress of land next to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base to Farms of Riverside LLC, pending they win a state license to cultivate medical marijuana.

Before the vote, the council members discussed their reasons for backing or opposing the issue.

“The community out there is not at all interested of having the reputation of having medical marijuana grown across from the museum,” Councilwoman Sara Lommatzsch said.

Riverside City Council votes 4-2 Sept. 21, 2017, to approve the sell of land to Farms of Riverside LLC, pending a state license to cultivate marijuana on the property near the National Museum of the United States Air Force on the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.(JAMES BUECHELE / STAFF)

“I think we have to grab this and just hope that we get the license,” Councilman Steven Fullenkamp said.

Mayor William Flaute said the council has been considering the issue for a long time. He said that while he has struggled reaching a decision, he now supports it.

“I’ve talked to numerous citizens about this,” he said. “The reason that really got me is 88 percent of people in the United States of America believe medical marijuana is a positive thing, so how can that be a negative for our community?

MORE: Bike path could impede Riverside’s medical marijuana plans

“I don’t believe that it’s going to hurt the reputation of our city and it will only be a good thing for us,” Flaute said.

After the vote some residents left immediately, apparently in disgust of the vote’s outcome.

Mike Horn of Farms of Riverside said his company looks forward to working on building he $3 million structure and bringing jobs to the community.

“We think it’s a very positive step for the region and also the community of Riverside,” he said.

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EARLIER REPORT

The city of Riverside will vote tonight on whether to sell three acres of land at the Center of Flight, near the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, to the Farms of Riverside, LLC, according to Councilman Steve Fullenkamp.

The parties are negotiating a site that will ensure the cultivation facility is not within 500 feet of the Mad River Trail, said Riverside law director Dalma Grandjean said earlier this month.

The sale would be contingent upon the Farms of Riverside obtaining a license to cultivate medical marijuana from the state. The state is aiming to have applications for cultivators approved and reviewed by early November.

MORE: Riverside council tables medical marijuana land sale vote

Earlier this month, the Dayton Daily News reported the proposed medical marijuana cultivation facility could be too close to Mad River Trail bike path, complicating the bid to land the business in the city.

Applicants for medical marijuana businesses in Ohio must demonstrate that the business will not be located within 500 feet of a school, church, public library, public playground or public park.

Five Rivers MetroParks manages the Mad River Trail. Under the MetroPark’s bylaws, a park is defined as, “Any land or water area owned, leased, managed, or otherwise controlled by Five Rivers MetroParks.”

The meeting is 7 p.m. at Riverside’s city offices, 5200 Springfield Street, Suite 100.