Uber increases fees in Dayton 

Published: Friday, April 14, 2017 @ 11:06 AM

(Photo Illustration by David Ramos/Getty Images)
(Photo Illustration by David Ramos/Getty Images)

Taking an Uber from point A to point B now costs you more in Dayton. 

The popular ridesharing service is alerting customers of a booking fee increase. 

The booking rate increased from $1.85 to $2.20 a few weeks ago. 

>> Here’s what you need to know about Dayton's Uber service

“As a reminder, the booking fee is always included in the fare you see before you request,” reads an Uber message to its users. “Booking fees support rider and driver safety initiatives, as well as other operational costs.”  

This news organization has reached out to Uber seeking additional information. 

Uber Technologies, a vehicle-for-hire company, launched its app service in Dayton on on  August 28, 2014.

Lyft, an Uber competitor, launched on December 1. 

>> Lyft ride-sharing service launching in Dayton

On a national level, Uber has found itself embroiled in controversy in recent months. 

>> Uber sexism under investigation after female engineer’s ‘slightly horrifying’ story

>> Uber used secret program to track Lyft drivers

Dayton rally speaker to bring message of hope over dope

Published: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 @ 3:55 PM

Recovering heroin user Tim Ryan of Naperville, Ill., is one of the featured speakers at the Families of Addicts Rally 4 Recovery from 3-6 p.m. Sunday at Courthouse Square in Dayton. Ryan, who once made six figures and owned executive search firms, is the author of “From Dope to Hope.” Ryan also lost his 20-year-old son Nick to a drug overdose. SUBMITTED
Recovering heroin user Tim Ryan of Naperville, Ill., is one of the featured speakers at the Families of Addicts Rally 4 Recovery from 3-6 p.m. Sunday at Courthouse Square in Dayton. Ryan, who once made six figures and owned executive search firms, is the author of “From Dope to Hope.” Ryan also lost his 20-year-old son Nick to a drug overdose. SUBMITTED

The region may be in the darkest days yet of a protracted opioid crisis, but a rally Sunday aims to lift those struggling with drugs through community support, education and examples of others who have successfully broken heroin’s grip.

RELATED: Overdose crisis: Montgomery County is the national example for filmmakers and media

“If I can turn my life around, anyone can,” said Tim Ryan, who’s stuck to a treatment program following jail time after he overdosed driving and put four people in the hospital.

Ryan, of Naperville, Ill., is one of the featured speakers at the Families of Addicts Rally 4 Recovery from 3-6 p.m. at Courthouse Square in Dayton. Organizers expect the event to attract up to 5,000 people.

Just as hope was returning to Ryan’s life, his son Nick overdosed and died from an opioid habit the son had learned from the father.

Ryan first tried heroin in 2001 when it was offered by an acquaintance.

“I thought ‘What’s one bag going to do?,’” he said. “That one bag absolutely destroyed my life, and my family’s and everybody else near and dear to me.”

RELATED: County surpasses 2016 fatal overdose total before June

Ryan, who once made six figures and owned executive search firms, is the author of “From Dope to Hope.” He is currently national outreach director for Transformations Drug and Alcohol Treatment Center and runs A Man in Recovery Foundation.

“My main message is there’s hope out there. I don’t care what situation you’re in,” he said. “If you put your hand up, we’ll find you the opportunity to get on the road to recovery.”

Hundreds of people gathered at Courthouse Square in downtown Dayton on August 28, 2016, for the Third Annual Families of Addicts Rally 4 Recovery.(Staff Writer)

A signature highlight of past rallies is “The Big Picture,” a group photo that illustrates the number of people in the community touched by opioids, whether as a person in recovery or a supporting family member or friend. Following the photo, 2,600 white, red, yellow and green balloons will be let go to signify journies of recovery.

RELATED: Vast victims: Heroin damages the very young, old and even non-users

Mahajan Therapeutics is a co-sponsor of the rally, adding a mental health presence to the event.

Other rally highlights will include music by Rising Life Band, whose single My Sunny Day is popular on Christian Radio charts, as well as a raffle and food trucks.

A Rally 4 Recovery 5K walk/run will start at 6:15 p.m., hosted by the Drug Enforcement Agency’s “360 Degree Strategy” with proceeds benefitting FOA Families of Addicts and the Montgomery Drug Free Coalition. Call Dave Ashley at 937-823-9198 for more information about the 5K.

RELATED: Program launched by feds to battle local opioid epidemic

Details about meetings, the rally and updates on the organization can be found at facebook.com/FOAfamilies or FOAfamilies.org.

Free parking and shuttle service will be available between 2:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Parking is available at Sinclair Community College lots B, E or K, shuttle will pick up and drop off at each lot continuously throughout the event. A 5K shuttle bus will run until 8:30 p.m.

Internet hoaxers claim Limp Bizkit could ‘return’ for Sunoco solar eclipse party in Dayton

Published: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 @ 11:11 AM

The Limp Bizkit show at Sunoco was epic. Sad you missed it. Video by Amelia Robinson.

The solar eclipse has come and gone, which means all the excitement surrounding it can die down, right? Wrong. As the sky began to return to normal, in those waning moments, people were already talking about the next visible solar eclipse for North America.

>> PHOTOS: Solar eclipse in the Miami Valley

April 8, 2024 is the date for the next such eclipse, and it just so happens that Dayton will be a major hot spot, as the area will be treated to a totally obscured sun that day.

>> Facebook event claims Limp Bizkit coming to Wayne Ave.

>> Crowds show up at Limp Bizkit concert site

This has local hoaxsters already making Internet plans for a major party.


Posted by Irish I Was Laughing Comedy on Monday, August 21, 2017

>> Dayton police, Limp Bizkit tweet statements about Limp Bizkit at Sunoco

>> The best responses to Dayton’s Limp Bizkit concert hoax

An event page recently popped up on Facebook for an “eclipse party” at Dayton’s most famous gas station, the Sunoco at 912 Wayne Ave. (We put it in air quotes because the Wayne Ave. Sunoco has endured several fake events, and this is very obviously another, because people literally do not have parties at gas stations.)

>> See our favorite Instagram pics of the solar eclipse in Dayton

The page promises food, alcohol and live music -- albeit unconfirmed -- from Insane Clown PosseNaughty By NatureNew Kids on the BlockGreat White and, of course, Limp Bizkit -- “returning” stars of the April 20, 2016 and 2017 shows that TOTALLY happened. (Spoiler: Those events did NOT actually hapen.)

A very obvious hint as to the fact that this is a hoax: on the Facebook event, the venue is listed as “unconfirmed.”

Though the page has been up less than a day, it has more than 400 people committed to attending the (fake) show, with another thousand interested.  

Is anyone in the Belmont area missing their iguana?

Published: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 @ 12:08 PM

An iguana has been found in the Belmont neighborhood in Dayton. PHOTO / Dayton Ohio and surrounding areas lost and found pets Facebook page
An iguana has been found in the Belmont neighborhood in Dayton. PHOTO / Dayton Ohio and surrounding areas lost and found pets Facebook page

Really, we have just one question: how

Admittedly, we don’t know a whole lot about iguanas. Are they Houdini-esque escape artists? 

>> Internet hoaxers claim Limp Bizkit could ‘return’ for Sunoco solar eclipse party in Dayton

According to a Reddit post, someone found an iguana in the Belmont area . A photo post has since been made on the Dayton Ohio and surrounding area lost and found pets Facebook page.

>> See our favorite Instagrams of the solar eclipse in Dayton

If this is your iguana, visit the public Facebook post to claim. We hope to see this pet reunited with its owner soon!

Eye damage from eclipse can show later: What you need to know

Published: Monday, August 21, 2017 @ 3:13 PM
Updated: Monday, August 21, 2017 @ 3:32 PM

Take a look of a timelapse of the eclipse taken in the Miami Valley.

If you damaged your eyes during the eclipse it might take a while before you see symptoms.

The first full solar eclipse in 99 years happened this afternoon, and residents across the Dayton region came out to watch the event.

Those who didn’t use certified eclipse viewing glasses or alternative methods like a pinhole projector risked injuring their eyes and possible permanent damage.

RELATED: Multiple schools close because of eclipse

But it might take a while for that damage to show. Dr. Brian Pennington, emergency room physician with Sycamore Medical Center said he hadn’t seen any patients yet with injuries related to the eclipse as of Monday afternoon, but the symptoms tend to be delayed with showing.

LOCAL NEWS: Judge shot, wounded outside Ohio courthouse

“It does take about anywhere from eight to 12 hours after the initial exposure to really develop the symptoms,” he said.

RELATED: What not to do the day of and during the total solar eclipse

He said with the sun partially obscured, people can stand looking at the sun for longer, which can lead to someone staring at the sun long enough to cause temporary or permanent damage. Some symptoms could be feeling like there is a foreign object in your eye, redness, dryness, pain or even loss of vision.

A spokeswoman with Miami Valley Hospital said the only person the Premier-affiliated hospital’s ER saw related to the eclipse was someone who had fallen during the event. She said it can take up to 24 hours to see the affects of staring up at the eclipse.

Prior to the eclipse, local doctors warned that residents should proceed with caution and use proper eye protection when looking up at the sun durin the event.

Dr. Amina Husain, with Premier Eye Surgeons, said even with protective glasses, she said it’s not recommended you look too long at the eclipse.

“You can theoretically burn your retina and potentially go blind and that’s a big complication,” said Husain.

Dr. Barry Gridley, who practices at Eye Care Locale in downtown Dayton and Wing Eyecare at Austin Landing, said even on a regular day, he still sometimes sees patients with damage from looking right at the sun.

“Your retina is protein and heat fries protein and there’s nothing we can do to restore it,” Gridley said.