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Uber increases fees in Dayton 

Published: Friday, April 14, 2017 @ 11:06 AM

(Photo Illustration by David Ramos/Getty Images)
(Photo Illustration by David Ramos/Getty Images)

Taking an Uber from point A to point B now costs you more in Dayton. 

The popular ridesharing service is alerting customers of a booking fee increase. 

The booking rate increased from $1.85 to $2.20 a few weeks ago. 

>> Here’s what you need to know about Dayton's Uber service

“As a reminder, the booking fee is always included in the fare you see before you request,” reads an Uber message to its users. “Booking fees support rider and driver safety initiatives, as well as other operational costs.”  

This news organization has reached out to Uber seeking additional information. 

Uber Technologies, a vehicle-for-hire company, launched its app service in Dayton on on  August 28, 2014.

Lyft, an Uber competitor, launched on December 1. 

>> Lyft ride-sharing service launching in Dayton

On a national level, Uber has found itself embroiled in controversy in recent months. 

>> Uber sexism under investigation after female engineer’s ‘slightly horrifying’ story

>> Uber used secret program to track Lyft drivers

Dayton to open new $6 million Helena Street bridge

Published: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 @ 12:05 PM

After a 14 month closure, new bridge in Dayton about to open

The Helena Street bridge over the Great Miami River in Dayton will reopen Friday with a ribbon cutting at 2 p.m., city officials announced.

The ailing bridge was closed in the fall of 2016 for a $6 million rebuild that features wider sidewalks, improved lighting and a new middle turn lane.

RELATED: Dayton replacing Helena Street bridge for $6M

Since 1999, the city of Dayton has invested almost $65 million to replace 11 bridges.

RELATED Dayton bridge project part of investment

With the reopening of the Helena Street bridge, work will begin on replacing the nearby Keowee Street bridge over the Great Miami River. The Keowee Street bridge, which will close Monday, is providing a detour route for the Helena Street bridge through this week.

Dayton bridge projects

Here’s a look at the completed Dayton bridge projects and their cost (in reverse chronological order):

Webster Street Bridge over the Mad River

Opened: November 2, 2017

Cost: $10.1 million

Broadway Street Bridge over Wolf Creek

Opened: September 16, 2013

Cost: $2.4 million

Rosedale Drive Bridge over Wolf Creek

Opened: October 25, 2011

Cost: $1.9 million

Philadelphia Drive Bridge over Wolf Creek

Opened: January 11, 2011

Cost: $3.4 million

Edwin C. Moses Boulevard Bridge over Wolf Creek (aka the Veterans Memorial Bridge)

Opened: May 13, 2010

Cost: $4.3 million

Stewart Street Bridge over the Great Miami River

Opened: November 30, 2009

Cost: $15.4 million

Dayton Expressway Bridge over Keowee Street

Opened: November 3, 2008

Cost: $6.6 million

Paul Lawrence Dunbar Street Bridge over Wolf Creek

Opened: July 29, 2008

Cost: $2.4 million

Washington Street Bridge over the Great Miami River

Opened: December 6, 2007

Cost: $7.6 million

Findlay Street Bridge over the Mad River

Opened: May 5, 2006

Cost: $4.5 million

Premier to donate $400K to new west Dayton grocery

Published: Wednesday, December 13, 2017 @ 1:18 PM


            An architectural rendering of what the Gem City Market could look like, produced by Matt Sauer. CONTRIBUTED
An architectural rendering of what the Gem City Market could look like, produced by Matt Sauer. CONTRIBUTED

Premier Health today announced a donation of $400,000 toward a new grocery store proposed for an area of west Dayton that has limited access to fresh food.

DONATE: Valley Food Relief

The hospital system will contribute $80,000 each year for five years toward the Gem City Market, a grocery opening in 2019 on Salem Avenue just across the Great Miami River from downtown.

“This is a huge step forward for us not just in terms of the gift, but in partnership with an organization like Premier,” said Lela Klein, executive director Greater Dayton Union Co-op Initiative, the group raising money to get the market built.

Mary Boosalis, Premier’s president and CEO, was joined by former ambassador Tony Hall presenting a check to Gem City Market officials. Hall, also the region’s former Democratic congressman, served as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Agency for Food and Agriculture and returned to Dayton to start The Hall Hunger Initiative in 2015. The initiative is a partnership with the United Way of the Greater Dayton Area to collaborate with community stakeholders to reduce food insecurity.

MORE: College pay: Former UD president’s salary in top 10 at private schools

The ability to shop for affordable, nutritious food in a vast area of Dayton was already a struggle for many residents long before a fire destroyed an East Dayton store in November and an international grocery chain announced this month it was leaving Westown Shopping Center on the other side of the city, said organizers.

Organizers formed the Greater Dayton Union Co-op Initiative in 2015 to help alleviate an area food desert and bring sustainable jobs to the area.

The area that will be served by for the Gem City Market is considered a “food desert” based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture definition where more than 40 percent of the population lives more than a mile from a supermarket and has an income at 200 percent of the federal poverty line or lower.

WHIO Reports: Valley Food Relief

The group embarked on a fundraising campaign to raise $4.2 million which also included selling shares in the store for $100, which are also available on a subsidized basis to those with low incomes.

The goal is to have a 15,000-square-foot, full-service grocery up and running in the 100 block of Salem Avenue in 2019.

KITTY NEWS: Fairborn getting its very own cat cafe 

Published: Tuesday, November 07, 2017 @ 6:00 AM
Updated: Saturday, December 16, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

Fairborn City Manager Rob Anderson recently announced the StreetCats cat cafe. The initiative is design to help address the city's stray and homeless cat issues. Photo: The City of Fairborn.
Photo: The City of Fairborn.
Fairborn City Manager Rob Anderson recently announced the StreetCats cat cafe. The initiative is design to help address the city's stray and homeless cat issues. Photo: The City of Fairborn.(Photo: The City of Fairborn.)

Fairborn will soon have something to purrrr about. 

StreetCats, a volunteer-driven organization, is planning to open a “cat cafe” at 14 N. Third St. in downtown Fairborn.

>> RELATED: 22 reasons to visit Fairborn

The cafe/cat resource center is part of a tactical approach  between the city and several agencies to address the community’s stray and homeless cat population.

It will allow people a chance to play with cats, Fairborn City Manager Rob Anderson said in the recent Facebook Live  message he delivered while covered in purring cats and kittens. 

>> MORE: Dayton’s first ‘catfe’ opening soon — and here are its first tenants  

“It is not only a fun thing, but also a very important thing we are trying to do,” Anderson said in the video. “Fairborn is getting creative.” 

The cat cafe is set to open in January with the hope to expand to a larger space in the future. 

In addition to cats, there will be art classes, yoga and free WiFi, plus coffee and baked goods. 

Anderson said the cat cafe is a way to address the city’s on-going issues with homeless and stray cats in a humane way. 

The organization will help find new homes for displaced house cats and offer services that will allow cats to be dropped off to be neutered and released, said Anderson, a self-proclaimed “cat person.”

“StreetCats aims to become a lightning rod for change, a clearinghouse for information and a creative place to connect interested community members,” an email to this news organization from Anderson said. 

StreetCats will be housed in city-owned property near that city’s kitchen incubator and a co-working space in the former site of Roush's Restaurant.

The initiative has the support of a number of animal groups, Elisabeth Fitzhugh of Blue’s Mews Siamese Cat Rescues told this news organization. 

“I am actually thrilled by what (Anderson) is doing,” she said.

>> RELATED: This new Fairborn store offers horrifying oddities

>> RELATED: Pepsi moving 150 jobs to Fairborn, closing Dayton, Springfield sites

Fairborn City Manager Rob Anderson recently announced the StreetCats cat cafe. The initiative is design to help address the city's stray and homeless cat issues. Photo: The City of Fairborn.(Photo: The City of Fairborn.)

The story of the sisters who created the famous Dayton Ballet

Published: Wednesday, December 13, 2017 @ 12:06 PM

Today’s Dayton Ballet took its first steps when two sisters pushed aside their living room furniture to make room for young performers. As young girls, Josephine Schwarz and her older sister Hermene, were first mesmerized by during Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova’s performance at Memorial Hall in 1910.

Today’s Dayton Ballet took its first steps when two sisters pushed aside their living room furniture to make room for young performers. 

Josephine Schwarz and her older sister, Hermene, first mesmerized by dance in 1910, went on to found what would become the Dayton Ballet School and the Dayton Ballet. 

Here are 3 things to know about the sisters: 

Josephine (left) and Hermene Schwarz were first mesmerized by dance as small children when they saw Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova's perform at Memorial Hall in 1910. DAYTON DAILY NEWS ARCHIVE

1. A sickly child. At age 8, a case of mumps left Josephine bed ridden and fragile. To rebuild her strength and balance, she was enrolled in a local dance academy. 

>> READ MORE: In their living room, sisters set the stage for the Dayton Ballet

2. Home schooling. The siblings co-founded the Schwarz School of Dance in their home in 1927. The Schwarz School would later become the Dayton Ballet School. Josephine taught dance along with Hermene, who also designed costumes and built scenery. 

3. Influence lives on. The sisters opened their classes to black students at a time when much of the country was segregated. One of their students, Jeraldyne Blunden, went on to found the Dayton Contemporary Dance Company.

Hermene and Josephine Schwarz look over a costume in a photograph taken in 1962. DAYTON DAILY NEWS ARCHIVE