The Wizard of Oz involves Ohio politics

Published: Sunday, October 07, 2012 @ 12:00 AM
Updated: Sunday, October 07, 2012 @ 12:00 AM

“Who is this Wizard who speaks through various figureheads ….? Marcus Alonzo Hanna … a close adviser to (William) McKinley and the chairman of the Republican National Committee.”

— Rutgers Professor Hugh Rockoff

Oz is short for ounce.

The yellow brick road represents the gold bullion that once backed the dollar.

Dorothy’s slippers, changed to ruby for the Technicolor movie, were silver in the book and represent silver ingots.

Toto represents the nagging but politically ineffective voice of the teetotalers of the day.

These aren’t allegations being traded in the Sherrod Brown-Josh Mandel race.

They’re opinions of serious scholars who argue the 1900 Frank Baum classic “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” reflects the most pressing political issue of the 1896 presidential campaign and that era’s Populist political movement.

“Yes, I think it’s a story of Populism, sure,” said Larry Schweikart, professor of history at the University of Dayton. “The symbolism seems too much to ascribe to pure luck.”

The Oz-as-politics theme is of particular interest to Ohioans because the Wizard is thought to be Cleveland’s Marcus Hanna, Karl Rove’s role model.

Moreover, because of the stake farmers and laborers had in the political roil, Springfield newspapers of the time heavily endorsed the silver side, as did Springfield industrialist John Bookwalter, who in 1896 wrote the book “If Not Silver, What?”

A story, but more

In 1990 the respected Journal of Political Economy revived an academic discussion dating to the 1960s when it published “’The Wizard of Oz’ as a Monetary Allegory,” by Rutgers University’s Hugh Rockoff.

“Baum’s main purpose was to tell a story, and his need for symmetry, interesting characters,” prevented precise parallels, Rockoff writes. But the book is “rich in references” to the politics of the times, the author adds.

With the nation in an economic slide it wouldn’t face again until the 1930s, the 1896 election was a fierce fight between the Eastern financial and business establishment and the farmers and laborers of the South and West over what constituted “fair” money.

The financial establishment, championed by Ohio Republican William McKinley, argued that gold was the steadier commodity and its continued use would assured that any debts owed were paid back in dollars closest in value to the dollars lent. They also said the 16:1 ratio of silver to gold proposed by the so-called bimetallists would devalue the dollar and lead to wild speculation.

The bimetallists, led by Nebraska Democrat William Jennings Bryan, had two arguments with the gold standard:

• Because the limited supply of gold limited the supply of circulating money, parts of the United States didn’t enough cash on hand to do business. This proved a practical problem for Western farmers at harvest time and was a constant problem in the South, which had experienced massive bank failures during the Civil War.

• For many years, the stagnant supply of gold actually caused the value of the dollar to increase in a condition called deflation. As a result, debtors felt they were paying back more than they had borrowed when they paid back loans, although some historians argue the deflated prices farmers paid for other things evened things out.

If the gold-silver debate sounds strange 116 years later, some lines from Bryan’s famous “Cross of Gold” speech at the 1896 Chicago Democratic Convention could be used in this year’s campaign.

“There are two ideas of government,” Bryan said. “There are those who believe that if you just legislate to make the well-to-do prosperous, that their prosperity will leak through on those below. The Democratic idea has been that if you legislate to make the masses prosperous their prosperity will find its way up and through every class that rests upon it.”

Some argue that in “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz,” Bryan is the Cowardly Lion — cowardly because of his opposition to the Spanish American War and a lion because of his roaring power as an orator. Likewise, most of Dorothy’s entourage is a political coalition, in which the Tin Man represents factory laborers and the Scarecrow represents farmers.

For the Scarecrow

It was for the scarecrows that Bookwalter, president of Springfield’s James Leffel Co., wrote his campaign-year book “If Not Silver, What?”

“As one whose prosperity depends almost entirely on farmers,” Bookwalter wrote, “I have naturally thought most of the effect of monometallism has had, and will continue to have, upon them.”

So did The Sun, Springfield’s morning newspaper.

Reliance on the gold standard had caused, “a heavy increase in the burden of taxation and of all debts, public and private; the enrichment of the money lending class at home and abroad; (and) prostration of industry and impoverishment of the people.”

Down the road in Dayton, the Evening Herald argued the opposite.

“It is estimated that the stockholders of the silver mining companies number about 50,000 persons … considerably less than the population of (Dayton). To increase the(ir) already enormous wealth … we are asked to take a step that will add mountains of weight to the burdens … of our laboring millions.”

Dayton’s Evening News agreed, citing this paragraph from the Financial Chronicle of New York: “The only gainers by a dishonest money policy would be the big debtors, including all employers of labor, who owe great numbers of small creditors, such as depositors in savings banks, holders of insurance policies and men and women who work for fixed salaries and wages.”

Witch direction

As mentioned, the battle pitted different regions against one another. It’s for that reason, Rutgers’ Rockoff argues, that Dorothy is from Kansas, a hotbed of Populism, and that her house lands on the Wicked Witch of the East, representing Eastern banking interests.

The Good Witch of the North, where populism also was strong, gives Dorothy the silver slippers and sends her toward the Emerald City (Washington, D.C.) to confront the powers that be. And Glinda the Good Witch of the South, where Populism also took root, helps Dorothy return to Kansas.

Rockoff notes that when Dorothy and her coalition arrive in the Emerald City (a city the color of cash), they are ushered one by one into a round room (“The Oval Office?” he asks). During their separate meetings with Oz, “each sees a different character” in an exchange Rockoff says is typical of the different things people hear when talking to politicians.

“But who is this Wizard who speaks through various figureheads …?” Rockoff asks. “To a Populist at the turn of the century there is only one answer: Marcus Alonzo Hanna. A close adviser to McKinley and the chairman of the Republican National Committee, he was, in Populist mythology, the brains behind McKinley and his campaign.”

Upon taking office, McKinley arranged for Hanna to fill the U.S. Senate seat from Ohio vacated when he named Sen. John Sherman his secretary of state.

Local fallout

The Ohio Historical Society says that Springfield industrialist Asa Bushnell, whose opulent mansion on East High Street is now the Richards, Raff & Dunbar Memorial Home, was a “longtime foe of Hanna in the state (Republican) organization.”

Serving in his first term as governor when McKinley was elected president, Bushnell “delayed naming Hanna as long as possible,” the historical society says.

Bushnell was a partner in Warder, Bushnell & Glessner, meaning his economic interests were close to the so-called Silverites. But it’s not clear whether his differences with Hanna were over silver or due to Bushnell’s allegiance to his own political mentor, Joseph Foraker.

There’s no doubt, however, that after resisting Hanna’s appointment and then only narrowly winning a second term, Bushnell was aware of the real world power of the “man behind the curtain” in late 19th century American politics.

What you need to know about the 2017 solar eclipse

Published: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 @ 3:43 PM
Updated: Saturday, August 19, 2017 @ 8:00 PM

What should I not do during the Great American Eclipse in the Miami Valley?

The Great American Eclipse will be visible across the country today.

In the Miami Valley, the solar eclipse will begin shortly after 1 p.m. It will take the moon almost three hours to cross the face of the sun, from one side to the other. 

RELATED: 7 things to know about the rare total solar eclipse 

RELATED: Solar Eclipse 2017: Read this before looking at the sun

Many cities across America will see a total eclipse, but our area will only have a partial eclipse. Almost 90 percent of the sun will be eclipsed by the moon. The last total solar eclipse that passed over the Miami Valley was more than a thousand years ago.

QUIZ: How much do you know about solar eclipses? 

VIDEO: How August’s solar eclipse will look in the Miami   

RELATED: How will your pets react to the solar eclipse?

Upcoming Total Solar Eclipse Stirs Fears of Apocalypse

The last total solar eclipse that was visible in the contiguous United States was on Feb. 26, 1979.  

#SkyWitness7 has a several resources for everything you need to know about the eclipse:

There won’t be a total solar eclipse in the Miami Valley. Here’s what you need to know to safely watch the Great American Eclipse

>> RELATED: How to get your free pair of Storm Center 7 solar eclipse glasses

The Great American Eclipse will be visible across the country in August. Watch this video to learn the when the eclipse will be visible in your community

A partial eclipse will start at 1:02 p.m. and end at 3:51 p.m. in Dayton on Aug. 21. Get more facts about the Great American Eclipse here

Check out the WHIO Space Glossary to learn the difference between an annular, hybrid and lunar eclipse. 

HAVE QUESTIONS? Ask the Storm Center 7 team through their Facebook and Twitter pages. This story will be updated daily with the latest questions from you! 

An even better eclipse coming in 2024 to the Miami Valley

Q: Can I watch it with a mirror? Is the reflection safe? A: That still isn’t a safe way to view the eclipse. Using a mirror reflection is just as dangerous as staring at the sun and will allow too much sunlight into your eye.

Q: What about 3D glasses from the movie that look like the solar eclipse glasses, can I use those? A: 3D glasses from the movies may look like some of the solar eclipse glasses but they too offer no protection. They aren’t made of the same filter. Only ISO compliant solar eclipse glasses have the proper solar filter to directly watch the eclipse. Solar eclipse glasses reduce the amount of sunlight down to a safe level for your eyes since the sun is so bright and also produces ultraviolet radiation that can cause permanent eye damage if you look at it with the wrong equipment. Remember, multiple pairs of sunglasses won’t work either. If you can’t get the proper solar eclipse glasses, watch it online with us on Aug 21st from 1-4 p.m. or make a pinhole projector. 

Q: If we are going to have a solar eclipse does it mean that those on the other side of earth will have a lunar eclipse? What will be happening in Australia during our solar eclipse? Do they experience it a day ahead of us?  A: A lunar eclipse occurs when the sun, earth and moon align. Earth moves in between the sun and the moon, blocking sunlight to the moon’s surface. This will not be the case this time around as the orbit of the moon will pass between the sun and earth creating a solar eclipse instead. Because the moon’s orbit is titled, as it continues its path around the earth it will move out of the direct alignment with the sun, ending the eclipse. At the time of the eclipse in the U.S., it will be night in Australia. They will have a dark sky, but no moon as the moon is on our side of the globe. This also means it’s not possible for them to have a lunar eclipse. In order for that to happen the moon would have to be on the Australia side with Earth traveling between the moon and the sun.

Q: What are chances that we will have cloudy skies on eclipse day?

A: During summer, there’s always is a good chance that clouds could develop during the heat of the day. The solar eclipse will occur between 1:02 p.m. and 3:51 p.m. in Dayton. Based on historical cloudiness data from the NOAA National Center for Environmetal Information 10-year hourly climate normals dataset, there is a 20 percent chance of an overcast day. Anything less should allow for better conditions to see the eclipse at some point.

>> Download the FREE Storm Center 7 app

Q: How will shadows look during the solar eclipse? 

A: Your shadow on a normal day will show your general shape. During a solar eclipse, a partial one like we will see, the light from the sun will be more focused (about a sliver will remain during max eclipse). This allows the sunlight to come from a smaller source and your shadow to become more defined. According to Rick Fienberg, from the American Astronomical Society, you can see such a sharp image of your shadow that the arms on your hair will be visible. Another interesting thing you could see because we won’t be in the path of totality is objects like trees casting crescent shaped shadows. Like a pinhole projector, the hole between leaves on a tree act to project the solar eclipse on the ground creating crescent shaped shadows! Here’s an example from NASA’s picture of the day

Q: What happens more often -- solar or lunar eclipses? 

A: Solar eclipses are fairly numerous, about two to four per year, but the area on the ground covered by totality is only about 50 miles wide. In any given location on Earth, a total eclipse happens only once every hundred years or so. However, for some "lucky" locations they can occur as little as a few years apart. An example is the Aug. 21, 2017 and April 8, 2024, eclipses, which will be viewed at the same spot near Carbondale, Illinois. The eclipse will also be total in the Miami Valley in 2024. Eclipses of the Moon by the Earth's shadow are actually less numerous than solar eclipses; however, each lunar eclipse is visible from over half the Earth. At any given location, you can have up to three lunar eclipses per year, but some years there may be none. In any one calendar year, the maximum number of eclipses is four solar and three lunar.

Q: How do I know if my solar eclipse glasses are safe to use?

A: You will want to make sure you are using solar eclipse glasses or a viewfinder only, says Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini. Sunglasses, 3D movie glasses or anything else will not be safe enough to view the solar eclipse with.

When you have glasses make sure that they have an “ISO” icon on them and that they have this sequence of numbers (ISO 12312-2). You also want to check the manufacturer. Some popular companies that certify their glasses include, Rainbow Symphony, American Paper Optics, Thousand Oaks Optical or TSE 17.

Making sure you get them directly through the manufacturer, a local library or from one of the WHIO giveaways will help to ensure you indeed have the right type of solar eclipse glasses.

If you can’t get glasses in time you can enjoy the eclipse by watching live videos from 1 to 4 p.m. Aug. 21 on WHIO-TV, online at whio.com and on the WHIO Facebook page. Also, learn how to make your own viewfinder here.

Q: Is it true there is another, better eclipse coming to Dayton?

A: Yes! If we miss the eclipse on Aug. 21, we won’t have to wait to long to get another shot. The next eclipse will be even better for Dayton as it will be a total solar eclipse in our area. It will occur on April 8, 2024 and if the skies are clear (that’s a big if), it should be spectacular as it will occur right around lunchtime! So set your alarm or mark your calendars!

Q: Are there different types of solar eclipses? 

A: Yes. A total solar eclipse (like the one Aug. 21) occurs when the sun, moon and Earth are directly in line. The people in the center of the moons shadow along its path from coast to coast will see the moon completely block the sun and it will get darker for a few minutes. A partial solar eclipse occurs when the sun, moon and Earth aren’t perfectly in line. This allows the moon to still obstruct the sun’s surface but only part of it. Finally, an annular solar eclipse still needs a line-up of the sun, moon and earth but this time the moon is farthest from the Earth. This means that the moon looks smaller from our perspective and will cover the sun but appear to leave a ring of brightness around it. You can read more about them here.

Q: Will gravity change that day?  

A: As crazy as it sounds, yes the gravitational force felt here on Earth will be different during the solar eclipse on Aug. 21. According to NASA, the average person will feel about 1.7 ounces lighter because the moon and sun will have a gravitational pull in the same direction, which will be opposite the Earth’s gravitational force.

Q: How long will the solar eclipse last when watching in the Miami Valley?

A: In Dayton, the moon will begin to eclipse the sun around 1:02 p.m. Then, the maximum eclipse or when the moon will cover most of the sun (about 89 percent in Dayton) is at 2:28 p.m. The eclipse will end around 3:51 p.m. This will make the eclipse about two hours and 50 minutes from start to finish. You can get the timing of the eclipse down to the second by finding your city right here.

Q: Where is the best place within 50 miles of Dayton to see the eclipse?

A: The farther southwest you go, the greater the eclipse will be. However, there will not be much variability within 50 miles of Dayton. For example, the sun will be eclipsed by the moon by approximately 89 percent in Dayton. In Cincinnati, it will be 91 percent eclipsed. You would have to travel to southwestern Kentucky or middle Tennessee to see the total eclipse. Keep in mind, experts are warning of extremely heavy traffic on the day of the eclipse thanks to the “eclipse-chasers,” so be prepared! For details on the eclipse and its start, peak and end times in your part of the Miami Valley, go to whio.com and click on #SkyWitness7 

Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini talks about the timing of the eclipse

Q: What time does a solar eclipse occur? 

A: A solar eclipse happens only when a new moon occurs for the month and the orbit of the moon lines up between the Earth and the sun just right to produce a shadow on the Earth. We have a new moon each month but not always a solar eclipse because of the moon’s orbit. Each solar eclipse begins around sunrise at some point in the path and ends around sunset in a different location at the end of the path. Specific timing of what you see depends on your location. In Dayton,  the max eclipse time will be around 2:28 p.m. The next total solar eclipse in the U.S. is April 8, 2024. 

You can find the specific timing of the start, max and end of the eclipse in YOUR city by clicking here.

Q: What makes this a total solar eclipse? 

A: The Great American Solar Eclipse on Aug. 21 will be a total eclipse, which means the sun will be completely covered by the moon. There are usually 2 and up to 5 solar eclipses every year, but they are usually not total. But on Aug. 21, parts of the country will be in the path of totality, meaning that the sun will be completely covered. In the path of totality, it will be safe to look directly at the sun. Outside of the path of totality, which is where we are, it is NOT safe to look directly at the sun.

Q: Will there be a temperature change when the solar eclipse happens?

A: Yes. As the moon moves in front of the sun, there will be a noticeable change in temperature. It will get darker and feel cooler because the sun’s rays will be blocked by the moon.

Q: Can we look directly at the eclipse or do we need special glasses?  

A: Because we will not be in the path of totality in the Miami Valley, it is not safe to look directly at the eclipse, even during the maximum locally. We will get about an 89 percent eclipse, meaning the moon will cover 89 percent of the sun. This means that roughly 11 percent of the sun will still shine during the maximum. The best way you can see the eclipse is with special glasses or by creating your own viewfinder. 

Q: Do I need a special filter for my camera to take pictures or video fof the eclipse?

A: While there are different makes and models of cameras, the short answer is yes. Most cameras are not made to shoot the sun directly. The best option is to get a filter that will fit your camera to safely shoot the eclipse. Without a filter, you run the risk of damaging your device. As for what kind of filter you need, the best thing to do is contact the manufacturer and see what filter they recommend.

Q: What is the umbra and penumbra? 

A: The umbra and penumbra are different parts of the shadow created by the eclipse. In the case of the Great American Solar Eclipse, the umbra is the shadow that is darkest and is what creates the path of totality. The penumbra is what everyone outside of the path of totality in the continental United States will see during the eclipse.

Q: If we have a solar eclipse, does it mean that those on the other side of Earth have a lunar eclipse? What will be happening in Australia during our solar eclipse?

A: A lunar eclipse occurs when the sun, Earth and moon align. Earth moves in between the sun and moon, blocking sunlight to the moon. This will not be the case this time as the orbit of the moon will pass between the sun and Earth, creating a solar eclipse intead. Because the moon’s orbit is tilted, as it continues its path around Earth it will move out of the direct alignment with the sun, ending the eclipse. During the eclipse in the U.S., it will be night in Australia. They will have a dark sky, but no moon as the moon is on our side of the globe. This also mean’s it’s not possible for them to have a lunar eclipse.

Q. What should I not do during the Great American Eclipse?

A. Here’s a list of DO NOTs dor the Great American Eclipse:

  • Don’t look directly at the sun without the proper eye protection, even during the maximum.
  • Don’t photograph the eclipse without the proper filter for your camera or smartphone. 
  • Don’t forget the times. It starts at 1:02 p.m., maxes at 2:28 p.m. and ends at 3:51 p.m. in Dayton. 
  • Don’t spend too much time photographing the event. Take time to enjoy and take in this rare event; a lot of photos will be available on social media. 
  • Don’t look at the eclipse while driving. This poses a danger to not only you, but to others around you. 
  • Don’t forget to charge your device prior to the event. 
  • Don’t forget that traffic jams may occur the afternoon, even in places that are not in the path of totality. 
  • Don’t be sad or upset that we’re not in the path of totality. We will be in April 2024. 

Don’t worry about NOT seeing the eclipse if there are clouds. We have you covered with our facebook live/live stream on WHIO.com.

Q: What do I need to do to be a part of your eclipse coverage Monday? 

A: We would love for anyone and everyone to be part of our eclipse coverage on Monday. You can send us your photos and videos via social media using the hashtag #SkyWitness7, tagging our pages, or emailing them to us. It's important to know though that we want to make sure everyone is safe during the eclipse, so only take direct photos or video of the sun if you have the proper filter for your camera or device. Aside from that, we want to see how you are viewing the eclipse so please send them to us. Some will be shown on our Facebook live and on WHIO-TV Ch 7!

Fatal crash: Schools close after deaths of 2 Clark County HS students

Published: Sunday, August 20, 2017 @ 4:00 PM
Updated: Monday, August 21, 2017 @ 1:48 AM

Fatal crash: Schools close after deaths of 2 Clark County HS students

Two Clark County high school students were killed in a Sunday afternoon rollover crash in Greene County that led Greenon Local Schools and Global Impact STEM Academy to close.

LOCAL NEWS: U.S. 35 E crash kills one in Dayton

  • Crash kills David Waag, Connor Williams
  • Crash closes Greenon, Global Impact schools Monday
  • Driver, 18, and juvenile passenger injured

LOCAL NEWS: Man, 51, killed in Clark County crash

Community members came together Sunday night at the Greenon High School football field to grieve the loss of the two boys. Some brought candles, others illuminated cellphones to light the night in honor of David Waag and Connor Williams.

LOCAL NEWS: What you need to know about the 2017 solar eclipse

Waag, a senior at Greenon High School, and Williams, a student at Global Impact STEM Academy, were riding in the back seat of a car headed east just before 6 p.m. in the 500 block of Wilkerson Road in Bath Twp.

“It appears in our investigation that they drifted off the right side of the road, over-corrected, went off the left side, hit a tree and then overturned,” Sgt. Paul Lezotte of the Ohio State Highway Patrol’s Xenia Post.

The crash also injured the 18-year-old driver, a recent Greenon graduate, and another Greenon High student who was riding in the front seat. They were both taken to Soin Medical Center in Beavercreek with injuries that were not life-threatening. Troopers said none of the occupants were wearing seat belts.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation.

UPDATE @ 10:15 p.m.

Global Impact STEM Academy also has decided to close Monday in the wake of the death of one of its students.

The school sent out a “One Call” phone message and posted on social media to alert families.

UPDATE @ 8:45 p.m.

Greenon High School confirmed that two of its students were killed this afternoon in a two-vehicle crash.

The district identified the students as David Waag and Connor Williams.

The school will now be closed, according to a social media post, but counselors will be available from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Greenon.

“After careful consideration of our need to support our students during this difficult time and protect all students during tomorrow’s solar eclipse, we are cancelling school so that we can ensure the safety and emotional well-being of all students and staff.”

A candlelight vigil is underway at the high school football stadium.

Waag, a senior soccer player, last year was second-team All-Central Buckeye Conference Mad River Division as a junior. Williams, a sophomore, played football and attended Global Impact STEM Academy.

Greenon Athletic Director Adam Billet said he was not ready to comment, but said “they were great kids.”

A third Greenon student and a recent graduate also were injured in the crash.

The district had activities in place for the eclipse, but district spokeswoman said that with the deaths of two students in the tight-knit community it would be too much of a strain on the staff.

UPDATE @ 8:30 p.m.

Two boys from an area high school were killed this afternoon in a single-car rollover crash in Greene County.

The boys were in the back seat of a car that was traveling east in the 500 block of Wilkerson Road when it veered to the right, then went off the road to the left and struck a tree. the vehicle landed on its side, according to the Ohio State Highway Patrol. None of the four male occupants were wearing seat belts but non were ejected in the crash, troopers said.

The driver, who is 18, went to Soin Medical Center in Beavercreek. A juvenile front-seat passenger lived nearby and went home before he later went to Soin for treatment, the patrol said.

The names of those in the crash have not been released, and the crash remains under investigation.

UPDATE @ 4:50 p.m.

Two passengers have died in an afternoon single-vehicle rollover crash in Bath Twp. near Fairborn, according to the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

The driver was taken to Soin Medical Center in Beavercreek with injuries that were described as not life-threatening. Troopers are still looking for another passenger who fled the crash on foot. It is unknown whether that person is injured.

The crash site is not far from the Greene County border with Clark County.

UPDATE @ 4:15 p.m.

One person has died this afternoon in a rollover crash in Bath Twp. near Fairborn, according to the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

CareFlight was canceled in the crash that injured up to three others.

FIRST REPORT

Crews were called to a rollover crash with serious injuries this afternoon near Fairborn.

The crash was reported shortly before 4 p.m. in the 500 block of Wilkerson Road. A CareFlight medical helicopter was placed on standby.

According to initial reports, there were four occupants in the vehicle with three possibly trapped and another person who may have fled the crash on foot.

We are on the way and will update this report.

Man, 51, killed in Clark County crash

Published: Sunday, August 20, 2017 @ 2:04 PM

A 51-year-old Catawba man was killed in a crash on Redmond Road south of Old Columbus Road Saturday night, according to the Ohio Highway Patrol.

Gary Jacks was driving a 2011 Chevrolet Traverse south on Redmond when he drove off the left side of the road and struck a tree, troopers said.  He was not wearing a seat belt and troopers do not suspect drugs nor alcohol as playing a factor in the crash, OSP said.

LOCAL NEWS: Victim ID’d in fatal Trotwood fire

The crash was reported around 9:30 p.m.

Jacks was pronounced dead at the scene.

Great American Eclipse: More clearing than clouds

Published: Sunday, August 20, 2017 @ 12:17 PM
Updated: Sunday, August 20, 2017 @ 6:15 PM

Great American Eclipse forecast for the Dayton area

Monday is the Great American Eclipse, and all eyes are on the forecast. 

The biggest question is: Will we be able to see the solar eclipse?

Long-range weather models have indicated a dry forecast. However, higher resolution models now indicate a slight chance for rain.

RELATED: Everything you need to know about the eclipse

The setup for Monday is painting a hot and muggy picture. High temperatures will be in the upper 80s, with some spots reaching the lower 90s. The humidity will lead to heat index values in the lower to middle 90s. That higher moisture also is why an isolated shower or two will be possible in the afternoon.

Solar Eclipse 2017: Read this before looking at the sun

Daytime clouds are expected in the afternoon. These clouds will be somewhat scattered, so there will be chances to see the eclipse as the clouds pass overhead. Some of these clouds could give way to an isolated shower or two. These rain chances are slim, and most look to stay dry. Even if we do see a few showers develop, there will still be a chance to see the eclipse at times Monday afternoon.

QUIZ: How much do you know about solar eclipses?

If you are planning on being outside Monday afternoon, it's important to stay cool, hydrated and wear sunscreen as the UV index will be high.