Puppies sold at pet stores linked to Ohio outbreak, six other states

Published: Monday, September 11, 2017 @ 1:12 PM

Puppies sold at Petland are linked as the likely source of an infection outbreak in Ohio and six other states.

The outbreak of the infection, which can spread to people from puppies and dogs, has been linked to 39 people reported sick including nine hospitalizations, though no deaths have been reported, according to the Ohio Department of Health and Centers for Disease Control. People with the Campylobacter infection might show no signs of illness or might have diarrhea, vomiting, or a fever.

Petland said in a statement that “The CDC has not identified any failures of Petland’s operating system that would lead to any campylobacter infection. Petland reinforces proper hand sanitization before and after playing with any of our puppies with the many sanitation stations in each store and has strict kennel sanitation procedures and protocols put in place by consulting veterinarians. The CDC stated that ‘regardless of where they came from, any puppy and dog’ can carry the germ. However, Petland is the only national source of puppies that can trace a puppy from its new owner back to its original kennel. Petland is proud of our commitment to quality controls and record keeping and we are happy to help the CDC in this new endeavor.”

Locally, Petland has a store in the Miller Lane area at 3444 York Commons Blvd.

The agencies said in a statement that evidence links puppies sold at Petland as the likely source of the outbreak and Petland is “cooperating with public health and animal health officials to address this outbreak.”

The CDC advises:

Wash your hands thoroughly after touching dogs, their poop, or their food. Take extra care that children playing with the puppies also wash their hands carefully.

  • Pick up and dispose of dog poop, especially in areas where children might play.

  • Contact your veterinarian if you notice any signs of illness in your puppy or dog.

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    Vandalia police activity connected to suicidal person

    Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 10:21 AM
    Updated: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 11:00 AM

    Vandalia police and fire block Buttercup Avenue

    UPDATE @ 11 a.m.

    Police blocked portions of Buttercup Avenue and Gabriel Street in Vandalia to investigate a person who made suicidal threats, according to investigators. 

    The incident is being investigated as a suicide attempt, police said. 

    FIRST REPORT

    We’re working to learn more about police activity reported on Buttercup Avenue in Vandalia Friday morning. 

    Police and fire crews are on scene and have blocked the area of Buttercup Avenue and Gabriel Street at Buttercup Avenue. 

    Additional details were not immediately available. 

    We have a crew on the scene and we’ll update this page as we learn more. 

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    Fire ‘out and contained’ at Mason business

    Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 10:49 AM
    Updated: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 11:33 AM

    
            Monroe firefighters were called to a fire this morning in Mason, but their help was called off before they went into action. GREG LYNCH/STAFF
    Monroe firefighters were called to a fire this morning in Mason, but their help was called off before they went into action. GREG LYNCH/STAFF

    A fire, originally reported as being large, at Premier Packaging, 4219 S. U.S. 42, was out within about 45 minutes.

    Although a second alarm had been sent, that call for assistance from other departments was called off.

    Ivery Campbell, warehouse manager for Premier Packaging, estimated employees were able to reoccupy the building at about 10:30, 50 minutes after the fire was reported.

    “It’s out and contained,” Campbell said. The fire occurred at one of two companies that share the building with Premier, Eco Development and PAX Corrugated Products.

    Liberty Twp. firefighters were among those on the scene, but Monroe, whose assistance also had been requested, returned to its jurisdiction.

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    3 things to know about Dayton, Wright-Patt and drinking water

    Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 10:03 AM

    Dayton confronts two Mad River well field sites that face contamination threats from contaminants in firefighting foam. One is at the city’s fire training facility site off Springfield Street shown here, and the other is Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, city officials say. The Mad River, right, flows past the Dayton fire training facility. TY GREENLEES / STAFF
    Dayton confronts two Mad River well field sites that face contamination threats from contaminants in firefighting foam. One is at the city’s fire training facility site off Springfield Street shown here, and the other is Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, city officials say. The Mad River, right, flows past the Dayton fire training facility. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

    Dayton city leaders said this week they’re concerned about two potential threats to well fields along the Mad River from firefighting foam contaminants.

    One potential source of contamination is at the city’s firefighting training center on McFadden near the Tait’s Hill well field. The other potential source of contamination is from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, where a tainted groundwater plume was believed to be approaching production wells at Huffman Dam, city and state officials say.

    The contaminant is known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS.

    The city shut down both well fields over the past two years as a precaution, Dayton officials said. The two well fields stand about three miles apart.

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    State and city officials say the water is safe and the contaminant has not been found in finished product to consumers.

    Here’s a look at key developments this week:

    1. The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency and Wright-Patterson officials say they did not know of the firefighting training center concerns until recent days. Among other actions, the state EPA this week directed Dayton to test treated water at its Ottawa treatment plant near the Mad River monthly for the contaminant beginning March 31, and to determine the source of the contamination. Late last year, the city detected PFAS at less than 10 parts per trillion in a raw water intake at the plant, officials said. The U.S. EPA has a health advisory threshold of 70 parts per trillion for lifetime exposure to drinking water.

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    2. Dayton asked area city managers this month to co-sign a letter urging Wright-Patterson and the Air Force to act more quickly to resolve concerns a groundwater contamination plume could reach the Huffman Dam well field. The response to the city request thus far has been mixed.

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    3. Dayton, Ohio EPA, and Wright-Patterson authorities most recently met this week in ongoing talks about how to handle groundwater contamination concern.

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    1 of 2 Fairborn middle school students arrested for alleged threats appear in court

    Published: Thursday, February 22, 2018 @ 7:57 AM
    Updated: Thursday, February 22, 2018 @ 11:50 AM

    Police at Fairborn High School

    UPDATE @ 9:49 a.m. (Feb. 23):

    One of the two middle school students arrested on accusations they made threats prompting a lockdown at Fairborn High School Thursday appeared in court Friday.

    The judge entered a plea of denial for the 11-year-old girl, who was charged with inducing panic.

    The girl was ordered to stay in custody at juvenile detention.

    The second child, the 12-year-old boy, did not appear as paperwork for the court was still in process, officials said.

    UPDATE @ 11:50 a.m.:

    Two middle school students have been arrested and charged for making threats that prompted a lockdown at Fairborn High School Thursday morning. 

    “The lockdown was due to a social media post that indicated Fairborn High School students and teachers were possibly in danger,” Fairborn police said in a media release.

    MORE COVERAGE:

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    Police originally said the lockdown was due to the vague threats, including a viral threat to an “SHS” school that multiple area schools investigated.

    MORE:  

    Police arrested two students from Baker Middle School in connection to the social media threats. An 11-year-old female was charged with inducing panic, and making terroristic  threats. A 12-year-old male was charged with inducing panic and aggravated menacing. 

    “Police Chief (Terry) Barlow advised that any and all social media posts that threaten the safety of our schools, students and staff will be prosecuted to the fullest extend of the law, regardless of the violator’s age,” according to the release. 

    UPDATE @ 8:19 a.m.:

    The lockdown at Fairborn High School has been lifted after police checked the building following a threat made on social media involving “SHS.”

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    INITIAL REPORT:

    Fairborn High School is on a precautionary lockdown this morning on recommendation from police after various threats have been talked about in the area, school officials said.

    The lockdown was in place at 7:50 a.m. and officials said there are no specific threats targeting the district.

    We’re working to learn more. 

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