Pet owner turns over every rock for return of pet turtle

Published: Tuesday, July 31, 2012 @ 8:06 PM
Updated: Tuesday, July 31, 2012 @ 8:06 PM

More than a week of signs, newspaper ads and a pet detective paid off Tuesday for an Oakwood woman searching for a missing 10-year-old turtle.

An open sliding patio door allowed Nike, a 10-inch long Red-Earred Slider Turtle, to escape her Oakwood home on July 22, according to Nike’s owner, Samia Borchers, a local dermatologist. “My husband opened it slightly for air,” Borchers said. “He did not calculate that the turtle could go through sideways, which is what happened. The turtle fell about four feet to the ground and took off from the balcony.”

Borchers took out ads, offered a $100 reward, and hired a Cincinnati pet-tracker - who charges around $600 for his services, not including travel time - to come to Oakwood and follow Nike’s trail. All, until Tuesday, for naught.

Then Jonathan Patterson, 27, of Kettering called. He found the turtle while driving on Far Hills Avenue on July 23. “I wanted to stop and help this turtle before it got ran over so we stopped traffic. Held everybody up, went and got the turtle,” Patterson said.

He contacted Borchers on Tuesday evening after an acquaintance told his stepmother about the lost turtle ad she saw in the Dayton Daily News. The stepmother then called Patterson.

“I’m an animal lover. Animal, people, life,” Patterson said of why he stopped for the turtle. “If somebody is in need I can’t really help but stop and do what I can.”

Borchers was already moving through the grieving process. “I was just starting to accept the fact that someone nice picked her up,” she said Tuesday. “I was hoping that a nice person either kept her as a pet or put her in a lake. I just can’t believe it. The chance of her making it back home, is unbelievable.”

When Patterson met Borchers at her house she called him a hero and told him he would receive a $100 reward. “I just did what anybody would do for a hurt creature. I took it in and helped it. I don’t know if that’s heroic, but I am glad I could be a hero for somebody,” Patterson said.

Samia Borchers husband, William, said his wife had not spoken to him for days because of the missing turtle.

“She’s thrilled to have her turtle back. I’m thrilled too for her,” William Borchers said.

“I’m surprised that (the turtle’s disappearance) upsets me as much as it did,” Borchers said prior Nike’s return. She admitted that some might find her actions to get Nike back as a waste of time, but they are mistaken. “You can think of a dog and a cat that way. I feel like I have always taken care of this turtle. I just feel like its not getting cared for right now.”

Borchers went so far as hiring Jim Berns of Pet Search and Rescue to help find Nike. “In five years, we’ve had no calls for turtles and in the last month, we’ve had two,” said Berns, a pet detective based in Cincinnati. He used a coon hound and then a blood hound to track Nike’s scent to Far Hills Avenue.

Nike was a gift from a family friend in Florida who drove the little turtle to Ohio 10 years ago. At the time, Borchers was seeking a turtle for her daughter after two previous ones had died.

Borchers even took the turtle on walks in the neighborhood, sometimes turning him sidewides so people would think she was a purse. She feared if she didn’t, they would stare.

When asked if hiring a pet detective to search for a turtle was going to the extreme, Berns said, “Love doesn’t make any sense. When you are attached to your pet, it becomes a member of your family…(My clients) are really really attached to their pets.”

Red-Earred Slider Turtles cost about $15. They are regulated by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and owners must pay $25 each year to renew their permit to possess once, since it is a native reptile, said Ron Ollis, ODNR’s Law Enforcement Program administrator.

Warren Co. teen reportedly suffers serious injuries following dog attack

Published: Saturday, September 23, 2017 @ 1:16 PM

Warren County Chief Dog Warden, Nathan Harper, right, and Deputy Dog Warden, Eric Hancock, keep a close eye on Warren County strays. Jim Noelker/Dayton Daily News
Warren County Chief Dog Warden, Nathan Harper, right, and Deputy Dog Warden, Eric Hancock, keep a close eye on Warren County strays. Jim Noelker/Dayton Daily News

Police are responding to a Ridgeville home after a teen was reporteldy bitten by a pit bull Saturday afternoon.

Crews were sent to the 6400 block of West Street after a caller reported a 16-year-old girl had suffered a dog bite. 

Initial reports indicate a family member is driving the teen to the hospital while the dog warden is called to the house. 

The teen's injuries have been described as significant, according to scanner traffic. 

Initial reports indicate the dog has attacked a family member in the past. 

Our newsroom is working to confirm multiple details in this developing story.

GOT A TIP? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

Medics requested at scene of Xenia crash involving fire response vehicle

Published: Saturday, September 23, 2017 @ 12:43 PM

Police and medics are responding to the scene of an injury crash involving a fire response vehicle Saturday morning.

Crews were dispatched to the intersection of West Second Street and Progress Drive around 12:25 p.m. 

Initial reports indicate a medic has been called to the scene for an injured patient. 

Dispatchers could not confirm if the injured person was in the fire response vehicle. 

Traffic in the area is currently being rerouted, according to dispatchers. 

We will continue to follow updates in this developing story.

GOT A TIP? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

Family of Springfield woman found in crashed car looks for answers

Published: Friday, September 22, 2017 @ 8:00 PM

The family of a Springfield woman found dead in a crashed car last week says they have a lot of questions about what caused her death.

Chelsea Marie Dowler, 27, was found in a 1993 Dodge Dakota on Sept. 14. The car left the roadway and struck a tree before coming to rest in Delaware County’s Kingston Twp. north of Columbus, according to the Delaware Post of the State Highway Patrol, but it’s unclear when the crash happened.

She had been missing for nearly four weeks, according to her brother, Tyler Dowler.

“It’s definitely a little bit easier than not knowing,” Tyler Dowler said. “Not knowing was the worst.”

The family had filed a missing person report with the Springfield Police Department, he said, and had handed out flyers and made posts online asking for information about his sister.

“It gives us a little bit of relief knowing that she’s not in pain anymore,” he said. “She’s not suffering.”

But he said he wants more answers.

“Did she wreck? Did someone force her to wreck? Was it drugs? We’d like to know,” he said.

An investigation into the crash is ongoing, said Lt. Bob Sellers with the Delaware Post of the State Highway Patrol.

Chelsea Dowler leaves behind two sons, a 4-year-old and a 6-year-old. Tyler Dowler and his girlfriend are now the guardians of the boys.

RELATED: Springfield woman found in crashed car may have died weeks ago

“Things are finally starting to come together a little bit. I think they’re happy,” Tyler Dowler said. “They don’t want to go anywhere.”

She struggled with drug addiction, he said, but was a good mother.

“She was loving you know, she had her problems as most of us do,” he said.

He wants the boys to remember their mom for the good times they shared.

“The times where their mom did nothing but make them smile,” he said, “because she would, she would do anything in her power to make them smile.”

The Springfield Police Division has closed its missing person investigation, according to Capt. Mike Varner.

The family is still in the process of making funeral arrangements.

Springboro police chief serves as chaplain during hurricane recovery

Published: Saturday, September 23, 2017 @ 10:00 AM


            Springboro Police Chief Jeff Kruithof photographed the devastation from Hurricane Harvey in the area around Rockport, Texas.
Springboro Police Chief Jeff Kruithof photographed the devastation from Hurricane Harvey in the area around Rockport, Texas.

For two weeks, Springboro Police Chief Jeff Kruithoff offered a sympathetic ear and other assistance to first responders in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

More than 80 people died and countless injuries reported as Harvey flooded and leveled coastal and inland communities after making landfall with winds of 130 mph at Rockport, Texas, on Aug. 25.

Over the next five days, the storm flooded hundreds of thousands of homes, leaving more than 30,000 people homeless and prompting more than 17,000 rescues.

In Rockport, Kruithoff and another chaplain with law enforcement experience “debriefed” police, fire, ambulance and dispatch workers scrambling to help all the victims.

“We were really able to help a lot of people process the storm,” Kruithoff said.

“Dispatchers were terribly affected,” he recalled, sitting in the conference room at city hall. “They can’t do anything if they don’t have anyone to dispatch.”

MORE: 3rd graders read to help Hurricane Harvey victims

Kruithoff was among 60 Rapid Response Chaplains sent to the disaster by Billy Graham Ministries.

The program developed after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, and since then, the chaplains have used their special training to assist in more than 260 crises around the world.

They bring to bear “the compassion of Jesus Christ” and “the ability to listen,” said Scott Holmquist of the North Carolina-based ministries.

MORE: Wright-Patt crews help Texas rescue efforts

“They are in the mix,” Holmquist added, gauging where those they are helping are in processing “grief due to loss.”

Kruithoff was on the ground amid the catastrophe from Aug. 29 to Sept. 10.

It was his second deployment, after supporting workers with Samaritan’s Purse, an evangelical Christian humanitarian aid founded by Franklin Graham in recovery efforts after floods in Ripley County, Miss.

Franklin Graham, the son of Billy Graham, now heads the organization’s web of faith-based programs.

MORE: How to help Hurricane Harvey victims

Kruithoff estimated he prayed with 25 to 50 workers and victims a day, in addition to engaging individuals in talks designed to allow them to work through traumatic stress that comes with experiencing such a disaster.

“We don’t come in and hit them with a Bible over the head,” he said. “We let them tell their story.”

The cathartic process typically takes five to nine such talks, Kruithoff said.

“We want people to remember the incident, but not relive the incident,” he said.

In addition, chaplains encourage those traumatized to find several things they liked before the storm, maybe golf or going for a walk, but to move on, rather than expect to return to life as before the storm.

“There’s a new reality,” he said, adding the chaplains also encourage healthy habits, including eating and drinking enough, and help work through sleep problems.

With permission, the chaplains end sessions with a prayer.

Kruithoff and Holmquist acknowledged the program offers a chance to rededicate lives to Christ.

“We will never take advantage of people,” Holmquist said. “We will use the circumstance to meet them at their place of need.”

During his Texas work, Kruithoff listened to firefighters recalling walls of their station move six to eight inches.

“They had to tie their bay doors to their fire trucks so they didn’t blow out,” he said.

Kruithoff rented a car and began driving to Houston after evacuation centers were opened there.

“I had to take some detours because of flooded roads,” he said.

At one point, he disregarded GPS directions to turn down a gravel road between Corpus Christi and Houston.

Luckily, he soon came upon a trucker who he followed “until we got to a state highway.”

In Houston, Kruithoff presented a Bible to Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo and coordinated the “faith response” to the police department and sheriff’s office.

MORE: Houston perserveres through immense loss

During line-ups at shift openings, Kruithoff would offer a prayer for officers about to go out onto the storm-ravaged streets.

“I don’t know if I’ve ever seen police, regardless of their spiritual faith, turning down a prayer going into a shift,” he said.

Kruithoff is part of a new group of chaplains with law-enforcement experience in the program.

When asked about the apparent contrast between police and religious work, Kruithoff said, “There were only two things I was going to be in my life, a minister or a policeman.”

Still, he acknowledged the two frames of reference sometimes conflict, placing obstacles in the way of his “faith walk.”

As Kruithoff worked in Houston, Springboro officials expressed their support and gratitude during a Sept. 7 city council meeting.

MORE: Hurricane response delays Springboro intersection work

“We commend him, we thank him and we’ve been communicating with him so that he stays safe,” City Manager Christine Thompson said.

Mayor John Agenbroad added, “That’s what America is all about, helping out when somebody’s down.”