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US officials say ISIS recruiter influenced Ohio State attacker

Published: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 @ 2:16 PM

Gov. John Kasich said: "This is just an incredible and magnificent place. So when I heard that this morning, of course, I right away thought about the stab wounds, the perhaps the gunfire and frankly took a piece out of everybody here at our beautiful Ohio State University that this could have happened here."

A man accused of influencing numerous terrorist attacks, including the Ohio State University attacker during Thanksgiving weekend last year, has been sanctioned by the U.S. Department of the Treasury.  

Abdullah Ibrahim al-Faisal, a Jamaica-based recruiter for the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, was sanctioned by the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control. He is believed to have directly or indirectly influenced numerous terrorists, including OSU student Abdul Razak Ali Artan who drove a 2002 silver Honda Civic onto a crowded sidewalk on Nov. 28, 2016.  
» MUST-READ COVERAGE: OSU releases records, videos from terrorist attack on campus

He then jumped out of the car and began slashing people with a large kitchen knife. Security cameras captured images of the Civic driving on campus but not the actual attack.  

“Faisal has recruited for and provided support to ISIS and his actions have influenced terrorists who engaged in bomb plots and other horrific attacks on innocent civilians,” said OFAC Director John E. Smith. “This designation will help deter Faisal’s global following and prevent U.S. persons from supporting him in any manner.”

» MORE: Fairfield grad who shot OSU attacker a ‘stand-up guy’

The sanction designation means all property and interests in property of Abdullah Ibrahim al-Faisal’s in the U.S. are blocked, and U.S. persons are prohibited from engaging in transactions with him.  According to a state of New York indictment, Faisal is accused of recruiting others to travel to ISIS-controlled territory and, in concert with other individuals, using online applications and networks to facilitate the travel of others to join ISIS by providing them with contacts outside of the United States and advice on how to evade detection by law enforcement.  

» RELATED: Officer who stopped attack honored

Faisal is also accused of directly or indirectly influencing: Faisal Shahzad, the attempted Times Square bomber in New York City in 2010; Mohammed Chowdury, who planned and attempted to bomb the London Stock Exchange in 2010; Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, the underwear bomber who attempted to down an airliner over Detroit, Michigan in 2009; two of the four bombers of the July 7, 2005 bombings in London; and Richard Reid, the 2001 shoe bomber.  

Abdul Razak Ali Artan struck as many as 10 pedestrians at Ohio State, and then used a butcher knife to stab some of the pedestrians. The Cincinnati Division of the FBI said it determined the perpetrator acted alone and was not directed by a terrorist group. Also, the perpetrator appeared to have been influenced by extremist ideology, including ISIS propaganda.

The FBI said its federal investigation has ended, and that no further details are expected to be released.  OSU police officer Alan Horuijko, a 2007 graduate of Fairfield High School in Butler County, shot and killed Artan. He was cleared by a grand jury in May and lauded as a hero.

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Another meteor? Reports come in of bright flash across Ohio, Ind. night sky

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 1:21 AM

Photo by Pexels
Photo by Pexels

Another meteor may have lit up the sky late Wednesday night.

Several reports have come into our newsroom of a bright flash that shot across the sky just before midnight. People from Englewood, Marysville and Randolph County, Ind. have said they saw the bright flash, with some saying it was bright blue or blue/green.

>> WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

The American Meteor Society received several reports of a meteor in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Kentucky.

A meteor was spotted in Ohio, Michigan and Canada late Tuesday. 

>> VIDEOS: Meteor spotted in Ohio, Michigan, Canada

Dayton traffic from the WHIO traffic center

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 12:47 AM
Updated: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 12:47 AM

Staff photo
Staff photo

Traffic issues can be reported by calling our newsroom at 937-259-2237 or tweeting @WHIOTraffic .

Traffic conditions are updated every six minutes on AM 1290 and News 95.7 FM.

Major Highway Incidents

  • No incidents to report

Surface Street Incidents

  • No incidents to report

>> RELATED: WHIO App-Winter

>> RELATED: Check for delays or cancellations before heading to the airport

>> RELATED: Track the latest conditions in your neighborhood on our live WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

Ongoing Construction & Other Closures 

Live look at highways on our traffic cameras here.

Latest traffic conditions are also available on our traffic map. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY

  • Keowee Street north of Stanley Avenue, bridge closed until 2019. The official detour is: Keowee Street to Stanley Avenue to I-75 to Wagner Ford Road and back to Dixie. More information is available here.
  • Stewart Street Ramp to US 35 East, RAMP CLOSURE March 28 - Sept 30, 2018. The official detour is: Stewart Street to Edwin C. Moses Boulevard to I-75 north to US 35 west to James H. McGee Blvd. to US 35 east.
  • I-75 north Ramp to US 35 west and east, Lane width restriction until Apr. 1, 2018. One lane will remain open on the ramp with a width of 11 feet.

Good Samaritan Hospital closing: Community angry, devastated, concerned

Published: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 11:21 PM

West Dayton community devastated by closure of Good Samaritan hospital

The closing of Good Samaritan Hospital will be a crippling blow to the west Dayton community and raises several concerns going forward, said three people who represent the hundreds of residents living near the 86-year-old facility. 

"We're behind the eight ball," Minister Daria Dillard Stone, 66 and a member of the Mount Carmel Missionary Baptist Church, 5370 Dayton-Liberty Road. 

"They've made the decision, which means we don't count,” she told News Center 7’s James Buechele on Wednesday evening. “That's just how it is." 

Stone, Mount Carmel Pastor Chad White and Omega Baptist Church Pastor Daryl Ward offered their reactions -- as well as the reactions of the communities they serve -- in the wake of Premier Health's announcement Wednesday morning that Good Samaritan Hospital will be closing by the end of the year.

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Stone, a member at Mount Carmel for 50 years, said her three daughters and four grandchildren were born at the hospital. She was a patient there, as was her grandmother and late husband. Stone said Premier officials should have come to the community and at least given the community a chance to react. 

"If they had come to the community a year or two ago and said, 'we're planning on closing Good Samaritan Hospital and what do you guys think?' At least that would have been a good faith thing if they could have acted like they cared. But they didn't," Stone said. 

The Rev. Daryl Ward, Omega Baptist Church

Pastor White, who also is executive organizer with SCLC Dayton, echoed Stone's sentiment. He, too, has been a patient at Good Samaritan and worries about access to healthcare because that while Miami Valley Hospital is five miles away, the distance can be great if one doesn't have adequate transportation. 

"I don't know the numbers, I don't know the fiscal issues the hospital is facing, but I do know it will be a great void," White said. "There will be a great abyss that will take place once Good Samaritan leaves that part of the city. 

"There are great concerns in the community about jobs, access to adequate healthcare," he said. "And, is this systemic racism? Is it intentional disinvestment in the west Dayton area on the heels of all the other things that west Dayton has come through? 

"Does corporate America have a moral compass or a social conscience to say that 'we need to look at areas that are being impacted above and beyond any other areas' and say, 'do we take some loss or do we take some hit to stay because we have a moral conscience as a corporate citizen in the city of Dayton?' " 

White said the news of the closing "literally took the wind out of my sails." 

Pastor Ward called the news "devastating." 

His edifice is right down the street from the hospital, which is at 2222 Philadelphia Drive in northwest Dayton. 

He said the leaving is not a new concern. "This has been a part of the ongoing devastation that's been going on in this community. I'm angry at the leaders of our community in terms of why can't we think about the best for the community." 

Pastor Ward said he'll be praying that the businesses near the hospital survive, despite the news of Good Samaritan's eventual leaving.

New Carlisle moves ahead with tax request to fund fire/EMS

Published: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 10:01 PM



BILL LACKEY / STAFF
(BILL LACKEY / STAFF)

Council members voted unanimously Wednesday night to move forward with a tax request to support the city’s fire and emergency medical service.

In a special meeting held at 7 p.m. in the Smith Park Shelter House, the council and Chief Steve Trusty discussed the needs of the city's fire department.

>> South Charleston boy dies in possible bathtub drowning

Trusty cited low pay for personnel and rising costs of equipment among the department's challenges. 

If certified, the 3-mill, five-year levy would be be placed on the May 8 ballot. 

>> Wittenberg demolishes part of football stadium

If it’s approved, it would cost the owner of a $100,000 home $105 a year and would not be collected until 2019.