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New pedicab service opens this week in downtown Dayton

Published: Monday, May 15, 2017 @ 10:47 AM

First through Fifth is a pedicab service that you'll see rolling around Downtown Dayton and The Oregon District. Rides are free but tips are welcome. Contributed photo
First through Fifth is a pedicab service that you'll see rolling around Downtown Dayton and The Oregon District. Rides are free but tips are welcome. Contributed photo

First Through Fifth will be providing free pedicab service – with tips encouraged – throughout downtown Dayton starting May 19. In case you were wondering,  pedicab is a small pedal-operated vehicle, serving as a taxi in some places.

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“From the Wright Brothers’ shop to the two new brewery peddling buses, Dayton has a long history with cycling,” said Earl Hatmaker, operator of First through Fifth.

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“With all of the great development going on across downtown too, we wanted to get out there and help connect the dots for people. There’s a lot of stuff that’s closer together than you might think. It’s a chance to park your car and go experience all that the city has to offer.”

First through Fifth is a pedicab service that you'll see rolling around Downtown Dayton and The Oregon District. Rides are free but tips are welcome. Contributed photo

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For National Bike to Work Day, First through Fifth will operate in the morning out of RiverScape MetroPark for their pancake breakfast and then later on in the day out of Yellow Cab for the Yellow Cab Food Truck Rally. The service is free, though tips for the drivers are encouraged.

>> Brunch food truck rallies will be held every month in Dayton

“Summertime is always fun in the city,” Hatmaker said. “We want to be out there peddling people around from everywhere from festivals, to Dragons games, to just a nice weekend of patio hopping.”

>> Your guide to Dayton food trucks
For those interested, First through Fifth free pedicab service begins operations on National Bike to Work Day on May 19. Private bookings, advertising opportunities, and following engagements can be found www.facebook.com/pg/firstthroughfifth

Event Details:- First Through Fifth Free Pedicab Service Opens in Downtown Dayton

- Begin Operations on May 19 for Bike to Work Day and Yellow Cab Food Truck Rally

- RiverScape MetroPark at 237 E. Monument Ave. in Dayton for Bike to Work Day Yellow Cab at 700 E. 4th St. in Dayton for the Yellow Cab Food Truck Rally

Rough winter brings potholes ‘worse than normal’ to Miami Valley

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 7:11 AM

Local officials say potholes are worse this year than the past two winters. A Dayton crew patches a pothole on Gettysburg Ave. MARSHALL GORBY
Local officials say potholes are worse this year than the past two winters. A Dayton crew patches a pothole on Gettysburg Ave. MARSHALL GORBY

The worst winter weather in recent years also has spawned the worst potholes on area roads in some time.

“Some counties are saying the potholes are worse this year,” said Ohio Department of Transportation public information officer Mandi Dillon in a statement.

Fred Stovall, director of Dayton public works, said there are more potholes than the past two winters. Those previous winters were milder and resulted in much fewer potholes, he said.

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“We’ve seen colder temperatures, freezing temperatures, snow and salt in the street. That all gets in the cracks and makes (conditions for potholes) worse,” Stovall said.

Potholes cost American drivers about $3 billion a year in vehicle repairs, or $15 billion over the last five years, a AAA study revealed, according to AAA spokeswoman Kara Hitchens.

The cost to repair a vehicle can vary because of tire size and the extent of the damage. Jason Brown, store manager at AAA Auto and Tire store in Huber Heights, said replacing a tire can cost anywhere from $80 to $250. And replacing an entire wheel can cost more than $200.

“Today alone, I’ve seen five people come in with damage from potholes,” Brown said. “They’re everywhere.”

Riverside City Manager Mark Carpenter said his city has also seen an increase in potholes this winter.

“The potholes are worse than normal, over the top this year,” he said.

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Potholes form when water soaks into the pavement, then freezes and expands as temperatures change, according to ODOT press secretary Matt Bruning.

Bruning said ODOT has spent $726,000 on patching potholes statewide so far this year, most of it in recent days. The vast majority of that number is labor costs.

“This season ODOT crews have spent 21,669 hours— the equivalent of two and a half years— just patching potholes,” Bruning said.

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ODOT already this year has used the second highest amount of salt that it has used in the past 10 years, Bruning said. This is usually an indication of how bad the winter is, Bruning said.

“Kudos to our men and women on the roads. They are definitely earning that money they make,” Bruning said of the ODOT crews patching potholes and clearing snow and ice this season.

Local crews are also working every day to patch potholes. Stovall said that the city has 48 hours or two business days, not including weekends, to patch potholes after they are reported.

“This is certainly filling our time. And we haven’t even gotten to the residential streets yet,” Riverside’s Carpenter said.

Carpenter said the city appreciates citizens calling and alerting the service department to potholes in the area.

Stovall agreed, urging Daytonians to call (937) 333-4800 or use Dayton’s smartphone app to report potholes.

Drivers can report potholes to ODOT via an online form or if the pothole needs immediate attention, by alerting the highway patrol.

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Bruning also stressed that ODOT crews prioritize potholes in high traffic areas, like interstate 75 over residential roads.

“Just like when we’re clearing snow and ice, we try and make sure the main roadways get taken care of first, and I think most folks understand that,” Bruning said.

Employers to recruit at Springfield job fair

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 8:05 AM


            FILE
FILE

Local employers like CareSource and Assurant will be recruiting in Springfield this Friday.

CareSource Life Services is holding a job fair 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday at the Faith United Methodist Church at 102 W. High St.

RELATED: Dayton Children’s plans career fair

Life coaching, job readiness training and resume support will be available.

Some of the employers who will be there include:

Assurant

CareSource

Interim Healthcare

Mama Rosa’s

Ohio State Highway Patrol

RTA

Vocalink

I-Supply

The Greentree Group

Klosterman Bakery

Securitas

Rate of alcohol-related ER visits up nearly 50 percent

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 8:01 AM


            NICK GRAHAM/STAFF
NICK GRAHAM/STAFF

The number of alcohol-related emergency department visits is sharply up over the last decade, driven in part by more women abusing alcohol.

The National Institutes of Health reported that between 2006 and 2014 the number of people annually brought to the emergency room for alcohol-related problems jumped from 3 million to 5 million.

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“These findings are indicative of the detrimental effects that acute and chronic alcohol misuse have on public health, and the significant burden they place on our healthcare system,” stated George F. Koob, director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health.

The rate of all alcohol-related emergency department visits increased 47 percent between 2006 and 2014, which is an average annual increase of 210,000 alcohol-related visits.

Emergency visits stemming from short-term and long-term alcohol abuse both jumped, but mostly for chronic alcohol abuse, which saw a 58 percent increase in ER visits. ER visits for acute alcohol consumption rose by 40 percent.

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The Nationa Health Institute said these increases “far outpaced” changes in the number and rate of emergency department visits for any cause during the years studied via data from the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample, the largest emergency database in the U.S.

The rise in visits has been costly. The data also showed that total annual costs of alcohol-related visits increased from $4.1 billion to $15.3 billion during this time.

Although men account for more alcohol-related emergency department visits than women, the rate of visits increased more among women than men. This increase was mostly because of a larger increase in the rate of chronic alcohol misuse-related visits for women than men, with visits from women up 6.9 percent annually versus visits from men up 4.5 percent.

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Aaron White, who led the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism researchers, said men’s and women’s drinking habits are becoming more similar in the U.S.

“The larger increase in the rate of ED visits among females compared to males provides further evidence of narrowing gender gaps in alcohol use and related harms. This trend is concerning given that females appear to be more susceptible to some of the detrimental health effects of alcohol,” he stated.

Vet still gets 100th birthday party at AF Museum despite Govt shutdown

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 4:33 PM
Updated: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 4:44 PM

Government shutdown threatens 100th birthday party for Springfield veteran

UPDATE @ 4:32 p.m. (Jan. 22)

A government shutdown this weekend made for a shorter-than-planned birthday party for a World War II veteran at the Air Force Museum on Wright Patterson’s base.

On Tuesday, Thomas Eubanks of Springfield turns 100.

His family planned a surprise for him over the weekend at the museum. Eubanks arrived for the noon party, and the family was alerted they only had until 1 p.m., due to the government shutdown, said grandson Kevin Black. 

“The Museum was very accommodating considering what they were up against,” Black said. 

Black said his grandfather, a tail gunner in WWII, was surprised by the 100th birthday party. They were able to get a photo in front of the tail gunner position of the B-17 on display at the Air Force Museum.

World War II Veteran Thomas Eubanks, of Springfield, (seated) with his four children, from left, David Eubanks, Cathy Ferguson, Steve Eubanks and Sandi Black. Contributed

World War II veteran Thomas Eubanks, on right, in front of the tail gunner position of the B-17 on display at the U.S. Air Force Museum. That is the position he flew in in WWII. Eubanks turns 100 on Jan. 23. Contributed

EARLIER REPORT

Kevin Black hadn’t thought about how the possibility of a government shutdown would affect his family.

World War II veteran Thomas Eubanks of Springfield turns 100 on Jan. 23. To celebrate, his grandson, Black, organized a birthday party for him at the Air Force Museum on Saturday.

With the possibility of the government shutting down tonight, the museum may not open, and the outlook of the party is up in the air.

“I don’t like the playing politics on this,” Black said. “They’re just playing games.”

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The possible museum closure hadn’t occurred to Black or his family until this news organization contacted him about the party, which he had asked us to cover.

His family wasn’t the only ones uncertain of what will happen next.

Diana Bachert, spokeswoman for the Air Force Museum, said Friday night in a statement there is currently no order for the museum to shut down.

World War II Veteran Thomas Eubanks, of Springfield, turns 100 on Jan. 23. Contributed

“However, we will follow procedures for an orderly shutdown when and how we are directed to do so,” Bachert said.

If Congress fails to come to an agreement on a continuing resolution (CR), a bill that appropriates money to different federal departments and programs, some federal agencies could come to a standstill.

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Black’s plan is for Congressman Warren Davidson to present Eubanks with a certificate, then Black will present his grandfather with letters from President Donald Trump and Gov. John Kasich.

But if there is no CR passed, Congress plans to stay in Washington and try to come to an agreement, meaning Davidson may have to miss the party.

Black said his grandfather doesn’t know about the planned celebration at the museum.

“He just thinks that a bunch of the grandkids are taking him to the museum,” Black said.

And he probably will continue to keep plans a secret, in case the museum isn’t open.

“(Eubanks) was sick a couple weeks after Christmas, and we didn’t think he was going to be able to go (to the museum). But he wants to go if they don’t shut down,” Black said.

MORE: What if a government shutdown happened? Five things to know

Eubanks is a widower; his wife Suzanne died in 2000. They were married for 59 years.

In WWII he served as tail gunner in the European theatre, an area of heavy fighting across the continent. He flew 13 combat missions from Knettishall Airfield in England.

“Tail gunner was the worst place to be,” said Black, who is retired from the Air Force.

He worked as a building inspector for Springfield for several years.

He lives in Oakwood Village Retirement Home in Springfield. He has four children, nine grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren and four great, great-grandchildren.

“He’s got all his wits about him,” Black said.