Motorcyclist suffers head wound in Kettering crash

Published: Monday, June 19, 2017 @ 1:52 AM

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Thinkstock(Getty Images/VStock RF)

UPDATE @2:50 a.m.

Police said a motorcyclist wasn’t wearing a helmet and suffered a head injury in an early morning crash.

The motorcyclist struck a curb and slid on the bike for about 40 to 50 yards, police said. The motorcyclist was bleeding from a head would when he was transported to the hospital.

His condition is unknown at this time.

FIRST REPORT

Police and medics are responding to a motorcycle crash at the intersection of Stroop Road and Wilmington Pike in Kettering.

>> MORE TRENDING NEWS

The crash was reported around 1:50 a.m. Monday. Initial reports indicate the vehicle that hit the motorcyclist may have fled the area.

This story will be updated as additional information becomes available.

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Ohio EPA orders Dayton to take action on groundwater concerns

Published: Saturday, February 24, 2018 @ 6:30 AM

Dayton demands Wright Patt act on groundwater concerns

The Ohio EPA and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base only learned this month that test results showed the city of Dayton’s firefighter training center on McFadden Avenue was a potential source of groundwater contamination, state and base officials say.

The disclosure comes as the city is trying to pressure Wright-Patterson to act more quickly on preventing contamination to city water supplies.

Dayton has asked the Air Force for nearly $1 million to reimburse costs for environmental testing and studies to track the contamination, which the city believes is caused by firefighting foam contaminants on the base. The city is worried the contamination will impact the Huffman Dam well field, which is about a half mile away from Wright-Patterson.

Base officials did not know until earlier this week that the city has had concerns about contamination from its firefighting training center, base spokeswoman Marie Vanover said.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency says it was also unaware of the contamination levels. The EPA says it only learned at a meeting with the city on Feb. 16 that sampling results in monitoring wells at the Tait’s Hill well field showed high levels of a substance known as perfluoroakyl substance (PFAS), a contaminant found in an old formula of aqueous film-forming foam that was used as a fire-fighting retardant.

PFAS substances are also found in consumer products from clothing to cookware.

The Tait’s Hill well field, which is adjacent to the city’s firefighting training center at 200 McFadden Avenue, is part of the much larger Mad River well field, which supplies water to a broad section of the region.

Both the EPA and the city say the water distributed to customers is safe.

Until the Feb. 16 meeting, the EPA believed Wright-Patterson was the “only known source” of contamination caused from firefighting foam contaminants in the Mad River well field, according to Ohio EPA Director Craig W. Butler.

The EPA this week ordered the city to track and mitigate potential contamination from the firefighting training center and determine the source of a small level of PFAS contamination at the city’s Ottawa treatment plant in the Mad River well field.

RELATED: Dayton urges communities to push Wright-Patt for action on waterPFAS contamination, at certain levels, can cause major health concerns. According to the U.S. EPA, human epidemiology and animal testing studies indicate high-level exposure to the contaminant may lead to testicular and liver cancer; changes in cholesterol; low birth weight in newborns; liver tissue damage; and effects on the immune system and thyroid.

The retardant that produces PFAS was sprayed at both Wright-Patterson and Dayton’s firefighting training center.

The city has been meeting with base officials over water contamination for roughly two years. In a Feb. 7 letter, the city asked local communities to join with it to pressure Wright-Patterson and the Air Force to act more quickly to prevent the potential contamination of Huffman Dam production wells closed last April. Dayton sent a second letter two weeks later notifying city managers in the region about concerns tied to the Dayton firefighting training center. 

Michael Powell, the city’s water department director, said in an email that Dayton will meet all the requirements the EPA demands and attributed the delay in telling the state about sampling results to an “internal miscommunication.”

The city closed drinking water wells at the Tait’s Hill well field next to the training center about two years ago. A May 2017 test for PFAS detected in groundwater monitoring wells at the well field found at least one sample registered 1,260 parts per trillion, according to the city.

RELATED: Dayton: Contaminated sites could pose risk to Mad River well fieldsThe U.S. EPA has set a health advisory threshold level of 70 parts per trillion for lifetime exposure to drinking water.

In a Feb. 21 letter that the EPA’s Butler sent to Dayton, the director wrote the state agency was “disappointed” the city had not shared the information with the state about sampling results at the fire training center before mid-February. The letter does say EPA officials are confident Dayton officials will act to address the contamination.

“It is more critical than ever that Dayton be more forthright with the sampling results and data as this investigation progresses to ensure Dayton’s drinking water is protected,” Butler wrote.

RELATED: 3 things to know about Dayton, Wright-Patt and drinking waterIn his email, Powell said the city shut down the production wells at Tait’s Hill prior to the water sampling because of how close it was to the firefighting training center.

“Two sampling events were subsequently conducted by Division of Environmental Management staff, but the City’s management was not aware they had been done until last Monday,” the email says. “As soon as City management became aware of the data, we notified Ohio EPA and met with them to review the information. We now have a process in place to prevent this internal miscommunication from occurring in the future.”

The closed production wells at Huffman and Tait’s Hill have not yet been sampled, acccording to the city.

RELATED: Dayton demands Wright-Patt act on groundwater concernsWright-Patt spokeswoman Marie Vanover said in an email the base continues to study the extent of contamination and is committed to identify and mitigate any groundwater contamination that resulted from activities on base.

“We will continue to evaluate potential impacts to the drinking water and will work with our local and state partners to develop defensible work plans to do so,” the email says. “The Air Force is committed to protecting human health and the environment and we are working aggressively to ensure our installation and supporting communities have access to safe drinking water. “

RELATED: Wright-Patt treating tainted drinking waterDayton officials say they detected less than 10 parts per trillion in the raw water intake of the Ottawa water treatment facility. The substance has not been detected in treated water, city officials say.

This newspaper provided the first, continuing and most complete coverage of concerns about contaminated groundwater at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and now the city of Dayton, work made possible by your newspaper subscription. Count on us for continuing coverage of this key environmental issue.

The Ohio EPA director has instructed the city of Dayton to take several actions in response to testing results showing high levels of contaminants in monitoring wells monitoring wells at the city’s Tait’s Hill well field. They included:

  • Testing treated water at the Ottawa treatment plant monthly beginning March 31 and “raw,” or untreated, water at least quarterly.
  • Additional testing of groundwater wells near the firefighting training center and notification to the Ohio EPA of any PFAS contamination above the federal threshold of 70 parts per trillion.
  • Installation of more groundwater monitoring wells if needed.
  • Determine if the firefighting training center is the source of contamination at the Ottawa plant.
  • Submit a work plan on short-term actions the city will put in place to prevent training center contamination impacting operating wells in the Mad River.

Dayton confronts two Mad River well field sites that face contamination threats from contaminants in firefighting foam. One is at the city’s fire training facility site off Springfield Street shown here, and the other is Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, city officials say. TY GREENLEES / STAFF(Staff Writer)

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Dry time to start the week

Published: Sunday, February 25, 2018 @ 4:52 AM
Updated: Sunday, February 25, 2018 @ 11:05 AM

Flood advisory until 3:15 p.m. for the following counties:

Clinton, Champaign, Clark, Greene, Montgomery and Warren

Mostly cloudy skies becoming partly cloudy are expected this afternoon. It will be a dry day with highs in the upper 40s. Some spots may get into the lower 50s. It will also be breezy with winds gusting over 25 miles per hour at times.

Quick-Look Forecast:

  • Streams, creeks and rivers may still rise through Sunday.
  • More sunshine to start the week.
  • Rain returns Wednesday and Thursday.

>>WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

TONIGHT: A dry and cool night is expected. Temperatures will drop into the middle 30s.

MONDAY: Mostly sunny skies are expected with highs in the lower to middle 50s.

TUESDAY: We get back into the upper 50s with mostly sunny skies.

WEDNESDAY: The chance for rain returns in the afternoon and evening. Highs will be in the upper 50s.

THURSDAY: Rain showers are expected with highs in the middle 50s.

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High water blocks some roads; troopers urge driver safety

Published: Sunday, February 25, 2018 @ 1:54 AM
Updated: Sunday, February 25, 2018 @ 7:23 AM

Narrows Reserve Under Water

Heavy rains made for tough driving conditions Saturday, but high water remains a concern through the weekend.

Lower lying and more rural roads are at a greater risk of flooding, such as Ohio 68 in Beavercreek, and Ohio 725, which is closed until further notice between Peniwit and Lower Bellbrook roads.

>> Swollen waterways prompt flood watch, warnings along Great Miami R., other spots

“We just want motorists to take a little extra time in planning where they want to go,” Sgt. Rod Murphy of the Ohio State Highway Patrol said.

Anyone planning to head out this morning should be aware of potential flooding that could block your way.

If you see standing water in the roadway, turn around, even if the water appears shallow.

“It’s not worth the risk. It’s better to just safely turn around and find another way,” Murphy said.

Water pushing out of man holes between Xenia Avenue and Pritz Avenue in Dayton Sunday morning.

>> Kasich declares emergency over Ohio flooding

On wet roadways another concern is hydroplaning, when tires lose their grip on the pavement. Motorists in that situation are advised to “just let off the gas, slow down, and try to get to a safe area,” Murphy said.

Late Saturday and early Sunday there were reports of flooding throughout the Miami Valley.

6:42 a.m.: Road was shut down from South and Oxford to Franklin Trenton and Hobart in Franklin

5:23 a.m.: High water reported at Lower Valley Pike in Springfield

3:27 a.m.: High water reported at Wilson Road between Fenner Road and OH-55.

3:05 a.m.: South Valley at US-35 is shut-down due to high water.

1:45 a.m.: April Lane at New Germany Trebien Road and Beavery Valley Road closed.

12:00 a.m.: Upper Bellbrook Road reported having high water.

12:00 a.m.: High water on US-68 and North at Sutton Road caused a vehicle slide off and a police cruiser was damaged.

11:30 p.m.: Hebble Creek was out of its banks in Fairborn in Greene County

11:17 p.m.: A flash flood in Lebanon in Warren County led to multiple road closures throughout the county due to high water, including Morrow-Milgrove Road, Lower Springboro and South Pioneer roads and Corwin Road.

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Flooding and high waters affect roads, homes throughout Miami Valley

Published: Sunday, February 25, 2018 @ 9:04 AM
Updated: Sunday, February 25, 2018 @ 10:17 AM



Marshall Gorby
(Marshall Gorby)

Flooding overnight is still effecting the area with road closures and house flooding due to high waters Sunday.

>> High water blocks some roads; troopers urge driver safety

  • Stewart Road is closed in Sugarcreek Township between Mead Road and Washington Mill.
  • Lower Bellbrook road is closed between Little Miami and State Route 725.
  • Franklin-Trenton Road at the Norfolk railroad crossing is closed.
  • Lower Springboro Road is closed from Pioneer to Fourth Street in Franklin
  • The 1700 block of East Mason Morrow Millgrove Road to OH-22 is closed.
  • Old Kingsmill Road from the 6900 block to the 7400 block is closed
  • Cones Road at the bike trails is closed in Hamilton Township
  • The 200 block of Corwin Avenue is closed.
  • The 5000 block of Middletown Road at the covered bridge is closed.
  • Franklin-Trenton Road is closed from Martz-Pauline Road to the city of Franklin.

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