Levies fail in 3 local districts

Published: Tuesday, August 07, 2012 @ 10:28 PM
Updated: Tuesday, August 07, 2012 @ 10:28 PM

Tuesday’s special election saw five of the eight local issues on the ballot pass, according to the unofficial final results.

The levies that failed were for three local school districts — Xenia, Vandalia-Butler and Tipp City — which had made millions of dollars in cuts this year. Each were asking voters for additional funds.

Xenia

The overwhelming defeat of Xenia Community City Schools’ 1.5 percent earned income tax, which failed 26 percent to 74 percent, will hit the district immediately.

“Voters tonight did not not support the levy, and we will automatically cut all elementary music, all but one elementary counselor, all elementary phys ed for this school year,” said William Spahr, president of the Xenia Board of Education, noting the board already approved these cuts. “We’re desperate. We’ve cut $10 million from the budget already.”

District officials have said a levy in November is likely, although Spahr did not confirm that plan Tuesday.

The district will maintain its 0.5 percent standard income tax, which raises about $3 million per year for the district, and that will continue through 2016.

Vandalia-Butler

Vandalia-Butler City Schools’ 6.99-mill operating and permanent improvement levy also failed, 44 percent to 56 percent.

“Obviously we are disappointed with the results,” said Superintendent Christy Donnelly, who thanked the district’s supporters for their time and commitment. “The failure of this levy did not eliminate the need for operating dollars for our classrooms.”

Donnelly said Vandalia-Butler will be back on the ballot in November.

“November will be our last chance to protect our classrooms and student activities from massive, unprecedented cuts,” she said.

Tipp City

Tipp City Exempted Village Schools saw its five-year, 7.95-mill emergency levy fail Tuesday by a margin of 63 percent to 37 percent.

Superintendent John Kronour said, in the wake of the levy failure, cuts of about $1 million will have to be made for the 2012-13 school year, on top of $1.3 million in cuts made for last school year.

He said the district had planned to be back on the ballot in November if this levy failed, but he was unsure Tuesday night.

“We’re going to meet tomorrow (Wednesday) to discuss it,” Kronour said. “I don’t know that anybody thought it would go down quite like this.”

Northmont

Voters soundly renewed Northmont City Schools’ five-year, 5.9-mill operating levy Tuesday, by a vote of 68 percent to 32 percent.

Treasurer Sandy Harris said the renewal allows Northmont to maintain the $3.6 million in funding it currently receives through this levy.

“Approval of the renewal levy allows the district to meet the day-to-day operating costs and provide the necessary educational tools the district needs to continue an excellent educational program for our students,” Harris said.

Bethel

Bethel Local Schools saw both of its levies, a renewal and a replacement, pass Tuesday.

The 2-mill permanent improvement renewal passed comfortably, 57 percent to 43 percent, and the 7-mill replacement for operations was approved by 52 percent of voters.

These levies combined should raise $1.2 million annually for the district.

City issues

The 3.5-mill levy for Franklin Fire and EMS passed by a vote of 58 percent to 42 percent. This approval will allow EMS services to be moved under the fire department.

In Farmersville, voters approved the renewal of the village’s five-year, 2.5-mill operating levy. The final tally for that levy was a 79 percent to 21 percent.

Contributing writer Nancy Bowman contributed to this report.

Some local schools closing, others making plans for Monday’s solar eclipse

Published: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 @ 8:28 PM
Updated: Thursday, August 17, 2017 @ 5:29 PM

UPDATE @ 2:30 p.m. (Aug. 18)

Springboro Community Schools notified parents Friday of its plans regarding Monday’s solar eclipse.

Several grades normal release time will occur during the peak of the solar eclipse at 2:27 p.m. Due to that, the district has decided to count absences or early dismissals related to the solar eclipse as excused for students at any building.

Those that choose to attend school will be dismissed to their buses or cars at their normal time during the eclipse peak, but will be instructed by teachers to not look directly at the sun without approved American Astrological Society (AAS) standard eclipse glasses:

  • To walk in a straight line outside
  • Look directly ahead or at the ground
  • Any student not following the guidelines will be escorted back in to the school

Some students in the district will get the opportunity to view the solar eclipse outdoors.

Students in 5th grade at Dennis Elementary will be issued AAS standard eclipse glasses to view the event because according to the district,  the solar eclipse aligns with the grade’s science curriculum. Other 5th grade students at Five Points Elementary will have to view a live stream of the eclipse due to a glasses order not being fulfilled.

Students at Springboro Junior High School who return a signed permission slip and supply their own eclipse glasses will also be allowed to view the eclipse outdoors because the eclipse aligns with 7th grade Science standards.

All other grades will be be kept indoors after 1 p.m. and be allowed to watch a live stream of the eclipse in their classrooms.

For more details on Springboro Schools eclipse plans, click here.

UPDATE @ 5:29 p.m. (Aug. 17)

Practice for Bellbrook High School sports teams will be limited to indoor activities from 1 to 4 p.m. Monday due to the eclipse.

Xenia Community Schools will be closed Monday, Aug. 21.

EARLIER REPORT

Many school districts across the region are planning to turn Monday’s Great American Eclipse into a great learning opportunity.

Beavercreek City Schools is among about 20 districts to return to class today.

“Kids are excited, the staff is excited,” Superintendent Paul Otten said.

In addition to regular planning for the upcoming academic year, the district had to consider the Great American Eclipse. The district bought eclipse glasses earlier this summer.

“Every student and staff member in the district will be getting solar glasses,” which Otten said will be handed out Monday to the district’s staff and more than 7,800 students.

Teachers are enthusiastic about an interactive science lesson, the superintendent said.

“They saw it immediately as a learning experience for our kids, and instead of just trying to talk about it in the classroom, we wanted to give them an opportunity to get out and experience it firsthand,” Otten said.

Lena Ellis’ daughter started kindergarten today. “She’s so ready,” said Ellis, who admitted she is as well. “Mommy gets her break.”

She applauds the district for making sure science lessons on the eclipse will be safe.

“I think it’s wonderful they’ll keep their eyes protected,” Ellis said.

However, students must have parental permission to participate in outdoor eclipse activities. Letters will be sent home by the end of the week.

More eclipse-related news is on the News Center 7 website’s  #SkyWitness7 page.

News Center 7 will livestream special eclipse coverage Monday on Facebook and www.whio.com. A special broadcast also will be on AM 1290 and 95.7 WHIO.

CareFlight requested to accidental shooting report in Piqua

Published: Friday, August 18, 2017 @ 2:49 PM

A CareFlight medical helicopter has been requested after a person reported an accidental shooting in Piqua Friday afternoon. 

TRENDING: Puppy hurt in alleged abuse recovering from emergency surgery

Police and medics were dispatched to a home in the 500 block of Boal Avenue around 2:30 p.m. on initial reports of a person who shot themselves in the hand. 

More local news from the Northern Bureau

Medics requested a CareFlight medical helicopter to meet them at a designated landing zone to transport the patient. 

Additional details were not available. 

We’ll update this page as we learn more. 

What you need to know about this local movie theater’s free ticket giveaway

Published: Friday, August 18, 2017 @ 2:01 PM

Time Inc.
Time
Time Inc.(Time)

THE NEON, downtown Dayton’s independent cinema, will be giving away 200 free tickets to high school and college students who wish to see “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power.” 

>> Drive-in movie guide 

This is a follow-up to Al Gore’s Oscar-winning documentary “An Inconvenient Truth” that follows Gore as he continues his tireless fight to train an army of activists and influence international climate policy.

>> Movie times: An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power

Al Gore’s career has had a truly unique trajectory: He went from a successful politician to a failed presidential candidate to an environmental activist to a bona fide Hollywood hero, the latter of which he became with the 2006 release of the blockbuster documentary An Inconvenient Truth. Gore wrote and starred in the powerful film, which won an Oscar for Best Documentary Feature in 2006, and significantly raised awareness of global warming and reinvigorated the environmental movement. Now, 11 years later, Gore is back with the follow-up An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, as a not-so-gentle reminder that we are still destroying the planet, and that is the truth — however inconvenient it may be.(Eric Lee/PARAMOUNT;Jensen Walker/Paramount/Entertainment Weekly)

 

Free tickets are being funded by the the Adler–Zsambok Foundation — an organization that believes that young people must be made aware of current climate issues.

>> Meet Jonathan McNeal, the manager of the Neon Movies

WANT TO GO?

The film is playing now through Thursday, August 24. Showtimes can be found at www.neonmovies.com.

Tickets will be given out on a first-come, first-serve basis to all high school and college students with valid student IDs.  

THE NEON is located at 130 E. Fifth Street in downtown Dayton.

>> 7 cheap, family friendly summer movie programs

Al Gore travels the world examining the effects of climate change in “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth To Power.” Contributed(Tribune News Service)

Is Dayton too downtown focused? Its top boss tackles that question.

Published: Friday, August 18, 2017 @ 8:26 AM

Dayton’s new “downtown living room,” the Levitt Pavilion music venue site, is planned for a green space named after a former city mayor.

The city of Dayton’s top executive spent part of this week’s commission meeting defending the city’s spending on downtown redevelopment, explaining the city’s financial priorities.

Dayton City Manager Shelley Dickstein gave a presentation intended to highlight the economic importance of downtown to the entire city and how the city invests a small fraction of its budget into downtown projects.

“There’s a lot of conversation about the city of Dayton putting too much money into downtown,” she said. “Let me be very clear that about 1 cent out of every dollar — or less than 1 percent of our annual general fund — is strategically invested in downtown economic development efforts.”

Some citizen activists have said the city is neglecting many of its neighborhoods by overly focusing on building up the center part of the city.

RELATED: Clean up deteriorating neighborhoods, residents tell Dayton officials

Downtown’s vitality and redevelopment is crucial to the entire city, because it generates more than half of the income taxes the city collects, which is about $70 million annually, Dickstein said.

Dickstein said that 75 cents of every dollar of income tax collected from downtown workers and businesses goes toward support services in Dayton’s neighborhoods.

“Without the income tax earned from downtown jobs, $53 million annually in services to Dayton neighborhoods would be lost,” she said.

In the last six years, the money the city has spent downtown — about 1 percent of its annual general fund budget, which this year was $164 million — has leveraged $152 million in private investment, Dickstein said.

The greater downtown has about 51,000 employees and 20,000 residents, which increase the appeal and value of other neighborhoods, she said.

RELATED: 4 big questions facing downtown Dayton projects

Downtown has 1,400 housing units and 600 more in the pipeline, and the hot demand for housing is fueling consumer activities and growing jobs and wealth that support the city’s tax base, Dickstein said.

Downtown has 60 restaurants and 30 night clubs that make it the social epicenter of the region, which also drives new investments and activities, she said.

Each resident in Dayton “should be cheering for the investment” and for downtown to be as strong as possible because it drives investment into the neighborhoods, she said.

MORE: Million-dollar club: The most valuable homes in Montgomery County

Dayton City Commissioner Joey Williams said the city often has to leverage its dollars where the developers want to go, and they want to invest downtown.

“While we’ve tried to push them to other certain parts of the city, a lot of developers want to come downtown,” he said. “But we are starting to see more go into other parts of the city, which is a very positive development.”