KITTY NEWS: Fairborn getting its very own cat cafe 

Published: Tuesday, November 07, 2017 @ 6:00 AM
Updated: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 3:46 PM

Fairborn City Manager Rob Anderson recently announced the StreetCats cat cafe. The initiative is design to help address the city's stray and homeless cat issues. Photo: The City of Fairborn.
Photo: The City of Fairborn.
Fairborn City Manager Rob Anderson recently announced the StreetCats cat cafe. The initiative is design to help address the city's stray and homeless cat issues. Photo: The City of Fairborn.(Photo: The City of Fairborn.)

Fairborn will soon have something to purrrr about. 

StreetCats, a volunteer-driven organization, is planning to open a “cat cafe” at 14 N. Third St. in downtown Fairborn.

>> RELATED: 22 reasons to visit Fairborn

The cafe/cat resource center is part of a tactical approach  between the city and several agencies to address the community’s stray and homeless cat population.

It will allow people a chance to play with cats, Fairborn City Manager Rob Anderson said in the recent Facebook Live  message he delivered while covered in purring cats and kittens. 

>> MORE: Dayton’s first ‘catfe’ opening soon — and here are its first tenants  

“It is not only a fun thing, but also a very important thing we are trying to do,” Anderson said in the video. “Fairborn is getting creative.” 

The cat cafe is set to open in January with the hope to expand to a larger space in the future. 

In addition to cats, there will be art classes, yoga and free WiFi, plus coffee and baked goods. 

Anderson said the cat cafe is a way to address the city’s on-going issues with homeless and stray cats in a humane way. 

The organization will help find new homes for displaced house cats and offer services that will allow cats to be dropped off to be neutered and released, said Anderson, a self-proclaimed “cat person.”

“StreetCats aims to become a lightning rod for change, a clearinghouse for information and a creative place to connect interested community members,” an email to this news organization from Anderson said. 

StreetCats will be housed in city-owned property near that city’s kitchen incubator and a co-working space in the former site of Roush's Restaurant.

The initiative has the support of a number of animal groups, Elisabeth Fitzhugh of Blue’s Mews Siamese Cat Rescues told this news organization. 

“I am actually thrilled by what (Anderson) is doing,” she said.

>> RELATED: This new Fairborn store offers horrifying oddities

>> RELATED: Pepsi moving 150 jobs to Fairborn, closing Dayton, Springfield sites

Fairborn City Manager Rob Anderson recently announced the StreetCats cat cafe. The initiative is design to help address the city's stray and homeless cat issues. Photo: The City of Fairborn.(Photo: The City of Fairborn.)

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New record high temperature set at Dayton airport

Published: Tuesday, February 20, 2018 @ 11:51 AM

Windy day in Dayton

A new record high temperature for Feb. 20 was set this morning at Dayton International Airport breaking the previous record set in 2016.

The temperature reached 70 at Dayton International Airport around 11:30 a.m. and could rise into the afternoon.

RELATED: Record-breaking warmth today; widespread showers expected overnight

Storm Center 7 Meteorologists are forecasting temperatures to peak in the low 70s.

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Dayton company’s pilot program getting national attention

Published: Tuesday, February 20, 2018 @ 8:46 AM


            CareSource, led by CEO Pam Morris, will host an official with the U.S. Health and Human Services to learn about a pilot program. TY GREENLEES / STAFF
CareSource, led by CEO Pam Morris, will host an official with the U.S. Health and Human Services to learn about a pilot program. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

A pilot program by CareSource aimed at holistically helping the non-profit insurer’s clients is getting some federal attention.

Steven Wagner, acting assistant secretary at U.S. Health and Human Services, will visit Dayton Wednesday morning to learn more about the CareSource’s Life Services/JobConnect program.

RELATED: CareSource’s chief executive to retire

Wagner will learn about how CareSource, which manages Medicaid plans, has been piloting ways to help clients with other aspects of their lives that could be affecting their well being, from housing to employment to education.

CareSource created a program in 2015 called Life Services, which is a voluntary program to help clients search for jobs and can coordinate support to navigate other issues like food insecurity or a lack of stable housing.

“The long-term goal is to help people become financially, emotionally and socially secure so that they are able to live subsidy-free,” CareSource states.

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Tyra Patterson: Life after two decades in prison

Published: Monday, February 19, 2018 @ 10:59 AM

Tyra Patterson talks about being released from prison after more than two decades.

The one-bedroom apartment Tyra Patterson must return to each night as part of her probation curfew sits above a Jamaican natural foods store on a bustling street in Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine neighborhood.

Family and friends donated furniture, lamps and paintings. A pair of running shoes sits next to the door, waffles from Taste of Belgium are tossed on top of the refrigerator and a journal is placed on a wooden kitchen table.

Little hints of her incarceration show through her habits, when she rolls her clothes into tight, little balls before putting them away in a drawer or when she reaches for a prison-issued bar of soap to wash her face.

Patterson, who grew up in east Dayton, was convicted and sentenced to life in prison at age 19 for the murder and robbery of 15-year-old Michelle Lai on Sept. 20, 1994.

» CONTINUED COVERAGE: Woman convicted of teen slaying in Dayton released on Christmas Day

Now 42, Patterson was paroled on Christmas Day after Lai’s sister — Holly Lai Holbrook — wrote a letter to Ohio Gov. John Kasich in 2016 vouching for her innocence.

Lai Holbrook, who watched her sister get shot that night, told Kasich: “I no longer believe that Tyra participated in the robbery that led to Michelle’s murder. I believe it is wrong for Tyra to stay locked up.”

Various politicians and celebrities — including the documentary filmmaker Ken Burns — got behind Patterson’s innocence claims. Burns posted a Facebook video in 2016 while holding a sign that says “I am Tyra Patterson.”

Just a little more than a month into her new freedom, Patterson — like the thousands of inmates who get paroled from Ohio prisons each year — is transitioning to life on the outside. In 2015, approximately 9,386 inmates were paroled from the prison system and 21,343 were released, according to the latest data from the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation & Correction.

» STAYING WITH THE STORY: Tyra Patterson to speak at Wright State tonight

For many, that freedom will be short-lived. A 2012 study showed an overall three-year recidivism rate for inmates released from Ohio prison was about 30 percent.

Patterson has had some struggles since getting out — Fifth Third Bank, for example, first denied a request to open a bank account because she had only her state-issued ID — but in most respects her story bears little resemblance to the bulk of Ohio’s imprisoned population.

Patterson had prominent people fighting for her release. Most inmates don’t.

In prison, she earned her GED, paralegal certificate, furthered her education through several programs and even learned a little Spanish and Arabic. Before prison, she had a limited ability to read or write after dropping out of school.

And when she left prison she had a good job waiting for her: as a paralegal for the Ohio Justice & Policy Center in Cincinnati, which works to protect the rights of prisoners and those who leave prison.

READ THE FULL STORY HERE

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3 presidents you'll see honored around Dayton

Published: Monday, September 19, 2016 @ 2:53 PM
Updated: Monday, February 19, 2018 @ 10:02 AM

Sculptor Michael Major of Urbana created this bronze sculpture of President Abraham Lincoln as he looked in 1859 when he spoke on the steps of Montgomery County’s Old Court House. The sculpture was unveiled Saturday at Courthouse Square in front of the historic courthouse downtown Dayton. LYNN HULSEY / STAFF
Sculptor Michael Major of Urbana created this bronze sculpture of President Abraham Lincoln as he looked in 1859 when he spoke on the steps of Montgomery County’s Old Court House. The sculpture was unveiled Saturday at Courthouse Square in front of the historic courthouse downtown Dayton. LYNN HULSEY / STAFF
 

An 11-foot-tall Abraham Lincoln made of bronze now looks over Courthouse Square in downtown Dayton.

Here are some other presidents you'll find honored with a statue around Dayton:

 
  

Abraham Lincoln 

Courthouse Square, Dayton

  

 

The monument, created by Urbana artist Mike Major, was commissioned to commemorate Abraham Lincoln’s visit to Dayton on Sept. 17, 1859. That day, Lincoln reportedly stood on a box on the curb facing the steps of the Old Courthouse and spoke to the crowd for close to two hours.

 
   

President William McKinley

 

Cooper Park

 

 

This statue, located in Cooper Park next to the Dayton Metro Library’s main branch, was dedicated to his memory Sept. 17, 1910.

 

McKinley was also the governor of Ohio, an Ohio representative in Congress and a soldier in the Union Army.

 

A plaque on the monument reads, “This monument is a tribute by the citizens of Dayton and the children of its schools.”

  
  

President John F. Kennedy

 

University of Dayton

 

 

“Kennedy’s Eternal Flame” is located outside of the Kennedy Union on the University of Dayton campus.

 

The full-length portrait, which is abstract at the bottom but becomes detailed at the head, is over 8 feet tall.

 
The original sculpture was made of cement and marble by William Joseph Thompson in 1964 and was recast in bronze by John Leon in 1998.
 

>> RELATED: 8 famous statues around Dayton

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