Isaac’s rains spotty, many areas still thirsty

Published: Monday, September 03, 2012 @ 5:01 PM
Updated: Monday, September 03, 2012 @ 5:01 PM

Hurricane Issac did most of its damage in the south and left Ohio still thirsting for water over the weekend.

Sure, it rained, but not much to make a difference.

“What I’m worried about most (this week),” said WHIO TV meteorologist Erica Collura, “is some (car) hydroplaning and low visibility. There will be no flooding.”

Chief meteorologist Jamie Simpson of WHIO said there “might be some decent rain next weekend,” but didn’t think it would amount to more than an inch. He called for “spotty showers” Tuesday afternoon and said it would “not be impossible for isolated heavy rain.”

A downpour that didn’t last long on Saturday night drenched Huber Heights with 3.2 inches of rain and Vandalia with an inch and a half, but winds reached only 27 mph there.

It also rained a little on Monday, “but it’s not going to help the corn at all,” Collura said. “It might help the bean size a little.”

John Stedman, the lead farmer at Allwood Farm in Montgomery County, echoed what Collura said.

“Most of the people I’ve talked too say it’s pretty poor,” Stedman said. “The rain will help the soybean crop a little, but I don’t think it will help the corn. Some fields of corn I’ve seen are real short and some (stalks) don’t even develop ears.”

At Allwood, Stedman usually mows just for hay, and his first mowing this summer yielded nearly 600 bales.

“We only got 40 bales out of the second mowing, then 300 some on the third mowing,” Stedman said. “We’ll get another cutting of hay and we’ll see if this rain has helped. I’ve got some friends in Preble County who didn’t get any rain at all. I don’t know what they’re going to do.”

Tom Hertlein, a farmer in Butler Twp. who also farms land for others, said he was lucky that he was a couple weeks late putting out his soybean crop, which allowed it to grow bigger.

“I put it out about May 20 or so,” Hertlein said. “This rain will do a lot of good. I also had some late corn out, but some guys north of here got a zero yield.”

Hertlein also said he attended an insurance meeting recently and last year $2.5 billion was paid out nationally for crops that didn’t come in. This year, the number is expected to be as much as $10 billion.

“It will be November before everybody finds out how bad it was,” Hertlein said.

Roof reportedly collapses at Greene Count

Published: Sunday, April 23, 2017 @ 1:12 AM

The roof of a Greene County house has reportedly collapsed as fire crews battle a house fire Sunday morning.

Crews were dispatched to the 3800 block of Wilberforce-Clifton Road outside of Clifton around 12:55 a.m. 

The fire was originally reported in a garage shortly before flames were reported coming from the roof of a house. 

Initial reports indicate the roof of the house has collapsed and crews encountered heavy flames upon arrival. 

We will continue to follow this developing story.

Harrison Twp. fires crews battling fully engulfed house fire

Published: Sunday, April 23, 2017 @ 12:33 AM

Harrison Twp. fire crews are battling a fully engulfed house fire Sunday morning. 

Firefighters were sent to the 600 block of Syracuse Avenue around 12:22 a.m. 

Initial reports indicate crews arrived to find a house in the area fully engulfed in flames.

A portion of Syracuse Avenue remains closed as crews work the scene, according to scanner traffic.

We will continue to monitor this developing story and post updates to this page.

2 West Carrollton women killed in Miamisburg crash

Published: Saturday, April 22, 2017 @ 5:22 PM
Updated: Saturday, April 22, 2017 @ 11:10 PM

UPDATE @ 11:10 p.m.

Two West Carrollton women were pronounced dead at the scene of a crash early today in Miamisburg.

It was dark when police say a woman driving lost control on King Richard Parkway and drove up onto the curb and crashed into a tree in the yard of a Merry John Drive home. 

"Can you send an ambulance and police?" a caller tells a 911 dispatcher. "Uh, somebody just ran into our house with their car. The people in the car, I can't tell if they are moving or not." 

On Saturday evening, friends huddled around the crash site to remember 27-year-old Carol Pressell and 23-year-old Courtney Morgan Cole. Friends said the women were coming back home from a night out. 

The house was not damaged, but police said alcohol and speed were believed to be factors. 

Residents say speeding is a common problem in the 25 mph zone, where the road signs also say "Thank you for not speeding." 

"I see (motorists) speeding up and down the street all the time and I'll holler because the kids play up and down on the sidewalks," Aaron Collins said. 

Funeral services are still being planned for the two West Carrollton friends, and the crash also is still under investigation.

FIRST REPORT

Two West Carrollton women were pronounced dead at the scene of a crash early today in Miamisburg.

Crews were called around 2:15 a.m. to the intersection of King Richard Parkway and Merry John Drive.

Officers found a 2009 Ford sedan, occupied by Carol Pressel, 27, and Courtney Morgan Cole, 23, had apparently lost control, left the roadway and struck a tree, according to the Miamisburg Police Department.

According to 911 calls, the car struck a house in the 800 block of Merry John Drive.

Speed and alcohol are suspected to be factors in the crash, which remains under investigation, police said.

HAVE A TIP? Contact the 24-hour line, 937-259-2237 or newsdesk@cmgohio.com

Demonstrators march for science on Earth Day in downtown Dayton

Published: Saturday, April 22, 2017 @ 7:42 PM

Demontrators took to the streets of Dayton today in the name of science.

These marches happened across the world as people defended science on Earth Day.

Courthouse Square in downtown Dayton was packed with 1,200 to 1,500 people of all ages. They chanted "save our planet," "know all the facts" and "science not silence" as they marched. 

"It's kind of upsetting to see how our government has been treating science," said Jessica Spanger, a local organizer. 

Some wanted to promote the fun side of science. 

"People don’t realize how interesting it is," said Ned Rasor, a physicist. 

Others said it's a politically charged event following recent changes in Washington. 

Organizers said the March for Science is bipartisan, and that they hope to get attention from both sides of the aisle. 

"We start influencing our policymakers to make evidence-based decisions rather than making decisions off of opinions or based off of what their lobbyists tell them to do," Spangler said.

HAVE A TIP? Call the 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or newsdesk@cmgohio.com