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Hurricane Scale: What is the difference between a Category 1-5 

Published: Friday, August 25, 2017 @ 10:00 AM
Updated: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 @ 9:35 AM

Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini looks at the criteria for the categories of hurricanes and the damage they can produce.

First, what is a hurricane?A hurricane is a rotating low-pressure weather system.The system is born as an area of disturbed weather usually in the Atlantic Ocean. If the conditions are right, the system organizes thunderstorms to create a sort of heat pump to draw fuel from the warm ocean waters. Tropical systems gain strength by drawing heat from the air and sending it upward to be released through condensation of water vapor in thunderstorms.

As these storms move across the ocean or in and around the Gulf of Mexico, they can grow stronger. 

When a system has sustained winds of 39 mph, it is classified as a tropical depression. When the winds reach 39 mph or higher, the depression becomes a tropical storm and is given a name.
At 74 mph, the system is a hurricane.
WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

What is the Saffir-Simpson scale and what does it have to do with hurricanes?The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale categorizes hurricanes by wind strength.The tropical system is assigned a category depending on its wind speed. Here are the categories, the wind speeds and what those winds will likely do once the system makes landfall.

See more trending stories on WHIO.com

Category 1 – 74 to 95 mph: Very dangerous winds will produce some damage: Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to the roof, shingles, vinyl siding, and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days.

Category 2 – 96 to 110 mph: Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage: Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Many shallowly rooted trees will be snapped or uprooted and block numerous roads. Near-total power loss is expected with outages that could last from several days to weeks.

Category 3 – 111-129 mph: Devastating damage will occur: Well-built framed homes may incur major damage or removal of roof decking and gable ends. Many trees will be snapped or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes. (Category 3 storms and above are considered major hurricanes).

Category 4 – 130-156 mph: Catastrophic damage will occur: Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Category 5 – 157 or higher: Catastrophic damage will occur: A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months. 

Boost Mobile robbed in Miamisburg

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 5:10 PM
Updated: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 5:42 PM

Boost Mobile robbed in Miamisburg

UPDATE @ 5:35 p.m.

According to an employee,  a male came into the Boost Moblie Store and punched a female clerk leaving her unconscious. The suspect then grabbed an IPhone and fled the scene. We will continue to update you with any new details. 

FIRST REPORT

Police are investigating after someone robbed the Boost Mobile store on North Springboro Pike Thursday afternoon.

Miamisburg officers responded to the store at 200 N. Springboro Pike around 3 p.m. on a reported robbery, according to dispatch records.

LOCAL NEWS: Police believe suspects did Facebook Live during standoff

Reports to dispatch indicated an employee may have been assaulted during the incident, according to records.

A Dayton K-9 was called to the scene, however it’s not clear if any arrests have been made.

Police believe suspects did Facebook Live during standoff

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 11:15 AM
Updated: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 11:35 AM

WATCH: Facebook video shows men inside house during SWAT standoff

UPDATE @ 4:22 p.m.:

Dayton police said they believe a Facebook Live video posted during the standoff involved the people they were trying to get to come out of the Elsmere Avenue home.

In the video you see the suspects walking throughout the home and you can hear police banging on the door, asking the suspects to come out.

The names of the suspects have not been released.

UPDATE @ 12:55 p.m.:

Four people have been detained following a SWAT standoff on Elsmere Avenue in Dayton, police said.

The standoff stems from a robbery at an apartment, where a gun was used, officers said.

The girlfriend of the suspect came to the scene and was able to verify the suspect was in the apartment, police said.

UPDATE @ 11:35 a.m. 

Four people have been placed in handcuffs following a SWAT situation at an apartment on Elsmere Avenue in Dayton, according to our crew on the scene. 

RELATED: Facebook live showing what a driver was doing, lands two men in jail

Additional details about the standoff are not available. 

During the standoff, at least one of the people inside the apartment was broadcasting on Facebook Live, according to Dayton police scanner traffic. 

We’ll update this page as we learn more.

Four in custody after standoff on Elsmere Ave.

FIRST REPORT

We’re working to learn more about police activity at an apartment building on Elsmere Avenue in Dayton Thursday morning. 

Multiple Dayton police officers and SWAT members have responded to the 1900 block of Elsmere Avenue and have surrounded the building, according to our crew on the scene. 

Initial reports indicate a man is inside one of the apartments who has an outstanding warrant for his arrest. 

Additional details are not available. We’ll update this page as we learn more.

Rezabek to seek judgeship, opens up hot race for Ohio House seat

Published: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 4:25 PM
Updated: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 4:25 PM

Rezabek seeks judgeship

State Rep. Jeff Rezabek, R-Clayton, announced today that he will not seek re-election and will instead run for Montgomery County Common Pleas Court Juvenile division judge.

His decision will likely lead to one of the hottest Statehouse races in the region as the Ohio 43rd is one of the most evenly divided politically in the Dayton area.

Among those expressing interest are Clayton Councilman Kenny Henning, a Republican, who says he’ll run, and Democrats Ralph Dean Brill of Brookville, who has taken out nominating petitions from the Montgomery County Board of Elections; and Montgomery County Commissioner Dan Foley.

RELATED: Dan Foley won’t run again for Montgomery County commission

Foley did not respond to requests for comment but is interested in running, according to Mark Owens, chairman of the Montgomery County Democratic Party. Foley earlier said that he would not seek re-election to the county commission.

Dan Foley, Montgomery County commissioner, speaks at the Engineers Club in Dayton. FILE(Staff Writer)

Owens said he has also discussed the 43rd House race with other possible candidates but declined to say who they are.

‘We made an impact’

Rezabek said he wants to use his experience as a lawyer and a legislator to bring change to the court.

“We made an impact in the legislature,” he said. “But the real impact is directly on the community and directly with those kids and with those families.”

RELATED: Rezabek bill would give judges more say on trying juveniles as adults

Rezabek, an attorney specializing in juvenile cases, is running for the seat being vacated at the end of the year by Juvenile Judge Nick Kuntz, who cannot run for re-election due to age limitations for judges.

The race for Kuntz’s seat has attracted a lot of attention, with at least five other people taking out nominating petitions.

They include Democrats Julie Bruns of Miamisburg, Greg Scott of Dayton, Steven Wagenfeld of Centerville and Cynthia L. Westwood of Farmersville. Republican C. Ralph Wilcoxson II has also obtained a petition.

Rezabek ran unsuccessfully for the job in 2012. First elected to the Ohio House in 2014, he won a bitter re-election battle in 2016 against David Sparks of Clayton.

RELATED: Race for 43rd House district has turned ugly

Henning said he will make the formal announcement that he is running for the seat at an 11:30 a.m. news conference Friday at the Miami Valley Career Technology Center’s adult center, 6801 Hoke Road, Clayton.

RELATED: Donald Trump is the new president and local residents saw it happen in person

“I’m 100 percent invested in the community and I want to ensure that our 43rd House district has a strong champion to advocate for the district in Columbus.” said Henning, who is a judicial assistant to Montgomery County Common Pleas Judge Erik Blaine.

Kenny Henning, Clayton councilman(Staff Writer)

A Clayton native who has served on the council since 2012, Henning said his campaign will focus on farming and agriculture, the concerns of small business owners and trying to restore Local Government Fund revenue slashed by the legislature. He said he also wants to address the opioid addiction crisis.

The filing deadline for the May 8 primary is Feb. 7.

Owens said the 43rd House district is about evenly divided between Democrats and Republicans and can be won by a Democrat like Foley.

“If he’s willing to get out and roll up his sleeves and work I think he can win it,” Owens said.

The district covers parts of Englewood, Clayton, Trotwood, western Montgomery County and all of Preble County.

RELATED: Ohio could have two redistricting proposals on ballots this year

County commission

Multiple people have pulled petitions to run for Foley’s county commission seat. Democrats include Montgomery County Treasurer Carolyn Rice and Daryl Ward, senior pastor of Omega Baptist Church in Dayton.

RELATED: Candidates seek to replace Foley on Montgomery County commission

Both Rice and Ward have turned in their nominating petitions.

Republicans include former Miami Twp. Trustee Bob Matthews and current Miami Twp. Trustee Doug Barry, both of whom have turned in petitions. Petitions have been obtained but not submitted by Greg Hart and Joshua Smith, both Dayton Republicans.

Other stories by Lynn Hulsey

Kucinich enters governor’s race with call to “reclaim” the state, bring back Democrats who voted for Trump

U.S. Senate candidates Renacci and Brown spar over Trump’s comment about immigrants

Husted wants new voting machines in every county in Ohio

‘Unauthorized’ Dayton food pantry ordered to stop operations

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 2:20 PM

??€˜Unauthorized??€™ Dayton food pantry ordered to stop operations

The city of Dayton has ordered a nonprofit in east Dayton to stop operating what officials say is an unauthorized food pantry that has been the source of some neighborhood complaints.

With God’s Grace, located at 622 Springfield St., has caused disruption in the neighborhood because long lines of people were forming outside its doors and visitors were parking haphazardly, said Dayton City Manager Shelley Dickstein.

Nicole Adkins stands inside With God’s Grace’s warehouse on Springfield Street in east Dayton. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF(Staff Writer)

City staff is working with the nonprofit to go through the process of bringing it into compliance with zoning regulations and have urged the owners to make improvements to provide a place for assembly and prevent lines outside.

MORE: ‘Bad news’ for the city: 7 reactions to Good Samaritan Hospital’s closure

With God’s Grace Executive Director Nicole Adkins said the city’s zoning administrator reviewed her plans last year and gave the OK to operate a limited use food pantry, which has seen longer lines because a devastating fire closed Food for Less, reducing food access in the area.

She said the nonprofit is comprised entirely of volunteers and does not have the money to pay for major changes to the building.

“Nobody gets paid in this organization — it is all volunteer, even myself,” she said. “Doing the upgrades that are needed is not feasible.”

Sky7 Food for Less demolition

RELATED: Demolition of Food for Less store underway following fire

Earlier this month, the city issued a notice to With God’s Grace saying it is violating zoning code because it does not have the required occupancy certificates.

The city’s notice said the nonprofit needs certificates to operate as a warehouse and storage facility and as a food pantry.

City officials say With God’s Grace needs to apply for a change in occupancy and get its plans approved by the Board of Zoning Appeals. Improvements are needed to upgrade the property from a warehouse to a place where people can assemble, officials said.

“Ultimately, we are trying to enhance the safety of the situation and have the property owner in compliance if they choose or desire to run a food pantry along with the warehouse,” said Dickstein.

RELATED: Dayton among the worst cities for food hardship

But Adkins said last summer she shared her organization’s operational plans with Dayton Zoning Administrator Carl Daugherty, who she says gave them his blessing.

In a July e-mail to Adkins, Daugherty said he accepted the principal use of the Springfield Street property as a warehouse or storage facility and a food pantry would be an accessory use, according to the email.

However, Daugherty in the email says that “under no circumstances will persons be lined up outside the building awaiting entry.”

Adkins said at that time they only had a line outside at 10:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. when they opened.

But, she said, the number of families coming to get food surged to about 600, from 400, after Food for Less closed following a massive fire. Food for Less was located just a couple blocks away on the 3100 block of East Third Street.

Adkins said the pantry on Springfield Street is an accessory use because it is opened just once a week, while her organization operates a mobile food pantry multiple days each week.

Adkins said she believed the property was in compliance with zoning regulations because of what the zoning administrator told her.

Upgrading the warehouse to meet the standards of community centers, which pantries are considered, would be cost prohibitive, Adkins said.

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