FOOD DEAL: How to get a $3 burrito from Chipotle on Halloween

Published: Friday, October 20, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

Chipotle restaurant workers fill orders for customers on the day that the company announced it will only use non-GMO ingredients in its food on April 27, 2015 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Chipotle restaurant workers fill orders for customers on the day that the company announced it will only use non-GMO ingredients in its food on April 27, 2015 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Chipotle is known for dishing out food deals to its fans. 

Buy one get one burrito free at Chipotle this summer if you create your own custom mega mix at Chipotle.com. Source: Chipotle Facebook

The latest “Boorito” offer is a $3 burrito, bowl, salad or order of tacos from 3 p.m. to close on Halloween. You can stop by any Chipotle to get your food, but here’s the catch: you’ve got to be in costume.

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Here’s further fine print about the definition of “costume” on Chipotle’s website

“Determination of whether a ‘costume’ qualifies for the offer is at the sole discretion of Chipotle restaurant personnel. Applicable taxes to be added to $3 purchase price. Additional restrictions may apply; void where prohibited.” 

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You can also get a chance to win a year of FREE burritos by texting BOORITO to 888222 by Oct. 31. 

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This local comic shop just expanded to take over 3 storefronts

Published: Thursday, February 22, 2018 @ 6:00 AM

Bell Book and Comic, which has been located at 458 Patterson Road in Patterson Park Plaza for nearly 15 years, recently expanded into a third space.

A local comic book and game store has gotten a much-needed makeover. 

Bell Book and Comic, which has been located at 458 Patterson Road in Patterson Park Plaza for nearly 15 years, recently expanded into a third space. 

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Bell Book and Comic, located at 458 Patterson Road in Dayton, recently expanded to take over a third storefront. PHOTO / Josher Lumpkin(Josher Lumpkin)

The shop had already annexed another storefront two doors down in 2011 and was using that space as a gaming area.  

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Owner Pete Bell explains, “When the tanning salon closed in the middle in 2016, we got it from the landlord. We spent most of '17 renovating it to make it one store.” 

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Bell Book and Comic, located at 458 Patterson Road in Dayton, recently expanded to take over a third storefront. PHOTO / Josher Lumpkin(Josher Lumpkin)

Bell and his team took out part of the wall separating the original storefront and the new space. The result is a welcoming location that has more retail square footage to spread out Bell Book and Comic’s selection of new comics, back issues, and games.

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Bell Book and Comic, located at 458 Patterson Road in Dayton, recently expanded to take over a third storefront. PHOTO / Josher Lumpkin(Josher Lumpkin)

“We wanted there to be more of a distinction between the comic books and toys in one area and then your games and gaming supplies in the other side, close to the gaming annex,” says Bell. “It's a lot more streamlined for customers to shop.“

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The shop’s wide selection of board games will now greet shoppers entering Bell Book and Comic. Due to the limitations of the original shop’s shotgun layout, these games had previously been hidden away in the back room. 

Bell says the new layout is paying off.

“I've sold six different boardgames today,” he told Dayton.com.

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Bell Book and Comic, located at 458 Patterson Road in Dayton, recently expanded to take over a third storefront. PHOTO / Josher Lumpkin(Josher Lumpkin)

Visitors shopping for comics will also enjoy Bell Book and Comic’s new floorplan. The back issue comic books now share the same room as the new comics. Readers missing an issue can quickly grab it while picking up that week’s titles.

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Bell Book and Comic, located at 458 Patterson Road in Dayton, recently expanded to take over a third storefront. PHOTO / Josher Lumpkin(Josher Lumpkin)

Bell Book and Comic also sports a good selection of action figures and toys, table top role-playing books and supplies, and a room full of used science fiction and fantasy novels.

Though his shop may be seeing changes, Bell says it’s the same old comic books that sell the most. 

Walking Dead... Spiderman... Batman…” 

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But he says he can see a new-felt comfort on his customer’s faces. “I've noticed a difference already in the demeanor of people who come in. They go ‘Oh my god, this is what you needed for so long.’ I hear that a lot,” Bell says.

When asked if he wants to take over the entire strip of storefronts in Patterson Park Plaza, Bell doesn’t rule it out.

“I hope to,” he says.

Want to go?

WHAT: Bell Book and Comic

WHERE: 458 Patterson Road, Dayton

INFO: WebsiteFacebook

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School shootings: Hundreds of local students walk out, more planned

Published: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 8:00 PM

Students at the Dayton Regional STEM School walked out of school Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, in memory of the 17 individuals who died during the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Broward, Fla. WILL GARBE / STAFF
Students at the Dayton Regional STEM School walked out of school Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, in memory of the 17 individuals who died during the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Broward, Fla. WILL GARBE / STAFF

Stirred by their peers in Florida who last week survived one of the nation’s most deadly school shootings, students and some faculty at high schools across the Dayton area walked out of class Wednesday to memorialize the dead and harden their legacy.

The walkouts by several hundred students at Dayton Regional STEM School, Miami Valley School and Tippecanoe High School, among others, come amid a small but growing national movement of high school students following the slaughter of 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Broward County, Fla.

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The local walkouts were largely apolitical, focusing on school safety and remembering the dead as opposed to advocating for stricter gun control or mental health resources.

Tipp City Schools Superintendent Gretta Kumpf characterized the walk out of 200 Tippecanoe students as an action “in support of safer schools.”

“We saw this idea online and were talking to a student at the (Florida) high school,” Huthayfa Usman, 17, a senior at the Dayton Regional STEM School in Kettering. “This is a lot more than politics. This was not meant to be a political thing. This was strictly meant to be in support of the victims.”

But school walkouts planned for coming days will no doubt be political, channeling into activism a mix of fear and frustration amid the specter of being the next addition on America’s list of school shooting victims.

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Students at Kettering Fairmont High School are arranging two walkouts in coming weeks, according to students and administrators who are aware of the planning. One, on March 14, will honor the victims in Florida. The other, to be held on April 20, the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School massacre, will focus on pressuring Congress to protect students.

“We’re protesting Congress’ lack of action to protect students in schools,” said Meigan Karolak, a Fairmont sophomore. “I cannot speak for everybody in the movement, but I personally just would like to see the process of owning a gun to be more difficult — more intensive background searches — so that people who are buying these guns … will use these in a way that will not hurt others.”

As the tone and intent of the walkouts shifts from commemorative to political, a question of legal consequence — How do we treat these protests? — now faces school administrators.

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The First Amendment gives students the right to engage in political speech, even at school, said Frank LoMonte, director of the University of Florida Brechner Center for Freedom of Information, in an email. However, LoMonte said the First Amendment does not protect students against disciplinary consequences for the non-speech aspects of student conduct.

“There is no ‘political speech’ exception to the rule against truancy,” said LoMonte. “Many administrators will use discretion not to impose disciplinary consequences when students are engaged in an especially compelling cause, so just because you have the authority doesn’t mean you’re required to use it.”

Punishment for truancy is a concern, but would likely not deter Fairmont students, Karolak said.

“I think when it comes down to it, if we get in trouble, it’s much more important to stand up for something like this than get something like a truancy,” the 15-year-old said.

Fairmont Principal Tyler Alexander said he is working with students and other administrators to plan how the school will handle the walkouts, but cautioned the district has not yet decided on whether students would face consequences.

“Sorry I am unable to answer your question about consequences,” Alexander wrote Karolak in an email. “Right now, I am unsure what those will be, if any. It is imperative we are consistent district wide, thus it will take some time to get everything in place.”

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LoMonte said schools could get in legal trouble for imposing disciplinary consequences on student protesters is if the disciplinary authority is used in a selective way.

“So if the school has a written policy that a student can be excused from school by presenting a written parental note, and the student protester does bring in a parental note, the school has to honor that note on the same terms with any other parental excuse,” LoMonte said. “… if the policy says ‘you may have an excused absence only in the event of personal or family medical issues’ then the school is free to discipline students for walking out, even with a parental note.”

Kettering police patrolled the Dayton Regional STEM School walkout Wednesday at the request of school administrators. In an interview, Alexander told the Dayton Daily News he is concerned Fairmont students could become a soft target for violence if they walk out of school at a publicized date and time. “Students are most safe within our walls, not outside our walls,” he said.

Alexander also expressed concern for students who choose not to participate in a walkout, especially if teachers elect to join.

“If a teacher wants to participate and only 20 out of 25 students in a class want to participate, we can’t leave five students unattended in class,” he said.

Kettering district officials will meet next week to plan ahead of the organized walkouts.

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Is it really a cold? Here’s how to know if you have winter allergies

Published: Thursday, February 22, 2018 @ 9:56 AM

Holding Back a Sneeze Can Be Dangerous

Sniffling, sneezing and a runny nose are tell-tale signs of the common cold, but it could be winter allergies.

Allergy sufferers usually get a break when the weather gets colder, but allergy symptoms could kick up even in the winter months for some people. If you’re symptoms last more than 10 days, it’s probably not a cold. A fever is also a good indicator that it’s the cold or flu, not allergies, according to Flonase.

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When it gets cold and your furnace kicks on, it can send dust and mold spores into the air. They can get into your nose and launch a reaction. Commons allergy triggers include dust mites, mold, pet dander or pet saliva.

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“With a cold, first you feel crummy, then you’re sick and then gradually your symptoms go away,” says Joan Lehach, an integrative medicine physician, told The Washington Post. “Allergies last longer.”

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology suggests sufferers minimize their exposure to indoor allergens by vacuuming frequently, washing bedding in hot waters and removing mold with bleach.

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Local pastor reacts to death of Rev. Billy Graham

Published: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 9:34 AM

Local pastor reacts to death of Rev. Billy Graham

A Springboro pastor called Rev. Billy Graham a “Godly man” and remembered being a part of a crusade in St. Louis.

“I had the privilege of being a part of his crusade in St. Louis in 1999,” said Mark Goins, associate pastor at Newspring Chruch in Springboro. “Always appreciated the fact he lived what he preached.”

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Graham, who long suffered from cancer, pneumonia and other ailments, died at his home in North Carolina at the age of 99, according to the Associated Press.
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Graham preached to millions across the globe and counseled several presidents during his life.

“He didn’t confine his ministry to just local,” Goins said.  “He had a voice to speak into the lives of leaders.”

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