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Flyers-Kings Sums

Published: Friday, October 06, 2017 @ 1:36 AM
Updated: Friday, October 06, 2017 @ 1:34 AM

Second Period_1, Los Angeles, Lewis 1 (Shore, Clifford), 6:16. Penalties_Forbort, LA, (high sticking), 0:48; Giroux, PHI, (slashing), 10:52; Lewis, LA, (hooking), 13:04; Sanheim, PHI, major (high sticking), 18:14.

Third Period_2, Los Angeles, Toffoli 1 (Carter, Pearson), 17:39. Penalties_Doughty, LA, (tripping), 9:58; Lewis, LA, (interference), 12:58; Voracek, PHI, (hooking), 19:34.

Shots on Goal_Philadelphia 10-8-17_35. Los Angeles 9-13-5_27.

Power-play opportunities_Philadelphia 0 of 5; Los Angeles 0 of 5.

Goalies_Philadelphia, Neuvirth 0-1-0 (27 shots-25 saves). Los Angeles, Quick 1-0-0 (35-35).

A_18,230 (18,230). T_2:37.

Referees_Eric Furlatt, Jean Hebert. Linesmen_Kiel Murchison, Vaughan Rody.

Geminid meteor shower peaks this week

Published: Monday, December 11, 2017 @ 7:36 AM

Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini looks at our chance to see the Geminid meteor shower.

Despite the cold, the Geminid meteor shower in mid December is one of the best.

RELATED: Dayton Interactive Radar - WHIO Doppler 7

This year, the Miami Valley won't have cooperating skies BUT the meteors can be visible before and after the peak so keep an eye out for activity. Wednesday night into Thursday morning is when the shower is expected to produce the most meteors. One meteor per hour is possible when sky conditions are good. The moon is in a waning crescent phase so it is thin and won't be visible until the very early morning hours.

RELATED: SkyWitness7

If you want to try your luck this week and hope clouds will be broken enough, dress warmly and give your eyes about 30 minutes to adjust to the darkness. Best time to view is between midnight and 4AM. 

If you want to watch the show without any clouds....check out the LIVE stream from NASA. http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-msfc

Part of Farmersville-West Carrollton Road to close this week

Published: Monday, December 11, 2017 @ 8:04 AM



Nick Blizzard
(Nick Blizzard)

Work being done by the CSX Railroad Co. is expected to close part of Farmersville-West Carrollton Road this week.

The road, which handles about 6,000 vehicles a day, is expected to close at Upper River Road, just west of the Great Miami River. The closure - for work on a railroad tie replacement project - may happen Tuesday, according to the city of West Carrollton.

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Traffic detour route signs will be posted at the site and the project is expected to last three to four days, according to the city.

The work is part of a project that began Nov. 14 in Tipp City and has gradually moved south to Carlisle, where it will end, according to the city.

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Miamisburg Bicentennial committee receives $50,000 for birthday celebration

Published: Monday, December 11, 2017 @ 6:58 AM

The Miamisburg Bicentennial committee has received a $50,000 anonymous donation to help fund next year’s 200th birthday festivities.

The contribution was announced Friday by Miamisburg Mayor Dick Church Jr., who is helping spearhead bicentennial planning efforts.

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Church said the anonymous donation - which represents 20 percent of the group’s goal of raising $250,000 – was made by a private citizen.

The bicentennial group is planning at least one event a month to commemorate the anniversary of the city’s founding, which occurred on Feb. 20, 1818. The main event will be a weeklong celebration scheduled for mid-June with most events planned for the downtown area, organizers said.

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Springfield approves increases to water, sewer bills

Published: Monday, December 11, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

The rate increase, spread over three years, comes as a result of updates to the sewer system mandated by the EPA.

Water and sewer rates in Springfield will increase nearly 40 percent over the next three years to pay for more than $80 million in federally mandated projects designed to cut down on raw sewage overflows into local waterways.

FIRST REPORT: Springfield water, sewer rates may increase 40 percent by 2020

The Springfield City Commission approved increases of 13.7 percent in 2018 and 13 percent in both 2019 and 2020 at last week’s meeting. Springfield’s water rate remains one of the lowest in the region, Springfield City Manager Jim Bodenmiller said.

The projects have been mandated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Springfield Mayor Warren Copeland said last month.

“The federal government is making us spend money and isn’t giving us any money to cover that, so this has to be paid for by the local folks,” he said. “The feds are the ones who decided we had to spend it. It wasn’t our decision. We didn’t have a choice.”

All bills are calculated based on water usage. A typical home using about 3,000 gallons of water per month paid about $32 per month for sewer and water last year. With the hike, that same home will see its rate increase to $36.37 next year, $41.11 in 2019 and $46.46 in 2020.

Springfield is expected to spend more than $250 million over the next 25 years on sewer projects as part of its combined sewer overflow program, designed to keep raw sewage from flowing into local streams and waterways, such as Buck Creek and Mad River.

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Last year the city saw a decrease in its overall water usage due to one major business leaving town and overall conservation efforts at both homes and businesses. The city’s sewer fund is projected to have about $6 million in debt next year to pay for those combined sewer overflow projects, officials said.

The $60 million high-rate treatment clarifier — the single most expensive item ever approved by city commissioners — began construction in 2012 and was completed in 2016. The plant now has the capacity to treat up to 140 million gallons of sewage per day.

The $20 million Erie Express Sewer, which will send sewage from the area of Bechtle Avenue and Ohio 41 straight to the Wastewater Treatment Plant on Dayton Avenue, is currently under construction and is expected to be completed in November of 2018.

Springfield ranked among the 10 lowest cities in the region for water and sewer utility rates this year, according to the annual Oakwood Water and Sewer Rate Survey released in March. Springfield residents pay about $189 every three months for combined water and sewer, based on 22,500 gallons of water used every three months, ranking seventh lowest overall.

Water rates have remained stable for nearly 9 years. With the increase, Springfield’s rate will remain in the bottom-15 municipalities in the 63-community region, officials said.

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By the Numbers

$250 million: Estimated total cost of all projects required to cut down raw sewage overflows into local waterways.

$80 million: Money the city has spent on federally mandated sewer projects since 2012.

$60 million: Cost of the high-rate treatment clarifier at the wastewater treatment plant, the single most expensive item ever approved by city commissioners.

13: Percentage increase of water and sewer rates in each of the next three years.

Staying with the story

The Springfield News-Sun has written extensively on the city’s Combined Sewer Overflow long-term control plan for the past several years, including stories digging into the costs and the amount of sewage released into local waterways.