Dog attack: Family of man killed by pit bull wants answers, action

Published: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 @ 2:31 PM
Updated: Tuesday, May 02, 2017 @ 7:50 PM

UPDATE @ 7:30 p.m. (May 2):  The family of Maurice Brown wants answers and justice from the investigation into the death of the 60-year-old, fatally mauled by a pit bull in the 300 block of Middle Street on April 25.

The funeral for Brown was held at Corinthian Baptist Church in Dayton. A second ceremony was held at the Dayton VA cemetery to honor Brown as an Air Force veteran.

“Any animal that takes a human life and has a known capability to do that is something we can’t come to grips with,” said David Brown, Maurice’s brother. 

He said the family is looking for answers and would like to see tougher rules and regulations on pit bull ownership.

A Dayton police spokesperson said the case is under investigation and there is no new information.

Pit bulls should be “treated as an exotic animal,” David said, because of the threats they pose and Maurice’s death hopefully will start a dialogue to prevent this from happening to someone else.

David said his family is Christian and willing to forgive the responsible parties but that person or family must be held accountable for their actions.

MAURICE BROWN THE ARTIST

He worked as a metallurgist after moving to California. He also was a talented musician, performing alongside the Ohio Players, Slave and other bands.

Brown moved back to Dayton in 1999 and volunteered for various organizations. He was deeply religious and played drums for multiple churches.

“He was always preaching to us about how to live and do right and dream. That was his big one: Dream big,” David Brown said. “He was an artist. He gave up some lucrative opportunities to pursue his dream and that was something I always looked up to.”

Family members said Maurice Brown’s death is especially tragic and hard to cope with because of the way in which he died.

EARLIER REPORT

Maurice Brown, fatally attacked by a pit bull Tuesday, was described by his brother as a “smell the roses type guy.”

David Brown said his brother lived near the scene of the mauling and went for walks nearly every day. He would often collect cans on his walks.

"What we know is from what detective told us, that he was walking down the alley, a dog broke loose and attacked him and they struggled for several minutes before someone called 911 and got help," David Brown said. 

RELATED: 9-1-1 CALL: Dog attack victim pleads ‘Jesus, help me’ before his death

The Montgomery County Coroner’s Office has ruled Maurice’s death an accident with the immediate cause being severe blood loss — clinically referred to as exsanguination due to extensive soft tissue trauma.

Animal Resource Center officials said a week ago that an owner of the pit bull had not been identified. Three additional dogs from the Middle Street home are being housed by ARC. 

OVI checkpoints Memorial Day Weekend in Kettering

Published: Friday, May 26, 2017 @ 8:05 AM
Updated: Friday, May 26, 2017 @ 11:40 PM

Sobriety checkpoints are tonight and Saturday night during Memorial Day Weekend in Kettering. The purpose is to deter and to intercept drivers operating a vehicle while intoxicated. TODD JACKSON / STAFF

Police are cracking down on drinking and driving this Memorial Day Weekend.

Kettering police officers on Friday held two OVI checkpoints and will return Saturday night for sobriety checkpoints to deter and intercept those operating a vehicle while intoxicated.

The moving checkpoint is scheduled from 9 to 11 p.m. in the north lanes in front of 3018 Woodman Drive and 11:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. in the west lanes in front of 2841 E. Dorothy Lane. These locations are where the highest number of OVI crashes happen in the city, police said.

“We’ll be bringing them into the checkpoint and checking for signs of impairment. Anything from slurred speech to the way their eyes are operating,” Kettering police Lt. Lee Sanders said.

Kettering police want drivers to know they’re watching, and will be out in full force this weekend.

“We want to make sure we’re encouraging people not to drink and drive, make sure they make good decisions,” Sanders said.

Woodman Drive had the most OVI crashes in 2016 in the city.

“If you’re feeling the effects of alcohol you’re likely too intoxicated to be driving,” Sanders said.

Memorial Day Weekend is the busiest road travel weekends in the country.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol will nearly double its patrols.

“We want everyone to get from point A to point B safely,” Sgt. Matt Schmenk of the patrol’s Xenia Post said.

Extra patrols, and the patrol’s Click it or Ticket campaign to boost seat belt usage, are part of its effort to prevent deadly crashes.

“That’s the main mission for us,” Schmenk said.

The OVI checkpoints are funded by federal, state and local grants. Police agencies are required by state law to publicize the checkpoints ahead of time.

GOT A TIP? Contact the 24-hour line, 937-259-2237 or newsdesk@coxinc.com

5th tornado confirmed in neighboring Miami Valley county

Published: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 @ 9:53 PM
Updated: Thursday, May 25, 2017 @ 7:22 AM

A fifth tornado touched down Wednesday in Warren, in addition to the two that hit in Clark County, one in Fayette County and one in Miami County.

Tornadoes were confirmed in the following locations:

  • EF-1 confirmed in Park Layne
  • EF-0 confirmed near Medway
  • EF-1 confirmed near Piqua
  • EF-0 confirmed in Fayette County

UPDATE @ 2:52 p.m.:

A fifth tornado is reported to have touched down in the region during Wednesday night’s storm, according to the National Weather Service. 

An EF0 tornado briefly touched down in Warren County, in a field four miles north of Harveysburg, according to the NWS.

UPDATE @ 1:30 p.m. (May 26)

In addition to three tornadoes that hit the Miami Valley on Wednesday, a fourth tornado touched down in neighboring Fayette County, according to the National Weather Service in Wilmington.

The EF-0 tornado touched down in the extreme western portion of Fayette County, based on radar data, video evidence and eyewitness reports, according to the weather service.

The tornado had wind gusts of 50 mph, was 25 yards wide and traveled approximately three miles, according to the weather service. it dissipated about four miles southeast of Jamestown.

The tornado traveled primarily through empty farm fields and did not left little damage, according to the weather service.

EARLIER

The National Weather Service has confirmed a third tornado touched down near Medway in Clark County.

Maximum sustained winds for the tornado were 75 mph and it was said to be on the ground for 500 yards, the weather service said.

The tornado touched down on Lower Valley Pike near Princeton Drive, just southwest of the I-70 and Ohio 235 interchange.

Several manufactured homes sustained roof and siding damage and two large trees fell on and destroyed homes on Cordova Drive at McMahan’s Fairview Terrace Mobile Home Park.

RELATED: Multiple mobile homes damaged by downed trees in Clark County

Several homes on Wellington Avenue had mud splattered on the north or east side of the homes, showing evidence of rotation, the weather service said.

According to the weather service, carports and awnings also were destroyed.

The damage quickly lessened in strength further to the northwest with minimal damage along Jason Drive and no evidence of damage by Amy Dee Lane, NWS said.

UPDATE @ 3:46 p.m.:

A second tornado was confirmed by the National Weather Service approximately five miles southeast of Piqua.

The weather service said the maximum winds for the tornado near Piqua were estimated at 90 mph.

UPDATE @ 3:36 p.m.:

A tornado that caused damage in Park Layne and southeast Miami County had maximum sustained winds of 100 mph and was on the ground for nearly four miles, the National Weather Service said.

Officials said the tornado first touched down in the western side of Park Layne as an EF-1 tornado, where damage occurred to some commercial buildings and trees.

RELATED: Businesses damaged in Park Layne

The maximum width of the tornado was 300 yards.

Additional tree damage and minor roof damage occurred along Bellefontaine Road to the northwest, the weather service said.

Sporadic damage, primarily to trees, was found farther to the northwest, ultimately ending along Ohio 201 north of Studebaker Road.

The damage near Studebaker Road was consistent with wind speeds of an EF-0 tornado, the weather service said.

Officials are expected to release additional details later this afternoon.

An EF-1 tornado is classified with wind speeds between 86 to 110 mph and an EF-0 tornado has wind speeds of 65 to 85 mph.

UPDATE @ 2:56 p.m. 

Bethel Twp. fire department official gave an update on the damage at Sunoco gas station. The hazard has been secured and no fuel was lost. The fuel tank valves have been secured.

Also, there are six families being assisted in this area of Park Layne.

There has been extensive damage to roofs on homes along Osborne Road, according to Bethel Twp. fire. The department was able to use a drone in the daylight to get a clearer picture of the damage. 

Clark County EMA is handling the damage assessment. 

Larry Shaffer, Clark County Combined Health District, said eight of 10 restaurants are back in business after the storms caused closures. 

The Mel-O-Dee restaurant could be closed for up to three weeks due to broken air conditioning units and a structural truss damaged. The Family Dollar that was damaged will also remain closed. 

Tom Hale, Clark County building official, said several businesses remain without power. 

UPDATE @ 10:06 a.m.

The National Weather Service has confirmed an EF-1 tornado hit Park Layne Wednesday night.

The weather service estimated maximum winds for the tornado at 100 mph.

Additional details, including the path length and width on the Park Layne tornado will be released later today, NWS said.

UPDATE @ 9:49 a.m.:

The National Weather Service storm survey teams have arrived in Park Layne and are beginning their surveys of suspected tornado damage in Clark, Greene and Miami counties.

>>PHOTOS:  Storm damageStorms, funnel clouds

The National Weather Service will be out today to survey damage in Greene, Clark and Miami counties to determine the number, strength and exact locations of tornado touchdowns.

Two survey teams will begin today in Park Layne and then those teams will split up, with one going to Miami County and the other going to Greene County.

>>VIDEO: Funnel cloud over Fairborn

In a statement issued early this morning, weather service officials in Wilmington said some of these damage reports, reported by whio.com and News Center 7, include:  

  • Wright-Patterson Air Force Base security forces are checking for damage. “At this time, we do not know if a tornado touched down or not” on the base, spokeswoman Marie Vanover said. WPAFB weather casters issued a tornado warning at 8:33 p.m., which was extended twice more. An “all clear” has since been issued, she said.
  • In Greene County, several trees and power lines were reported down near Dayton Xenia and Trebein roads in the Xenia area.
  • In Miami County, a tornado may be responsible for barn debris, trees and wires in the street the 8000 block of Bellefontaine Road, according to the National Weather Service. The road is closed, according to the Miami County Sheriff’s Dispatch.
  • In Miami County, trees and power lines down in Bethel Twp. at Bellefontaine Road, between U.S. 40 and Palmer Road.
  • In Beavercreek, a tornado may be possible for several trees and power lines reported down near Dayton Xenia and Trebein roads, according to the National Weather Service.
  • In Beavercreek, a tornado may be responsible for several trees down along Dayton Yellow Springs Road near Fairborn. 
  • In Miami County, two homes with structural damage near highway 201 at Studebaker Road.
  • In Miami County, Deweese Road at Peterson, closed because of power lines and trees down.
  • In Montgomery County, trees were reported down in the 8300 block of National Road

It is believed that a tornado or multiple tornadoes were responsible for the damage in certain locations in these 

counties, weather service officials said.  

There may be additional locations that require damage surveys that aren't listed above, weather service officials said. 

“We will be in contact with emergency managers from the affected counties to determine a specific plan for damage surveys, as well as assess the need for additional surveys in other locations,” weather service officials said in the statement.

INITIAL REPORT

Several tornadoes are being reported in Greene County tonight.

Here are some of the reports (all of these reports have to be verified by the National Weather Service):

>>RELATED: Xenia graduation at Nutter Center disrupted

>>VIDEOS: Sirens, wall clouds in Greene

  • One has been reported in Fairborn, reported by Wright-Patterson Air Force Base
  • One has been reported, by weather spotters to the National Weather Service, in southwest Miami County
  • Another in the area of U.S. 35 at the split with the U.S. 35 Business Route near Xenia
  • Near Jeffersonville and the Jackson Twp. line in eastern Greene County

Jason Slyger, of Sabina, said he saw a tornado touch down near Jeffersonville and the Jackson Twp. line about 8:30 p.m. 

"You see the storm, you see a V and all of a sudden you see debris in the air," he said. 

We are hearing no reports of damage of injuries. 

We have been fielding reports of funnel and other threatening clouds. 

We will continue to update this report as warranted. 

Monroe, Middletown EMS honored for efforts with heart attack patients

Published: Friday, May 26, 2017 @ 5:43 PM

National EMS Week was established in 1974 by President Gerald Ford as a way to show appreciation for the women and men who respond when there is an emergency.

Two of Atrium Medical Center’s (AMC) partners - the Middletown and Monroe fire departments - have been honored for their ability to save the lives of potential heart attack victims which is critical to Butler County as the number of people suffering from this particular trauma in the country is staggering.

Middletown has received the AMA’s Mission: Lifeline EMS Silver Award, while Monroe received a Lifeline EMS Bronze Award for their efforts to implement quality improvement measures for the treatment of patients who experience severe heart attacks.

According to the American Heart Association (AMA) about 790,000 people in the US have heart attacks each year. Of those, about 114,000 will die.

The estimated annual incidence of heart attack in the US is 580,000 new attacks and 210,000 recurrent attacks. The Average age at the first heart attack is 65.3 years for males and 71.8 years for females.

Atrium’s Chest Pain Center Coordinator Kim Clout, said the awards bestowed on the local EMS teams recognize each for their efforts to work with the hospital to implement quality improvement measures for the treatment of patients who experience severe heart attacks.

“Both entities work close with Atrium and we really work hand-in-hand to help patients,” she said.

She said Atrium was accredited in November as a full Chest Pain Center from the American College of Cardiology and that has helped train EMS responders on how to reduce time for treatment during the early stages of a heart attack.

Dr. Ralph Talkers, medical director for Atrium’s Emergency Trauma Center and for Middletown EMS, said that the hospital has educated paramedics about using technology to help save lives.

Talkers explained that response time to a heart attack is critical and that is why both Middletown and Monroe departments have ambulances outfitted with EKG equipment to transmit information about the heart’s electrical activity in route.

“We recently had in the hospital a man that came in with a massive heart attack. We knew it was a critical artery we could tell by just looking at the EKG,” Talkers said. “We fortunately got him to the catheterization lab very quickly and he survived. He was actually resuscitated in the field. Symptoms are very critical in saving lives.”

Those symptoms Talkers explained include: nausea, chest pressure heaviness, shortness of breath, arms and jaw aching.

“I think it is very important that patients have to realize that they should not minimize symptoms. I can tell you from personal experience I have had family members at a relatively young age who unfortunately succumbed from heart attack symptoms,” he said. “They didn’t realize that they were having pain that was related to a heart attach and were thinking that their nausea and vomiting was caused by a virus.”

Clout said women need to understand that they may have different symptoms.

“It is critical for women to realize that they don’t always have chest pain. They typically have more of the back pain or severe exhaustion or shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting,”: Clout said. “Their symptoms are a little bit different. But we cannot wait on the symptoms – the general public needs to understand the signs of symptoms of a heart attack and call 911 immediately.”

She added that 85 percent of damage to the heart occurs within the first two hours of a heart attack.

“So if we can open up that vessel very quickly we can decrease their chance of death and maintain their quality of life,” Clout said.

Talker said that the collaboration with local EMS departments, staff and the various trauma and cardiology departments has been a “wonderful process,” that has improved the opportunity to save lives of people suffering from a heart attack.

Former Springboro school employee claims law violated in board dispute

Published: Thursday, May 25, 2017 @ 11:00 AM


            The letter read by Dave Stuckey, at left, the president of the Springboro school board, accused member Lisa Babb, at center, of colluding with a former employee.

A former Springboro school district employee is accusing the school board of violating the law in obtaining an email cited as evidence one of the members “colluded” with her and parents against the board.

“This was a private email illegally obtained by the district. It is not a public record,” Karen DeRosa said in an email on Friday.

DeRosa, the district’s former communications coordinator, also accused the board of violating Ohio public meetings law when they talked to Boardmember Lisa Babb about resigning.

“The Board members met outside of Sunshine Laws and made no efforts to verify the email, which I had not seen until it was distributed at the meeting,” DeRosa added.

On Wednesday, the Springboro school board accused Babb of “colluding” with DeRosa in creation of the letter and petition bearing 130 signatures presented to the board at the meeting that night.

“Lisa… your partner in crime!!!” Babb concluded a May 12 email sent to the account set up by parents presenting the letter and petition.

At the meeting, Board President Dave Stuckey read the statement criticizing Babb as the board, including Babb, sat in anticipation of comments about issues raised in the letter and petition circulated online in the days leading to the meeting.

RELATED: Parents group pressing Springboro school board

Stuckey referred to the email:

“It shows that Lisa Babb has been an active participant, undermining the board, compromising the board and administration integrity. She has abused her powers as a board member and she has made a coordinated effort to collude with former employee Karen DeRosa, the district’s former communication coordinator.”

MORE: Election could end divisive era on Springboro school board

About two hours later, during the board comments portion of the meeting, Babb said she agreed with the letter and petition calling for better communication, but was not “behind” the efforts.

“These are some things I have been bringing up for months,” she said.

Stuckey also said the email was the latest example of behavior by Babb “overstepping” board conduct rules and Ohio ethics law, revealing confidential conversations from executive sessions and forwarding emails with confidential information to her personal email, violating student and parent confidentiality regulations.

“The district has no way to protect the privacy of families once that has occurred,” Stuckey said.

MORE: Conflict shadows Springboro schools success

The board has completed two training sessions related to this issue, Stuckey said.

“Yet, Mrs. Babb has continued to step beyond appropriate boundaries and taken this to a new level,” he added, distracting the board and costing taxpayers money.

SOCIAL MEDIA: Follow Lawrence Budd on Twitter

Babb said she had stopped sending district email to her home account after being advised by Treasurer Terrah Floyd and described other parts of Stuckey’s statement as “very misleading.”

Although Babb said she had been asked to resign before the meeting, “I’m not stepping down from the board.”

In the May 12 email to the parents group account, obtained by this newspaper through a public-records request, Babb responds to on a draft of the letter presented at the meeting.

“I think this is outstanding. Not offensive but strong!” she said.

She asks about turn-out for a gathering at Dorothy Lane Market and pledges her support.

On Thursday, DeRosa acknowledged that she helped set up the email account through which the group was formed and names gathered on the petition.

“My heart really went out to these families,” she said on Thursday, while supporting the call for improved communications.

“I simply helped a group of parents set up the account to be able to post online. I do not even know the names of all of the parents who contributed to the letter or could access the email account,” she added in a email sent Friday.

Also Friday, Terrah Floyd, treasurer for the district, declined to provide other communications related to Stuckey’s claims that the mail was the latest example of Babb’s board misconduct.

“The topic, sensitivity, and legal implications of most of the incidents qualified them for executive session discussion. Therefore, they were discussed there, and I am legally prohibited from sharing information I learned in executive session,” she said via electronic message.

Stuckey issued the board statement before “prearranged” speakers addressed the board during the meeting.

MORE: New superintendent hired in Springboro

A parents group submitted the letter and petition, urging the board and administration to respond to questions raised at past board meetings and be transparent in their actions.

“Unfortunately, when parents have spoken up or asked questions throughout this school year, they often were marginalized. On numerous occasions, school administrators have dismissed parent concerns stating the questions are only coming from ‘a small group of parents.’ In fact, many parents are still waiting for an answer to questions asked weeks and even months ago,” the group said in a letter posted online as a Google Doc.

Two parents complained about problems at Cleacreek Elementary School.

“Please give the fantastic teachers the administrative support they deserve,” parent Heather Bauer said.

But staff and residents also spoke in support of the board and administration.

“Are we perfect, no? Is it better, my god yes,” said Dave Bowman, in reference to the divisive era about four years ago that preceded election of Stuckey and two other new board members.