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Death of 15-month-old boy under investigation

Published: Friday, September 29, 2017 @ 6:41 PM

King Alvin Brown died Dec. 11, 2016, days after he was found unresponsive by a home health worker hired to care for him. Dayton police said this week the case is under investigation and will be presented to the Montgomery County prosecutor in coming weeks. CONTRIBUTED
HANDOUT/SUBMITTED
King Alvin Brown died Dec. 11, 2016, days after he was found unresponsive by a home health worker hired to care for him. Dayton police said this week the case is under investigation and will be presented to the Montgomery County prosecutor in coming weeks. CONTRIBUTED(HANDOUT/SUBMITTED)

The 2016 death of a 15-month-old who died several days after he was found unresponsive while in the care of a home health worker is currently under investigation by Dayton Police, a department spokeswoman confirmed Friday.

Dayton medics and police went to 141 W. Parkwood Dr. at about 5:15 p.m. Dec. 8 following a 911 call made by a health care worker who told police it was her first day caring for the child, according to a police report.

The boy, King Alvin Brown, was breathing with the aid of a tracheotomy tube due to complications from premature birth, his grandfather Jontee Ruffin said.

The child became unresponsive after the health care worker fed Brown and put him in a crib, according to the police incident report.

Brown died after formula blocked his airway causing his heart to stop and leading to irreversible brain damage, according to death records.

According to the police incident report, the health care worker told police at the scene the child had a number of health conditions including a narrowing of the windpipe often from scar tissue, and gastroesophageal reflux, a digestive disorder.

Medics transported the 15-month-old child to Dayton Children’s Hospital where he died Dec. 11 after the family determined to remove the child from life support, Ruffin said.

Dayton police will present the case to the Montgomery County Prosecutor’s Office in coming weeks, Dayton police spokeswoman Cara Zinski-Neace said.

This news organization’s attempts to reach the health care worker and the agency that employed her were unsuccessful in time for publication.

Nickel a pill: Mayor Whaley's prescription painkiller surcharge plan

Published: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 @ 9:48 AM

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley at Wednesday's city commission meeting. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF
HANDOUT
Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley at Wednesday's city commission meeting. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF(HANDOUT)

The subject of the LA Times’ chilling true-crime podcast got his start in Dayton 

Published: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 @ 1:19 PM

John Meehan was kept alive for four days after Terra Newell stabbed him 13 times. Photograph provided by Debra Newell/TNS)
John Meehan was kept alive for four days after Terra Newell stabbed him 13 times. Photograph provided by Debra Newell/TNS)

The man at the center of a popular new crime podcast studied at two Dayton-area universities -- and saw his license to work as a nurse anesthetist suspended after an investigation here. 

>> MORE HISTORIC CRIMES: 5 of Dayton's most shocking murders

John Meehan, the subject of the “Los Angeles Times” acclaimed series “Dirty John,” got his nickname during his short time in University of Dayton’s law school in 1988.

From the Times’ story: 

“Dirty John, classmates called him. Sometimes it was Filthy John Meehan, or just Filthy. But mostly Dirty John.”

Meehan was killed by a woman he attacked with a knife on the roof of an apartment complex parking lot in Newport Beach on Aug. 24 2016, according to the another Times article. 

Debra Newell and John Meehan attend a formal event in Orange County, Calif. John arrives in his faded blue medical scrubs to the formal-dress cancer benefit. (TNS)(Handout/TNS)

The Times series explores Meehan’s life and marriage to Debra Newell, as well as his life of crime.

What Meehan did in Dayton plays a critical part in the story. He married Tonia Sells, a nurse, at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Dayton in 1990. The third episode of the podcast, “Filthy,” deals with Meehan's law school days, his marriage to Sells and an police officer who investigated him here.

>> MORE HISTORIC CRIMES: How this former cop committed one of Dayton's most notorious crimes of passion — and you decide his fate

She helped put him through nursing school at Wright State University, and then the Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia.

He lost his licence to work as a nurse anesthetist after police searched his Hamilton home and found a loaded 9 mm Ruger in his closet and 45 empty containers for six different medications from a Kentucky hospital in his attic, according to a April 1, 2002 article by Dayton Daily News reporter Larry Budd.

Before his arrest, Meehan not only used the hospital medications himself, developing an addiction, authorities said. 

He also gave medications and information about their use to his brother who died in California in September 2000 from an overdose of his own prescription medications, according to records. 

>> MORE HISTORICAL CRIMES: Honeymoon mayhem: Dayton's very own Bonnie and Clyde

John Meehan, right, then a nurse anesthetist accused of stealing drugs from hospitals in four states, appeared with his attorney before Judge Patricia Oney in 2005. Staff photo: Greg Lynch, Journal-News

More from Budd’s article:

Another nurse anesthetist reported to the Ohio nursing board that Meehan once carried a gun into an operating room and exhibited drug-seeking tendencies, according to a case summary prepared by Luken for the Indiana State Board of Nursing. And Meehan was the subject of drug theft investigations in four states, according to police. 

>> MORE HISTORICAL CRIMES: This Dayton landlady helped nab infamous bank robber John Dillinger 

>> MORE: What you need to know about the Queen of Dayton’s Red Light District

John Meehan with his father, William Meehan, in San Jose, Calif., in the early 1960s. (Photo provided by Donna Meehan-Stewart/TNS)(Handout/TNS)

Debra Newell, who had previously been married, started dating John Michael Meehan in 2014. They quickly got married, but she eventually realized he was a con artist. (Rick Loomis/Los Angeles Times/TNS)(Rick Loomis/TNS)

The kitchen knife John Meehan used to attack Terra Newell. (Newport Beach Police Department/TNS)(Handout/TNS)

John Meehan, had thick dark hair and a warm, friendly smile, but he also had a very troubling past. (Photo provided by Debra Newell/TNS)(Handout/TNS)

Dayton likely to ask for ‘Dreamers’ program to continue

Published: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 @ 2:22 PM


            A group of supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program rallied outside of the Rep. Mike Turner’s office and the federal bankruptcy court building. JIM OTTE / STAFF
A group of supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program rallied outside of the Rep. Mike Turner’s office and the federal bankruptcy court building. JIM OTTE / STAFF

The Dayton City Commission on Wednesday will vote on an informal resolution that declares support for continuing a program that shields from deportation people who were brought into the country illegally as children.

There are 800,000 people living in the United States who received protections from deportation under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which President Trump has threatened to repeal.

More than 9,350 people living in Ohio have been approved for DACA, federal data show.

Ohio’s 10th Congressional District, which includes Montgomery and Greene counties, is home to about 200 dreamers, and 700 in total were eligible for the program, whose removal would result in the loss of $11 million in contributions to the local economy, according to a study released Tuesday by the Center for American Progress, a group in favor of keeping the program.

RELATED: Area ‘dreamer’ rallies to support DACA after Trump announcement

DACA’s repeal would reduce the nation’s gross domestic product by $433.4 billion over the next decade, including by $250 million in Ohio alone, the city’s informal resolution states, citing estimates by the Center for American Progress.

The proposed resolution states the city opposes any federal action that rescinds or “degrades” the program, and the city supports giving “Dreamers” permanent protection and a path to permanent legal status through the proposed DREAM Act.

If approved, a copy of the resolution will be sent to U.S. Sens. Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman, and U.S. Rep. Michael Turner, R-Dayton, who represents the 10th District.

911 caller: Wrong-way driver got on I-675 on highway off-ramp

Published: Monday, October 16, 2017 @ 9:55 PM
Updated: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 @ 11:22 AM

DIGITAL 911

Two people were killed and two people were injured in a three-vehicle, wrong-way driver accident on I-675 South in Centerville Monday evening.

  • 2 deceased identified as Melvin Bonie, 69, and Kalip Grimm, 18
  • Police say Bonie was the wrong-way driver
  • A third victim, taken to a hospital, was reported to be alert, fourth victim suffered minor injuries
  • 911 caller said Bonie drove wrong way on southbound off-ramp from I-675 to Far Hills Avenue

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Clark County teen killed in crash remembered at vigil

Centerville police said Tuesday that Melvin Bonie, 69, was driving the wrong way on Interstate 675 South when the crashes occurred.

A 911 caller reported seeing him going the wrong way on the southbound off-ramp from I-675 to Far Hills Avenue.

Bonie glanced off one vehicle and hit a second vehicle head on, Centerville Police Officer John Davis said. 

Kalip Grimm, 18, was in the vehicle Bonie hit head-on. Grimm and Bonnie were killed in the crash, according to the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office.

RELATED: Wrong-way driver detection: Could new system save lives here? 

Around 9:20 p.m. Monday, the first calls about the wrong-way driver began coming into police dispatch, police said. 

>> I-75 fiery crash: What we know about wrong-way driver killed 

The second victim was in one of the southbound vehicles, he said. A third victim taken to a hospital was alert. A fourth victim suffered minor injuries, Davis said.

Police are speaking with that fourth victim for a witness statement. 

It's too early to speculate whether alcohol or drugs played a role in the accident. 

A Montgomery County coroner's investigator was on scene and a Centerville Police Department traffic accident reconstruction team was on scene for most of the night.

Southbound lanes were shut down during the investigation and were reopened around 3 a.m.

I 675 crash Video
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