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Deal lets CareSource ACA plans be used at Kettering Health

Published: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 @ 5:50 PM

CareSource, pictured at its Dayton headquarters, has a contract deal with Kettering Health Network. FILE
CareSource, pictured at its Dayton headquarters, has a contract deal with Kettering Health Network. FILE

CareSource insurance plans sold on the Affordable Care Act marketplace can continue to be used at Kettering Health Network next year after contract deal was struck Wednesday.

CareSource, a Dayton-based insurer, sells individual plans on the ACA marketplace in 60 Ohio counties and the contract means Kettering Health’s hospitals, emergency departments and doctors offices will remain in-network through 2018 for patients with those policies.

LOCAL: Dayton’s CareSource expanding amid uncertain times for Obamacare

“We were negotiating with CareSource, and we’re happy to say those negotiations have come to a fruitful resolution, and we want to assure people who have CareSource marketplace that there will be no interruption of service,” said Elizabeth Long, spokeswoman for Kettering Health Network.

Open enrollment for buying insurance on the Affordable Care Act marketplace ends Dec. 15.

During last year’s open enrollment, about 10,500 people in Montgomery County bought Affordable Care Act plans.

County enrollment 
Number of ACA enrollees by county during last year's open enrollment. 
CountyTotal enrollees
Butler County7,806
Champaign County587
Clark County2,074
Darke County1,005
Greene County3,015
Montgomery County10,486
Miami County2,162
Preble County764
Warren County5,359
Source: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

People in Montgomery County can buy ACA plans for next year through CareSource, Buckeye or Molina.

Premier Health, the other large network of doctors and hospitals in the Dayton region, stated that does not accept the individual CareSource plans that are sold on the Affordable Care Act marketplace.

A spokesman said the health network is not in negotiations with CareSource for its marketplace insurance plans, though it does have a contract for Medicaid plans through CareSource.

CareSource is the only Affordable Care Act insurance available in Miami County where the only hospital is Upper Valley Medical Center, which is Premier Health affiliated and out of network with CareSource’s marketplace insurance.

Local resident Kathy Dye said when she was signing up for CareSource’s marketplace insurance, it was stressful trying to find a doctor before the contract was finalized when she didn’t know if both Miami Valley Hospital and Kettering Medical Center would end up being both out of network.

“I think the next step is probably I’ll stick with CareSource. I still haven’t totally decided on that, but at this point I think that’s the way I’m going to go,” she said, adding that she plans to look for a doctor at Kettering Health.

RELATED: New Medicaid report care gives CareSource 12 out of 15 stars

CareSource said in a statement that its important to shop around for the right plan, even if you already bought a plan last year, because the providers that insurance plans cover may have changed from year to year. CareSource said it has added new provider groups since last year.

It’s been a chaotic year for the ACA marketplaces, facing repeal and replacement efforts and with consumers looking at sharp increases in the sticker prices of plans sold in Ohio.

Affordable Care Act individual insurance plans premiums are 34 percent more on average in Ohio next year. That means in 2018 the average individual premium price will be up to $5,798.

However, while sticker prices are up, the actual cost of premiums might be down for some plans because tax credits can make the final price of health insurance cheaper than the listed price.

CareSource said many consumers will qualify for tax credits that subsidize the cost of premiums and can reduce the rates.

Another meteor? Reports come in of bright flash across Ohio, Ind. night sky

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 1:21 AM

Photo by Pexels
Photo by Pexels

Another meteor may have lit up the sky late Wednesday night.

Several reports have come into our newsroom of a bright flash that shot across the sky just before midnight. People from Englewood, Marysville and Randolph County, Ind. have said they saw the bright flash, with some saying it was bright blue or blue/green.

>> WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

The American Meteor Society received several reports of a meteor in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Kentucky.

A meteor was spotted in Ohio, Michigan and Canada late Tuesday. 

>> VIDEOS: Meteor spotted in Ohio, Michigan, Canada

Dayton traffic from the WHIO traffic center

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 12:47 AM
Updated: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 12:47 AM

Staff photo
Staff photo

Traffic issues can be reported by calling our newsroom at 937-259-2237 or tweeting @WHIOTraffic .

Traffic conditions are updated every six minutes on AM 1290 and News 95.7 FM.

Major Highway Incidents

  • No incidents to report

Surface Street Incidents

  • No incidents to report

>> RELATED: WHIO App-Winter

>> RELATED: Check for delays or cancellations before heading to the airport

>> RELATED: Track the latest conditions in your neighborhood on our live WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

Ongoing Construction & Other Closures 

Live look at highways on our traffic cameras here.

Latest traffic conditions are also available on our traffic map. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY

  • Keowee Street north of Stanley Avenue, bridge closed until 2019. The official detour is: Keowee Street to Stanley Avenue to I-75 to Wagner Ford Road and back to Dixie. More information is available here.
  • Stewart Street Ramp to US 35 East, RAMP CLOSURE March 28 - Sept 30, 2018. The official detour is: Stewart Street to Edwin C. Moses Boulevard to I-75 north to US 35 west to James H. McGee Blvd. to US 35 east.
  • I-75 north Ramp to US 35 west and east, Lane width restriction until Apr. 1, 2018. One lane will remain open on the ramp with a width of 11 feet.

Good Samaritan Hospital closing: Community angry, devastated, concerned

Published: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 11:21 PM

West Dayton community devastated by closure of Good Samaritan hospital

The closing of Good Samaritan Hospital will be a crippling blow to the west Dayton community and raises several concerns going forward, said three people who represent the hundreds of residents living near the 86-year-old facility. 

"We're behind the eight ball," Minister Daria Dillard Stone, 66 and a member of the Mount Carmel Missionary Baptist Church, 5370 Dayton-Liberty Road. 

"They've made the decision, which means we don't count,” she told News Center 7’s James Buechele on Wednesday evening. “That's just how it is." 

Stone, Mount Carmel Pastor Chad White and Omega Baptist Church Pastor Daryl Ward offered their reactions -- as well as the reactions of the communities they serve -- in the wake of Premier Health's announcement Wednesday morning that Good Samaritan Hospital will be closing by the end of the year.

RELATED

Premier Health to close Good Samaritan Hospital

Good Samaritan Hospital closing: What we know

Official: Job outlook for Good Samaritan Hospital workers

Stone, a member at Mount Carmel for 50 years, said her three daughters and four grandchildren were born at the hospital. She was a patient there, as was her grandmother and late husband. Stone said Premier officials should have come to the community and at least given the community a chance to react. 

"If they had come to the community a year or two ago and said, 'we're planning on closing Good Samaritan Hospital and what do you guys think?' At least that would have been a good faith thing if they could have acted like they cared. But they didn't," Stone said. 

The Rev. Daryl Ward, Omega Baptist Church

Pastor White, who also is executive organizer with SCLC Dayton, echoed Stone's sentiment. He, too, has been a patient at Good Samaritan and worries about access to healthcare because that while Miami Valley Hospital is five miles away, the distance can be great if one doesn't have adequate transportation. 

"I don't know the numbers, I don't know the fiscal issues the hospital is facing, but I do know it will be a great void," White said. "There will be a great abyss that will take place once Good Samaritan leaves that part of the city. 

"There are great concerns in the community about jobs, access to adequate healthcare," he said. "And, is this systemic racism? Is it intentional disinvestment in the west Dayton area on the heels of all the other things that west Dayton has come through? 

"Does corporate America have a moral compass or a social conscience to say that 'we need to look at areas that are being impacted above and beyond any other areas' and say, 'do we take some loss or do we take some hit to stay because we have a moral conscience as a corporate citizen in the city of Dayton?' " 

White said the news of the closing "literally took the wind out of my sails." 

Pastor Ward called the news "devastating." 

His edifice is right down the street from the hospital, which is at 2222 Philadelphia Drive in northwest Dayton. 

He said the leaving is not a new concern. "This has been a part of the ongoing devastation that's been going on in this community. I'm angry at the leaders of our community in terms of why can't we think about the best for the community." 

Pastor Ward said he'll be praying that the businesses near the hospital survive, despite the news of Good Samaritan's eventual leaving.

New Carlisle moves ahead with tax request to fund fire/EMS

Published: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 10:01 PM



BILL LACKEY / STAFF
(BILL LACKEY / STAFF)

Council members voted unanimously Wednesday night to move forward with a tax request to support the city’s fire and emergency medical service.

In a special meeting held at 7 p.m. in the Smith Park Shelter House, the council and Chief Steve Trusty discussed the needs of the city's fire department.

>> South Charleston boy dies in possible bathtub drowning

Trusty cited low pay for personnel and rising costs of equipment among the department's challenges. 

If certified, the 3-mill, five-year levy would be be placed on the May 8 ballot. 

>> Wittenberg demolishes part of football stadium

If it’s approved, it would cost the owner of a $100,000 home $105 a year and would not be collected until 2019.