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Deadly Dayton dog attack: Coroner IDs man killed by pit bull

Published: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 @ 5:24 AM
Updated: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 @ 3:32 PM

SUMMARY

  • Police were dispatched to Middle Street Tuesday morning on report of man yelling for help, and dogs barking
  • Police report the dog is an adult pit bull who broke loose from a chain
  • Officials shot and killed the dog 
  • Coroner confirms identity of 60-year-old male dog attack victim 

RELATED: Dayton dog attack victim pleads ‘Jesus, help me’ before his death

DAYTON — The man killed after being mauled by a pit bull Tuesday morning has been identified as 60-year-old Maurice Brown, of Central Avenue in Dayton, according to the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office.

Dayton Police Lt. Andrew Booher said no one has come forward as caretaker to the suspect dog and three other dogs that were removed from the 300 block of Middle Street.

Police are working with the Animal Resource Center to find out what dogs in that area might have licenses, and identify problem animals reported by neighbors.

Booher said the property owner is in a nursing home. Its unknown if the property owner is the dog owner, however there's evidence people were feeding and caring for four dogs at the residence.

PHOTOS: Scenes from fatal dog attack site in Dayton

Police said Brown was walking in the area, around 5:15 a.m., when he was attacked by a vicious adult male pit bull. Authorities quarantined the pit bull that attacked the victim before shooting it.Officers located and removed three pit bulls from the property. Police say it appears the dogs did not have food or water and may have been hungry.     

The dog that attacked Brown attacked a rodent before breaking loose from its chain. Police responded to Middle Street Tuesday morning after a neighbor called 9-1-1 and reported he heard someone yelling for help.  

RELATED: A child was attacked by a dog at the same address in 2011

The caller told the 9-1-1 dispatcher he heard a man outside yelling for help and crying for about three to five minutes. 

"Near Riverview Avenue there's a man outside yelling 'Jesus help me. Help me,'" the caller said to the dispatcher. "Sounds like he's in pain. He's yelling at the top of his lungs. All the dogs are barking." 

Potential charges in a fatal dog attack could range from control of animal to felony offenses, but Booher said the prosecutor’s office will be consulted. 

"The injuries were pretty severe from the dog itself," Booher said, adding the dog was still attacking the man when officers arrived on scene. "This isn't something that ordinarily happens."

On Tuesday, Dayton police waited on a search warrant to enter a house in the 300 block of Middle Street. 

Three dogs were removed from the house after a dog fatally mauled a man walking in an alley behind the house.

DAYTON FATAL DOG ATTACKS

Klonda Richey was mauled by dogs and killed on East Bruce Street on Feb. 7, 2014 when 

Kimiko Hardy convicted on manslaughter and other felony charges after her dog fatally mauled her 7-month-old stepgrandson in 2014.

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Two men arrested following dispute over car repossession

Published: Monday, May 22, 2017 @ 9:24 PM

A dispute between an man attempting to "repo" a vehicle and the vehicle’s owner involved an argument, a threat, and shots fired at a residence in the area of State Route 571 and Rangeline Road in Miami County. 

Detectives later executed a search warrant on the home where the owner, 34-year-old, Matt Naff, was arrested and jailed.

The man involved in the attempted repossession of the vehicle, 54-year-old Eric Brown of West Milton, was arrested and booked into the Miami County Jail in Troy.

Both are charged with one count each of felonious assault, according to a police report.

Deputies recovered two handguns, ammunition and spent bullet casings at the scene, according to the report.

No one was shot during the dispute, according to deputies.

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Cincinnati State to tap beer brewing degree

Published: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 @ 10:01 AM


            John Loftis holds up a glass of Mother Stewart’s beer to the light in their brew house in Springfield. BILL LACKEY/STAFF

Cincinnati State will announce the launch of the region’s first degree in brewing science today.

Cincinnati State and leaders of the local craft beer and brewing industry will make the announcement at 10:30 a.m. today about the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Brewing degree.

RELATED: New microbrewery, taproom coming to Butler County

Employers in the fast-growing craft beer industry say the new degree will help close the skill gap and accelerate Cincinnati’s growing reputation as a “bastion of brewing.”

It is the first two-year Brewing Science degree program in Ohio, Kentucky or Indiana and was designed with extensive input brewing industry leaders, university leaders said.

RELATED: New Middletown brewery aims to bridge beer towns of Cincinnati, Dayton

Those expected at the announcement include: Monica Posey, president of Cincinnati State, Chef Alan Neace, Associate Dean of Midwest Culinary Institute, Carla Gesell-Streeter, program chair for Brewing Science program, brewing student Ryan Osner, a veteran and employee at Rhinegeist, area brewing industry leaders, area chambers of commerce and state and local officials.

Blown tire sends truck hauling trailer off I-675 South

Published: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 @ 9:54 AM



Jarod Thrush

No one was seriously injured when a pickup truck hauling a trailer full of lawnmowers crashed on I-675 South this morning.

Southbound traffic was slowed at 8:30 a.m. around the Yankee Street exit as Washington Twp. crews responded to the scene.

Officials tell us the full-size pickup truck blew a tire and the driver lost control, careening off the right side of the highway where the trailer overturned.

Crews cut the top off of the trailer to gain access to the lawnmowing cargo. Firefighters worked to contain the gasoline that was leaking from the equipment.

One person suffered a minor injury and was treated at the scene, according to officials at the scene. 

Local firefighters applaud signing of cancer bill into law

Published: Thursday, January 05, 2017 @ 2:59 PM


            Ohio Gov. John Kasich signed Senate Bill 27, now known as the “Michael Louis Palumbo Jr. Act,” into law Jan. 4. It allows firefighters who have cancer to file claims with the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation. Pictured are firefighters from various Butler County jurisdictions during a training exercise last spring. STAFF FILE/2016

A bill that would help firefighters diagnosed with certain types of cancer as a result of their job has been signed into law.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich signed Senate Bill 27, now known as the “Michael Louis Palumbo Jr. Act,” into law Wednesday. It allows firefighters who have cancer to file claims with the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation.

More than 30 states already have similar laws.

“An untold amount of time and hard work has gone into making this law a reality,” Tony Harris, president of the Hamilton Local IAFF 20, told the Journal-News. “It is appropriate that Gov. Kasich is giving this law the attention it deserves by signing it surrounded by firefighters that it will help protect.”

Research has shown fire personnel are much more likely than the general population to get some forms of cancer. A recent study by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health found that about 68 percent of firefighters get cancer, compared to 22 percent of the general public, regardless of race or gender.

In the course of their work, firefighters are exposed to many cancer-causing materials, such as asbestos, according to Doug Stern of the Ohio Professional Fire Fighters.

“…We’re exposed to a toxic soup of chemicals and combustion byproducts linked to cancer,” Stern previously told the Journal-News. “The reality is many of our friends and colleagues are dying with their boots off, and contracting occupationally related cancers far too young of an age with more aggressive types of cancers.”

The law is named after Palumbo, a Cleveland-area fire captain who is battling an aggressive form of brain cancer. He was at the bill signing along with his family.

Harris said the law is the “most important piece of legislation to pass through the Statehouse in 30 years for firefighters.”

While some lawmakers expressed concerns about the strain the measure could put on municipalities’ budgets, it gained approval in both the House and Senate.

Stern said the law will only apply to firefighters diagnosed with certain types of cancer, such as lung, prostate or brain cancers and leukemia.

Firefighters who smoke, are over the age of 75, or who served less than three years would also be exempt from additional benefits under the law, according to Stern.