CLOSINGS AND DELAYS:

Alter High School, Ascension School, BSF Dayton Day Women, Fairborn City Schools, Faith Preschool, Green-Oak Preschool, Huber Heights Schools, Jefferson Township Local Schools, Kettering City Schools, L&M Products Inc., Liberty High School, Maple Avenue Church of God, Marshall High School, Miami East Local Schools, Mont. Co. E.S.C. Learning Centers, Moraine Seniors Citizens Club, Northridge Schools, Pathway School of Discovery, Ron West Barber College, Senior Center of Sidney/Shelby Co., Sidney City Schools, Sidney Holy Angels, Southeastern Local Schools, St. Albert the Great School, St. Charles Elementary, St. Peter Catholic School-Huber Heights, Wilmington City Schools,

Power fully restored at Atlanta airport, city says

Published: Sunday, December 17, 2017 @ 3:05 PM
Updated: Sunday, December 17, 2017 @ 7:50 PM

Dayton travelers affected by power outage at Atlanta's airpoprt

UPDATE @ 12 a.m.:

Atlanta city officials said power has been fully restored at the airport.

UPDATE @ 11:42 p.m.:

Power has been restored to some of the Atlanta airport, including concourses A, B, F and T, according to city officials.

UPDATE @ 10:51 p.m.:

Delta has announced plans to cancel approximately 300 flights Monday due to Sunday’s power outage at the Atlanta airport, the company said in a statement.

The airline is urging customers to check Delta.com or the Fly Delta mobile app for the status of their flight.

The company said the cancellations are designed, in part, to allow the operation to best reset Monday.

Photos: Power outage paralyzes Atlanta airport

UPDATE @ 7:50 p.m.

About six hours after a power failure began at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, officials said a fire likely caused the outage.

Mayor Kasim Reed has tweeted: Power at Concourse F is back on. If you are in another concourse, please remain there. We have an additional update on when full power will be restored from.” The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

But while a fire caused extensive damage to an underground electrical facility, the cause is still not confirmed, officials with Georgia Power told The AJC.

UPDATE @ 6:53 p.m.

Georgia Power said it expects to have electricity restored by midnight to the world’s busiest airport, Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta.

It’s not clear how flyers will be able to get to their destinations on Monday.

UPDATE @ 6:25 p.m.

Five hours after a power outage began at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, the scene was the same: a swirling mass of people in an aimless pattern trying to get cellphone signals in a darkening airport.

All flights were canceled and baggage was being held in a secure area for future pickup at the airport, Rick Crotts, an Atlanta Journal-Constitution editor who was stuck on a plane for hours, said.

Photos: Power outage paralyzes Atlanta airport

Delta Air Lines, which has its headquarters at the airport, said more than 450 flights were canceled, which affected flyers in Dayton, Cincinnati and Columbus.

Atlanta Airport Outage

Canceled flights at the Dayton International Airport included Delta Air Lines Flight 2337, supposed to leave at 6:33 p.m. and Delta Flight 1161, scheduled to depart at 2:18 p.m. for Atlanta, as well as Delta Flight 2337 from Atlanta to Dayton, scheduled to arrive at 5:53 p.m. according to the airport’s Flight Tracker.

At the John Glenn Columbus International Airport, three flights headed to Atlanta were canceled, including Delta Flights 758 and Southwest Flight 2363, both leaving at 5:15 p.m.; and Delta Flight 1646 that was scheduled to leave at 7:25 p.m. Delta Flight 1645 from Atlanta, scheduled to arrive in Columbus at 8:36 p.m., was canceled.

Three Delta flights to or from Atlanta were canceled at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport.

Southwest Airlines reported about 70 Atlanta departures were canceled, the Associated Press reported.

In Georgia, five hours after the airport power outage began, Atlanta police arrived to help.

“We are aware of the situation and are assisting with crowd control and helping to manage traffic around the airport,” police spokeswoman Officer Lisa Bender told the AJC.

In Atlanta, passengers sat stranded in parked planes on the tarmac as officials offered few updates and no insight into the cause of the outage.

UPDATE @ 4:15 p.m.

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport announced the FAA has ordered all flights grounded that were headed to Atlanta. Some flights are being diverted.

ATL is directing passengers to follow their airlines’ social media channels for flight information.

EARLIER

Delta flights at the Dayton International Airport to and from Atlanta are delayed because of a power outage at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.

The airport is holding all inbound flights until at least 4 p.m. and departure delays are averaging nearly an hour and a half, according to FlightAware.

>> President Trump declares today ‘Wright Brothers Day’

Two Dayton flights to Atlanta are delayed and one inbound flight from Atlanta is delayed. Click here to track flights. 

There also are three flights to Atlanta that are delayed at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport.

In Columbus, four arrivals from Atlanta are delayed. Also, three departures to Atlanta are delayed and one is canceled.

Flyers should check the official FAA website for air traffic control updates.

Rick Crotts, an Atlanta Journal-Constitution editor aboard a flight that had arrived at the airport around the time of the power failure, is among passengers still waiting aboard their flights to reach a gate. 

Crotts' flight has been waiting for more than an hour, and the pilot reported that several planes are positioned before them for passengers to disembark. 

Crotts said his Delta Air Lines pilot told passengers a construction crew cut a power line, causing the outage, but an airport spokesman, Andy Gobeil, said officials still weren’t sure. 

>> SpaceX capsule back at space station with pre-Christmas haul

“We have not determined what caused it,” Gobeil said. Atlanta fire officials and others are “trying to determine how long it will take to get everything up and running.” 

Georgia Power officials confirmed they are aware of the problem, but didn’t have additional information. 

Flyers have reported chaotic conditions at the airport since the power failure.

Inside the airport at Concourse D, Olivia Dorfman told The AJC by phone she was about to board a flight home to Indiana when the power went out. 

“Maybe 10 minutes later a buzzer went off in the background — that has been going on for over an hour and every so often bright lights flash in the ceiling,” Dorfman said. 

Near the D9A gate, she said smoke filled the area and at different times airport workers tried to herd passengers toward the smoky area and away from it. 

“This has been very bizarre,” she said. “No one seems to know what they’re doing.”

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com.

Dayton apartment residents able to stay after judge issues order

Published: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 @ 1:15 PM

Judge tours building to make sure residents have heat

UPDATE @ 3:02 p.m.:

Judge Richard Skelton has issued a temporary restraining order that blocks the city of Dayton’s emergency vacate order for the Newcom building.  

Skelton said the building owner must purchase infrared heaters today for the remaining 18 tenants in the building.  He ordered that the building be available for inspection to the court.

Skelton said he will review the matter every two days and planned to inspect the building tonight.  “I will be watching this very closely,” Skelton said.

UPDATE @ 2:07 p.m.:

Judge Richard Skelton said he is willing to work with the building owner to avoid kicking residents out of their homes.

But he said he wants to know how quickly owner Howard Heck can acquire infrared heaters for the 18 residents who remain in the building. 

WATCH: Residents live in apartment building with no heat

RELATED: Dayton issues vacate order for downtown apartment building

About seven residents have moved out owing to the vacate order. 

Heck’s attorney at first said his client would order the heaters on Amazon, but Skelton said he wanted a quick and definite plan for obtaining the heaters. 

Skelton took a short recess in court to allow Heck time to try to figure out how he could get the heaters quickly. 

INITIAL REPORT:

The roughly 50 residents of a downtown Dayton apartment building who were ordered to vacate by Tuesday if the heating system was not repaired were awaiting the results of an emergency hearing this afternoon

Last week, city of Dayton housing inspection officials issued an emergency vacate order to residents at the Newcom Building, located at 255 N. Main St.

The building’s boiler was shut off because it was releasing dangerous levels of carbon monoxide, which can cause deadly poisoning.

Dayton crews discovered high levels of carbon monoxide in the boiler room after responding to a medic call at the Newcom building.

RELATED: Dayton issues vacate order for downtown apartment building

The city told the building’s ownership it had to repair or replace the boiler by Tuesday or the building would be boarded up and all residents would be required to leave.

The building is not safe to live in because it does not have a functioning heating system, officials said, and the especially cold weather poses a threat to residents.

A small number of residents had moved out by Tuesday late morning, but most do not have any place to go and moving itself would be very difficult since some residents are elderly or disabled, said Bradley Brumit, who lives in the building.

Fraze FanFare to reopen after pipe burst

Published: Saturday, January 06, 2018 @ 11:45 PM

Fraze FanFare to reopen after pipe burst

UPDATE @ 12:21 p.m. (Jan. 16):

Fraze FanFare at Town & Country Shopping Center will reopen Saturday at 10 a.m. after a burst pipe temporarily closed the location, officials announced Tuesday.

The ticket office at the Fraze Pavilion venue in Lincoln Park remains open this week from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Friday.

INITIAL REPORT:

Fraze FanFare inside the Town & Country Shopping Center will remain closed for the rest of this weekend after a pipe burst.

For this weekend only, tickets purchased through Etix.com or by phone at 800-514-3849 will incur no additional service charges, Fraze Pavilion posted on social media.

This weekend, tickets for acts such as Roots & Boots, Sammy Kershaw and Aaron Tippin went on sale, and can be bought without extra fees.

>> Comedian known for role on ‘Coach’ dies at 86

Fraze FanFare serves as the Fraze Pavilion’s ticket office and also sells merchandise and gift certificates inside the atrium at the shopping center, 424 E. Stroop Road.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

NEW DETAILS: Rockin’ hootenanny planned for legendary Dayton bar owner 

Published: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 @ 5:05 PM

Michael
Michael "Mick" Montgomery at a 2003 Wood Guthrie show at Canal Street Tavern. Montgomery died on Jan. 13, 2018.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

Sharon Lane was crying and bleeding the first time she met Michael “Mick” Montgomery. 

They were on the playground at Fairport Elementary School and Lane, then 5 years old, had just fallen off the jungle gym and busted up her knee. 

“And then he came over and took my hand and said ‘you need to go see your teacher’,” Lane recalled of the then-third grader. “I just thought he was special. That was a simple gesture. I thought he was a ‘good big boy’.” 

Lane said her regard for Mick deepened after she began managing Canal Street Tavern, the legendary Dayton bar and music venue he opened in late 1981 at 

308 E. First St., in Dayton’s downtown. 

>> RELATED: Mick Montgomery, staple of Dayton music scene, dies 

“If he loved you, he would do anything for you,” she said of Mick. 

Mick died Saturday morning of natural causes at Kettering Medical Center. 

Funeral services for the 71-year-old are set for 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 20, at Tobias Funeral Home, 3970 Dayton Xenia Road, Beavercreek. 

Canal Street Tavern-style hootenanny will be held that day starting at 6 p.m. at 

The Brightside Music and Event Venue, 905 E. Third St., Dayton. 

>> RELATED: What you should know about Brightside 

Canal Street shut down after one final show Nov. 30, 2013. 

Canal Public House took over the former Canal Street space when the club closed. That business lost its licence in March 2016. 

Mick Montgomery surrounding by former employees at the closing of Canal Street in 2013.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

>> RELATED: Downtown Dayton music venue loses liquor license 

5th Street Wine & Deli rebranded itself and opened in the space as Canal Street Arcade and Deli in June 2017. 

Musicians and music fans are invited to attend the free celebration. 

Friends and family members say Mick brought hundreds of national acts to Dayton and provided a showcase for local talent. 

Lane said there were few things Mick loved more than music and that was expressed by the work he did to present in his beloved and intimate listening room. 

The club was simple, she said, noting it had a wooden floors that probably should have been replaced. 

>> MORE: Street named for local music icon to be dedicated

Canal Street’s bathrooms were notorious for being anything but modern.

A sign at Canal Street Tavern taken at the bar's closing party.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

The crowd wasn’t fancy and neither were the drinks. 

“It was a good drink in a clean glass,” Lane said.  

Those things didn’t matter in the grand scheme of things. 

“He always put music first. He put it before making money. He certainty put it before alcohol,” Lane said. “He wanted music to be the focus of that club and it was.” 

Lane, a noted Dayton musician, started hosting Canal Street’s musician’s co-op that first year it was open and was its manager the 10 or so years that followed. 

Before his passing, Mick was set to revive the co-op the first Friday of each month at Hannah’s, 121 N. Ludlow St. in downtown Dayton, starting at 9 p.m. Feb. 2, 2018. 

Lane will now step in for the friend she considered a big brother. 

“Mick has fought a long hard battle being sick,” Lane said. “I said, ‘go on brother, you’ve been a strong man.’” 

WYSO host Tod Weidner, a local musician and former co-op host, said Mick changed his life. 

Wiedner was among the local musicians who shared stories about Canal Street at 

Canal Street Stories: A Celebration and Reunion on Saturday, Jan. 6 at Yellow Cab Tavern. 

Mick, a Yellow Cab fan,  was there for the event and over the moon. 

>> RELATED: Spirit of iconic Dayton club rising from the ashes with these 2 events

“It was really nice that we were able to give him a night,” Weidner said. “ I am glad he got to bask in the adulation.” 

Weidner said he was naive the first time he walked into Canal Street as a 21-year-old contestant in the Dayton Band Playoffs, then an annual battle between local bands. 

Weidner’s band, the Rehab Doll, was creamed 130 to 30 by the far more popular band Walaroo South. 

Tod Weidner, Jamy Holliday, Mick Montgomery and Sharon Lane on stage at Canal Street Stories: A Celebration and Reunion from 7 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. on Saturday Jan. 6, 2017.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

Despite the loss, the Ludlow Falls native was hooked on Canal Street. 

“I fell in love with the place immediately. It was a very welcoming room,” he said. “It wasn’t much to look at. It was a weird little room and it was dark, but it had a mojo to it. A room takes on the magic of the people that played there.” 

The club hosted everything from folk, blues and country rock to bluegrass, indie rock and punk. Canal Street also drew well-known acts, such as Mary Chapin Carpenter, Los Lobos, The Del McCoury Band, Leo Kottke and Bela Fleck & the Flecktones. 

Before the band Phish became popular, it played Canal Street to a crowd of just 17 people. 

“The more I traveled playing music, the more I knew I took it (Canal Street) for granted,” Weidner said. 

Mick, Weidner said, was an evangelist of good music and strived to “hip” others to new artists and sounds. 

“I literally owe him everything,” he said. “I was a complete musical tadpole before I played Canal Street.” 

Before Canal Street, Weidner likened his music knowledge to looking through binoculars backwards. 

Afterward he said it was like seeing in cinerama. 

“Any eclectic knowledge I really have about music I have to credit to Mick and Canal Street,” Weidner said. “It was really great exposure to things I would never have seen. It was such a education every time I walked in there.” 

Chris Montgomery, the eldest of Mick’s three children, said he knows it is cliche, but he is blown away by the expression of love for his father. 

Chris said he was about 13 when his dad, at the time an art teacher at West Carrollton High School, bought the spaces that would be Canal Street from the red-haired owner of Evelyn’s Corner Cafe. 

Mick Montgomery and his son Eli outside of Canal Street in 2013.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

Chris said his father, a guitarist, filled his world with music. 

“He wasn’t a business man,” Chris said. “He was more about the musicians than growing an empire or making a huge amount of money.” 

The Oregon District home Mick rehabed is filled with CDs, albums and cassette tapes. 

“He usually listened to it all,” Chris said. “He would want to tell everybody about it, in his own words, “ ‘turn them on to it’.” 

>> Dayton icon Jerry Gillotti, Gilly’s nightclub owner, dies

Chris, now a deafblind education specialist at the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired in Austin, Texas, said his dad passed down a love of music. 

“I grew up playing music at Canal Street,” he said. “I can’t imagine a world without music. It is very much a part of my being.” 

Mick was extremely proud of his children and even as he grew ill, took steps to make sure they spent time together, his son said. 

Mick’s daughter, Hannah Montgomery, is studying law in Washington, D.C. His son, Eli Montgomery, lives in Dayton. 

The Dayton native’s list of survivors also include siblings Dennis Montgomery of Minnesota; Kathy Holt of Alaska and Patti Montgomery of Florida. 

“We loved him a lot,” Chris said. “He was not a typical dad, but we wouldn’t have wanted any other dad.” 

Mick left Dayton in 1967, a year after Chris was born. 

Mick Montgomery surrounding by former employees at the closing of Canal Street in 2013.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

The 21-or-so-year-old ended up on the corner of Haight and Ashbury streets in San Francisco, ground zero of the counterculture. 

Jamy Holliday, a long-time Canal Street manager and member of the seminal Dayton bands Mystery Addicts, Haunting Souls and Luxury Pushers, said Mick’s time in San Francisco and time in the1960s folk scene influenced the listening room he created in Dayton. 

>> RELATED: Mick Montgomery: Never say he was a ‘hippie’ at heart

“He respected musicians,” Holliday said. “He was always very supportive of providing a stage where the accomplished and the not-so accomplished could play the same stage.” 

Mick, Holliday said, was about music being a unifying force. 

Holliday was an eyeliner-wearing 17-year-old with a 14-inch mohawk when he first started working at Canal Street as a doorman for shows ranging from bluegrass to rock. 

Canal Street hosted the Women’s Series in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s. The yearly series featured lesbian and other feminist performers. 

Holliday said there were few problems because it was about the music. 

“He really did believe that music was an equaling and leveling instrument,” Holliday said of Mick. He sacrificed himself. He ate, slept and breathed Canal Street Tavern.” 

Former Dayton Daily News photographer Jan Underwood took thousands of photos at Canal Street during its more than three decades of operation. 

Mick wanted Canal Street to be a listening room in the purist sense of the term. 

Underwood said that all changed the night in 1984 that Jim “Rev. Cool” Carter, a longtime WYSO DJ, brought the cow punk band Rank and File to Canal Street’s stage. 

“We started handing table and chairs fire brigade style off the dance floor,” she said. 

She said those who frequented Canal Street were a family. 

“I took my son there when he was young because it was a safe place go,” she said. 

“If someone was drinking too much, they were not able to stay and ruin the night for everyone else.” 

Underwood said music was Mick’s life, and he wanted to share that love. 

“I went in there so many times and he’d say you have to check out this act that is coming next week, she said. “You would not be disappointed.”

 

Friends with Mick Montgomery.(Jessica Hansbauer,Jan Underwood)

Winter in full swing; Another cold blast sends temps to well below freezing

Published: Monday, January 15, 2018 @ 10:30 AM
Updated: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 @ 4:18 AM

People enjoy the winter weather by sledding at Mound Park.

Days and days of frigid air and multiple storms are so far marking the winter of 2017-18 in the Dayton region.  

>> RELATED: Wind Chill Advisory in effect until afternoon; drivers should watch for snow lingering roads

Champaign and Logan counties remain under a Level One snow emergencies were lifted Tuesday afternoon. Roadways throughout the region are slick because of the thin covering of ice and snow left behind after a day of snow showers.

A wind chill advisory that went into effect at 11 Monday night will remain in effect until Tuesday afternoon. 

Scattered snow showers during the Monday afternoon commute left behind a dusting to 2 inches.  

Two trucks got stuck when they tried to drive onto private property.

Current traffic conditions from the WHIO traffic center

Drivers should accelerate and deaccelerate more slowly during bad weather and drive a speed reasonable for the conditions, said Sgt. Mark Bowron, traffic reporter for WHIO Radio. 

RELATED: Check for delays or cancellations before heading to the airport

Braking on icy roads takes much longer than on dry pavement, increasing stopping times 8 to 10 seconds, Bowron said. On dry pavement, stop times usually fall in a range of 3 to 4 seconds.

Here are some Monday snowfall totals in local communities:

Troy 1.3 inches

Celina 1.0 inch

Dayton International Airport 0.9 inches

Lebanon 0.5 inches

West Alexandria 0.5 inches

Bellefontaine 0.9 inches

Springfield 0.8 inches

Xenia 0.6 inches

Fairborn 2.0 inches

Versailles 1.0 inch

Sidney 1.0 inch

Lebanon 0.5 inches 

RELATED: Timing of next round of snow

Tuesday is predicted to have wind chills dipping in a range of 10 below to 15 below zero. The high temperature on Tuesday will hover around 10 degrees. 

RELATED: Closings and Delays