Community meets on Troy transgender policy

Published: Monday, August 31, 2015 @ 10:07 AM
Updated: Wednesday, September 02, 2015 @ 3:48 PM


            Local schools weigh in on restroom controversy 
Local schools weigh in on restroom controversy 

Following the response to the Troy Junior High School transgender student using the boys bathroom, we reached out to area school districts with three questions regarding their policies. Their answers will be updated as we receive them. View school responses »


UPDATE @ 8:55 p.m. (Sept. 1): More than 100 people attended a community meeting at Koinos Christian Church also attended by Troy school board President Doug Trostle and two city council members.

All of council and the mayor, as well as the district superintendent and the school board, had been invited.

Superintendent Eric Herman, hours before the meeting, said he didn’t think he would attend. “I’m not sure it would help,” he said.

Bryan Kemper, a Troy resident and president of Stand True Pro-Life Outreach who organized the meeting, said, “we want to discuss our concerns with each other and with them and give them a chance to respond to us.”

The community meeting was told there would be no public debate, no public forum, only discussion about the school board’s policy regarding the use of restrooms and transgender students.

Nine concerns that meeting organizers said they had heard about the policy were listed. The audience was told that a letter listing concerns and challenging the policy was delivered to school officials earlier in the day by the Alliance Defending Freedom organization.

UPDATE @ 8 a.m. (Sept. 1)

About a dozen people have gathered outside the Troy Board of Education office Tuesday morning in peaceful demonstration both for and against a decision to allow a student who identifies as a male to use the men’s restroom.

UPDATE @ 6:50 p.m. (Aug. 31)

The controversy with Troy City Schools about the use of restrooms prompted the following response from the Ohio School Boards Association:

Sara Clark, director of legal services for the Ohio School Boards Association, said her office has gotten a lot more gender identity questions from school districts recently, citing media attention about the topic.

“I think a lot of (students) who maybe haven’t been comfortable coming out at school or having the conversation with their school district are now having those conversations,” Clark said.

Clark wrote a November article on transgender students that was sent to Ohio school districts by OSBA.

On one side, the article reports, there are no explicit federal legal protections for transgender students, and while more than a dozen states have their own laws offering some protections on the basis of gender identity, Ohio is not one of them.

On the other side, Clark said, the federal departments of education and justice argue that discrimination on the basis of gender identity or transgender status is “based on sex” and therefore in violation of Title IX (as Troy said).

The conflict creates a type of legal limbo that could eventually be decided by a Supreme Court ruling.

FIRST REPORT

The Troy City Schools superintendent said Monday that the district is complying with law in allowing a student who has declared they are of the male gender use the men’s restroom.

The district on Friday afternoon notified parents via a telephone message that denying a student’s request to use a restroom that matches the student’s gender identity is prohibited under federal Title IX.

As a result, the message said, students are allowed to use restrooms that match their gender identity. In addition, parents were notified that restrooms are available in each district building for students or visitors who do not want use the shared restrooms. Questions were referred to the office of Superintendent Eric Herman or any building principal.

Herman said school officials were approached by a student who has declared they are of the male gender and has asked to use the bathroom of that gender.

He said the automated phone message was distributed late on a Friday because that is when information was available to distribute to parents after discussions with legal counsel.

“We are trying to work our way through it the best we can,” Herman said. “My role in this is to comply with the law as superintendent.”

Bryan Kemper of Troy, who said he has six children in district schools, said he was “outraged” by the district’s message. He stood along Market Street near the board of education offices Monday morning with signs, one saying, and “My students deserve privacy/No co-ed bathrooms.”

He said a community meeting for concerned parents would be held Tuesday, Sept. 1, at 7 p.m. at the Koinos Christian Church at 722 Grant St. in Troy. “This will not be a debate or a bash session, we want an honest conversation about something many parents and students are deeply concerned about,” an email about the meeting said.

A parent of one high school student stopped to talk to Kemper as she headed for the board of education and the nearby high school. She said she planned to remove her daughter from the school.

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Wright-Patt training exercise sets off booms

Published: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 3:22 PM


            Wright-Patterson Air Force Base
            STAFF/File
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base(STAFF/File)

If you heard a loud noise today at Wright-Patterson, it was all part of training, a base spokesman says.

The Dayton Daily News and News Center 7 were contacted by residents inquiring what was the cause of the explosion.

A Wright-Patterson Explosive Ordnance Disposal bomb squad was scheduled to set off three explosions between noon and 4 p.m. Wednesday, according to base spokesman Daryl Mayer.

The unit periodically sets off explosions in training which are often heard outside the base.

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Top Gun pilot to speak at film screening

Published: Wednesday, February 14, 2018 @ 6:04 PM


            The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. BARRIE BARBER/STAFF
The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. BARRIE BARBER/STAFF

A real-life Top Gun is scheduled to be at a screening of Top Gun 3D at the Air Force Museum Theatre.

Retired Navy Capt. Ken Ginader, a former Top Gun instructor and F-14 pilot, was set to speak at the screening of film, set for 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Doors open at 6 p.m.

Ginader is the first speaker in the 2018 Living History Film Series at the museum.

Tickets cost $12 for audience members, or $10 for members of Friends of the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.

For more information, click onto http://www.afmuseum.com/livinghistory .

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Days of rain getting underway

Published: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 3:53 AM
Updated: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 3:22 PM

As the rain and temperatures continue to fall, rain may change to freezing rain across the northern Miami Valley. Temperatures are expected to fall to near or just below freezing in parts of Logan, Auglaize, Mercer, Darke, Champaign and Shelby Counties late Wednesday night into Thursday morning. This will lead to slick spots on elevated surfaces.

A Winter Weather Advisory has been issued for Auglaize, Champaign, Darke, Logan, Mercer, and Shelby counties, in effect from 1 a.m. Thursday through 11 a.m. 

Total ice accumulations overnight could reach one-tenth of an inch with limited viability also expected. 

A Flood Watch has also been issued for Butler, Clinton and Warren counties, starting at 7 p.m. Wednesday through 10 a.m. Feb. 25. 

>> Record-breaking warmth this week 

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

  • FLOOD WATCH for southern Miami Valley begins tonight
  • WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY for northern Miami Valley late tonight
  • 2 to 4 inches of rain possible through the weekend

>> 5-Day Forecast

DETAILED FORECAST

5 Day Forecast with Meteorologist McCall Vrydaghs

THIS EVENING: On and off rain. Temperatures will drop through the 30s.

Storm Center 7 weather graphic

>> County-by-County Weather

TONIGHT: Rain likely. As temperatures drop, the rain may become freezing rain across the northern Miami Valley. Elsewhere, temperatures should remain just above freezing, in the lower to middle 30s.

Storm Center 7 weather graphic

THURSDAY: Rain or freezing rain in the morning then drying out. Clouds will remain. Temperatures will hold in the middle 40s.

Graphic by Storm Center 7 Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell

FRIDAY: Rain likely. The rain may be heavy at times. It will be mild with highs in the upper 50s.

>> WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

SATURDAY: Rain likely. The rain may be heavy at times with a chance for some thunder, mainly south. Highs will be near 60 degrees.

SUNDAY: Rain will taper off early in the morning with clouds breaking. It will be windy and cooler with highs in the middle 50s.

MONDAY: Sunshine returns. Breezy and cool with highs in the lower 50s.

Storm Center 7 weather graphic

WHIO Weather App

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Judge denies legal challenge to tax law brought by Ohio cities

Published: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 6:49 PM


            Taxes
Taxes

A Franklin County judge today threw out a legal challenge brought by more than 160 municipalities — including Dayton, Centerville and Riverside — to a new state tax law.

The ruling means Ohio business tax filers can file municipal business taxes directly with the state instead of local municipalities. Cities challenged the law as an unconstitutional overreach by the state.

“Everything comes down to whether the General Assembly has the power or it doesn’t. In this case, the General Assembly has the power,” wrote Franklin County Common Pleas Judge David Cain in his decision.

RELATED: Ohio income tax collection change ‘a solution in search of a problem’

Ohio Tax Commissioner Joe Testa praised the ruling in a statement today.

“We are pleased that the court found this law to be constitutional,” Testa said. “It’s an important ruling for business taxpayers in Ohio who for too long have had to deal with this costly, complex process for local tax on business income.”

Businesses that want to file with the state for 2018 taxes have a deadline of March 1 to register through the Ohio Business Gateway.

The state says the change will reduce compliance costs for businesses up to an estimated $800 million if every business filing in multiple jurisdictions takes part, and will improve compliance.

RELATED: Dayton opposes state takeover of tax collections

The law applies to the municipal net profit tax, which is worth an estimated $600 million annually. It will benefit businesses that operate in multiple municipalities, allowing them to file one return with the state rather than filing separately in each city where they pay taxes.

The state will collect the money from businesses who chose to file with them, then dispense it to municipalities, charging them a half-percent processing fee.

This amounts to forcing cities to pay for a service they don’t want, according to Kent Scarrett, executive director of the Ohio Municipal League. He said cities plan to appeal the judge’s ruling.

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“The real difference is any filer that goes to the state, the municipality that used to review that filing will not be able to review the filing and will have no auditing or review capabilities,” he said.

“Dayton has no way to make sure that filing is accurate.”

Scarrett said the real fear is that lawmakers will expand to start collecting the billions of dollars every year collected by cities across the state in employer witholdings, and may take further steps to control local taxes.

“Once you control the revenue you control a lot of aspects of what happens,” he said. “It’s the state taking over, the state getting bigger, growing in size and eclipsing the powers of our local communities and the decisions they can make.”

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Ohio Department of Taxation officials say cities will have access to the same information from the state that they received from filers and can request filings be reviewed.

Taxation Spokesman Gary Gudmundson called predictions of dramatically expanding the program “a concern that the municipalities have expressed without grounding.”

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