Woman killed in Springfield area pedestrian crash ID’d

Published: Tuesday, March 13, 2018 @ 7:35 AM
Updated: Tuesday, March 13, 2018 @ 1:59 PM

Troopers said two people were struck, one fatally, after a driver stopped to help a driver of a disabled vehicle in Clark County.

UPDATE @ 2 p.m.

According to the Ohio State Highway Patrol impairment is not suspected in the crash that injured two pedestrians in Springfield Tuesday morning. The driver involved in the crash was not injured and the crash is still under investigation. 

UPDATE @ 11 a.m.:

The woman killed after being struck by a vehicle on Old Springfield Road has been identified as Dena Portis, 32, of Springfield.

Another person, Ta’Vaughn Tilley, 19, of Springfield, was transported to Miami Valley Hospital aboard a medical helicopter with “very serious injuries,” according to the Ohio State Highway Patrol. Tilley was also found to be in possession of a handgun.

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UPDATE @ 9:30 a.m.

The two pedestrians who were struck by a vehicle in Springfield early Tuesday morning had unsuccessfully attempted to jump start a car, according to Sgt.Merrill Thompson of the Springfield Highway Patrol. 

The vehicle that came to give assistance to a broken down car was facing westbound in the eastbound lane of Old Springfield Road when an eastbound car swerved to avoid the vehicle and hit two pedestrians. 

There were three people outside the vehicle at the time of the crash with one sustained fatal injuries, another was CareFlighted to Miami Valley Hospital and one person was uninjured. The driver was not injured in the crash and any further details are still under investigation.   

UPDATE @8:23 a.m.

Troopers said two people were struck, one fatally, after a driver stopped to help a driver of a disabled vehicle in Clark County.

The driver of a red SUV pulled the vehicle over into a field after it apparently became disabled, according to troopers. The driver of a black car arrived, and troopers said they believe that driver was there to help get the red SUV running or get it moved. The black car was facing the wrong way on Old Springfield Road.

As another car was traveling down the road, the driver swerved to avoid hitting the black vehicle, which was parked and facing the wrong direction, trooper said. As the driver swerved, two people standing in the roadway were struck.


The crash remains under investigation.

UPDATE @ 7:51 a.m: One person is confirmed as a fatality in the pedestrian strike that occurred on Old Springfield Road, according to officials.

Two individuals were struck by a vehicle Tuesday morning with the other individual’s injuries being described as critical. 

Careflight is on scene of the incident.


Careflight has been called to a pedestrian strike reported in Clark County Tuesday morning, per initial reports. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Coroner’s called to scene of crash, vehicle fire 

The incident was dispatched around 7:20 a.m. after two people were reportedly struck by a vehicle on Old Springfield Road. 

We have a crew on the way to the scene and will continue to update this story. 

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Officials investigate after person is shot in the mouth in Trotwood 

Published: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 12:32 AM
Updated: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 2:22 AM

UPDATE @ 2:25 a.m: Officials continue to investigate after a person was shot in the mouth in Trotwood early Friday morning.

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Two suspected metal thieves caught red-handed at Hewitt Soap Factory

Initial reports indicate the shooting occurred in the 4700 block of Knollcroft Road just after midnight. 

The suspect was not on scene when authorities arrived, but officials are describing the suspect vehicle as a black Lincoln SUV. 

The victim was transported to Miami Valley Hospital on unknown conditions.


Crews are responding to the 4700 block of Knollcroft Road in Trotwood on a reported shooting that occurred early Friday morning.

The incident was dispatched around 12:20 a.m., per initial reports.

We will continue to update this story with more details. 

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Dayton traffic from the WHIO Traffic Center

Published: Friday, March 02, 2018 @ 2:52 AM
Updated: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 1:22 AM

Traffic issues can be reported by calling our newsroom at 937-259-2237 or tweeting @WHIOTraffic .

Traffic conditions are updated every six minutes on AM 1290 and News 95.7 FM.

Major Highway Incidents

  • No incidents to report. 

Surface Street Incidents

  • No incidents to report. 

>> RELATED: WHIO App-Winter

>> RELATED: Track the latest conditions in your neighborhood on our live WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

Ongoing Construction & Other Closures 

Live look at highways on our traffic cameras here.

Latest traffic conditions are also available on our traffic map. 


  • Arlington Road between Pleasant Plain and Upper Lewisburg Salem Road, BRIDGE CLOSURE, March 5 - Sept. 30. All ramps for I-70 will remain open. 
  • Keowee Street north of Stanley Avenue, bridge closed until 2019. The official detour is: Keowee Street to Stanley Avenue to I-75 to Wagner Ford Road and back to Dixie. More information is available here.
  • Stewart Street Ramp to US 35 East, RAMP CLOSURE March 28 - Sept 30, 2018. The official detour is: Stewart Street to Edwin C. Moses Boulevard to I-75 north to US 35 west to James H. McGee Blvd. to US 35 east.
  • SR 48 between First Street and Riverdale Street, Lane closures March 19 - April 1. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • SR 4 north/south between I-70 and Lower Valley Pike, Lane closure April 2 - 26. One northbound and two southbound lanes will remain open. 
  • I-75 north Ramp to US 35 west, RAMP CLOSURE, March 12 - Sept. 30. The official detour is: I-75 north to US 35 east to Jefferson/Main Street to Ludlow Street to US 35 west. 
  • I-75 north Ramp to US 35 west and east, Lane width restriction until Apr. 1, 2018. One lane will remain open on the ramp with a width of 11 feet.
  • US 35 east between Edwin C. Moses Boulevard and Jefferson Street, Overnight lane closures March 19 at 8 p.m. - March 20 at 6 a.m. Two eastbound lanes will remain open.


  • N. Market Street between Foss Way/Kirk Lane and Stonyridge Avenue, ROAD CLOSURE March 5 at 7 a.m. - Aug. 10 at 5 p.m. 
  • US 36 westbound between Scott Drive and Kienle Drive, Lane closure March 26 - June 30. One westbound lane will remain open. 


  • SR 47 between Fifth Avenue and Wilkinson Avenue, Lane closures Jan. 21 - Nov. 27. One lane will remain open in each direction at all times. 
  • SR 274 between Shroyer Road and Island Avenue, Lane closure April 9 - June 9. One lane will remain open in each direction. 


  • SR 121 between Washington Street and Fairview Street, ROAD CLOSURE Mar. 12 - April 13. The official detour is: SR 722 to US 127 to SR 503. 
  • SR 121 between Arnold Street and Harter Road, ROAD CLOSURE Mar. 12 - April 13. The official detour is: SR 722 to US 127 to SR 503. 


  • I-70 east Ramp to I-675 north, RAMP CLOSURE March 15 - Aug. 15. The official detour is: I-70 east to I-675 south to SR 444 to I-675 north


  • US 68 between SR 508 and Township Road 310, ROAD CLOSURE April 23 - 27. The official detour is: US 68 to SR 296 to SR 29 to SR 235 to SR 47 to US 68. 

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Top AF leader: ‘You have to learn to say, that’s not good enough’

Published: Thursday, March 22, 2018 @ 10:30 PM

Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson addressed more than 240 graduates of the Air Force Institute of Technology on Thursday evening at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. BARRIE BARBER /STAFF
Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson addressed more than 240 graduates of the Air Force Institute of Technology on Thursday evening at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. BARRIE BARBER /STAFF

Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson told newly minted “technical leaders” of the Air Force Institute of Technology to never stop asking why and to be innovators who build strong and trusted relationships to solve the nation’s national security challenges.

Wilson, an Air Force Academy alumnae and former Rhodes scholar at Oxford, spoke Thursday night to more than 240 AFIT graduates among an audience of 1,200 at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.

RELATED: Threats will drive BRAC strategy, Air Force leader says

Among three key points of advice, the top Air Force civilian leader told graduates to be critical thinkers who challenge assumptions about why.

“You will also now serve as technical leaders and as leaders in technology and science you have to learn four important words. You have to learn to say, ‘that’s not good enough.’”

The secretary cited recent hypoxia-like incidents among pilots experiencing oxygen loss in some of the most sophisticated aircraft, such as the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, and more basic training aircraft such as the propeller-driven T-6 Texan, as an example to keep asking why and not be pressured to cut short the search for answers.

She told graduates they should not be afraid to say no, even to superiors, until a solution is known.

Wilson told them they must also be innovators.

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Air Force leader says total dominance not a ‘birthright’

“Innovation doesn’t come from requirement statements,” she said. “There was never a requirement statement for a silicon chip. There was never a requirement statement for Uber. There was probably wasn’t a requirement statement for GPS.

“If you’re not making mistakes as an engineer, you’re probably only proving that what you already know really does work,” she said. “That’s not innovation. We need you to push the bounds of what you know.”

The high-flying, record-breaking Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird spy plane with a needle-like sleek shape demanded overcoming a series of technical problems, from aviators in space suits ejecting at extreme speeds and altitudes to heat-resistant glass that wouldn’t distort surveillance cameras view.

“The result was an air-breathing monster faster than a speeding bullet,” she said. “What would your innovation be?”

Developing trusted relationships is the third key, Wilson said.

“The work that you are about matters, and the people matter more,” she said.

EXCLUSIVE: Top Air Force general says ‘all programs are at risk’

From her time at the Air Force Academy to serving on the national security council staff, the former New Mexico congresswoman said she could count “on one hand” people she could call on at any time.

“Those kinds of relationships are built over a long period of time are priceless in your life,” she said.

The Air Force’s top leaders listen and trust each other and see things from different perspectives to address national security issues, she said.

“You have everything to gain as young officers and civilians in the Air Force to see alternative perspectives, to find your partners in crime who are going to push you and make you better because steel sharpens steel,” she told AFIT graduates.

“The United States Air Force relies on the most advanced technology to defend our nation and project power in the air and space around the globe,” Wilson added. “We’re going to lean on you. We’re going to lean hard on you as the next generation of scientists and engineers in air and space.

“So choose to ask why, choose to be an innovator, and choose to build strong relationships throughout your professional lives,” she said. “Our nation needs you desperately and future generations are counting on you.”

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How to keep Facebook from accessing your information 

Published: Thursday, March 22, 2018 @ 5:21 PM

Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica data grab scandal started with a personality quiz app but it’s not the only Facebook App you should be worried about, according to tech experts. 

“You’ve probably given away a lot of information and unfortunately that information is used to manipulate people,” said Gayle Jenkins, the owner of DNA Computers in Kettering.

Jenkins found over 100 apps on her own Facebook account that have grabbed her profile information, friend list, posts, likes, or even photos she’s posted and photos she’s tagged in. 

A look at my phone revealed over 70 apps including “Apply Magic Sauce.”

According to their website, the app translates individuals digital footprints into psychological profiles. Jenkins showed me how to get rid of it. 


To remove or modify these Facebook Apps and quizzes using your phone:

Open the Facebook app

Click the menu (which is typically designated by three lines)

Select “account settings”

Click “apps”

Choose apps you want to delete 


To delete Facebook Apps on a desktop or laptop:

Log on to Facebook

Click the menu (the small triangle in the upper right corner)

Click “settings”

Click “apps” (located in a list on the left side of the screen)

Select an app 

Select the pencil icon to modify settings or click the “X” to delete the app


You can turn off all app access completely, but Jenkins recommends deleting apps one by one.

“if you scroll down past the apps there is a box where you can turn off Platform. Platform is the interface which allows Facebook to work with third-party websites and software. If you disable it, you can’t log into anything with Facebook anymore,” said Jenkins.

Jenkins warns of another big risk with access you grant these apps.

“If they collect enough information they could actually carry out a social engineering hack,” Jenkins said, “potentially answering your security questions or pretending to be you and call a company and request access to information about you.” 

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