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Bugged? Here’s why mosquitoes in the Dayton area may be more plentiful -- and vicious

Published: Sunday, August 13, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

Having a mosquito problem is one that you don't want to have. Here is a brief descrption of how they grow and what you can do to prevent the problem.

You’re minding your own business when the attackers come into your backyard like bloodthirsty thieves in the night.

They attack arms and legs, elbows and even toes with tube-like mouths.

Mosquitoes are creepy jerks alright. 

And Suzanne Mills-Wasniak of the Ohio State Extension's Montgomery County office said you might be onto something if you think there are more of these potentially life-threatening pests in the Dayton area than normal.

Conditions have been right for prolific mosquito breeding, Mills-Wasniak , the extension’s educator for agriculture and natural resources, told this news organization.  

>> MORE: 5 ways to stop mosquitoes from attacking you

“We’ve had a lot of rain and that’s going to be a major cause of increased breeding,” she noted. 

BREEDING POOLS

Getty(Mario Tama)

Thus far this year, WHIO Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell said the area has seen about 34 inches of rain, eight more than average. 

“That is a lot,” he said. “We’ve had a wet June and July.” 

There is a spot of good news. Elwell said the summer has been cooler and not as humid. 

>> MORE: 5 Day Forecast with Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell

“They would be even worse than they are,” he said. “Warm, muggy evenings is what they love.” 

He also says rainfall numbers are trending down for August.

THIS IS NOT AN EPIDEMIC 

Things aren’t cut and dry. 

Whether you have more mosquitoes or not might be a matter of where you live and how well you control potential breeding grounds, according to Tom Hut,  Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County’s Bureau of Special Services’ supervisor.

>> MORE: The best and worst products to prevent mosquito bites

“The hot spots can kind of shift through the summer,” he said. “It’s not any worse than any usual summer. Mosquito rely on standing water to breed.”

More than itchy skin is the risk. 

Seventeen of the 123 mosquito traps that have been set during the 2017 mosquito season have tested positive for West Nile. 

Hut said that is about three times less than tested positive during the 2012 West Nile epidemic.

>> MORE:  Worst of West Nile likely past, CDC says 

YOU ARE NOT DEFENSELESS 

There are also no known human carriers of the Zika virus, which is transmitted from humans to mosquitoes to humans, Hut said. 

Tom Hut,  Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County’s Bureau of Special Services’ supervisor, with mosquito traps.(Photo: Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County’s)

That said, Hut said Asian tiger mosquitoes (aedes albopictus) are known carriers of Zika and other viruses. West Nile can cause inflammation of the brain.

>> MORE: Zika threat a boon for local mosquito-control companies

Hut encourages people to take mosquito bite prevention seriously.

That includes wearing mosquito repellent (carry it in your car), long sleeve and pants and removing standing water. 

Check gutters, downspouts and catch basins  for standing water and remove old water out of bird baths at least weekly. 

Hut said mosquitoes don’t typically venture far from where they hatch. 

The only live a few weeks and can go from egg to adult in seven days. 

Even very small containers like bottle caps can be mosquito nurseries. 

“It doesn’t take much water to attract a mosquito to lay her egg,” he said. 

TIPS TO AVOID BEING BITTEN BY MOSQUITOES, FROM THE OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

• Clothing will help protect you from mosquito bites. When possible, wear long sleeves, long pants and socks in addition to repellent when outdoors. 

• Repel mosquitoes when going outdoors during mosquito season by using repellents that contain an EPA-registered active ingredient such as DEET or picaridin. Follow the directions on the label. 

• Treat items such as boots, pants, sock, and tents with permethrin or purchase permethrin-treated clothing and gear. Follow label directions. 

• Be aware of peak mosquito hours. Mosquitoes are most active and biting during the early morning and late evening hours. If outdoors at dawn or dusk, take extra care to use repellent and wear protective clothing. 

• Keep window and door screens closed and in good repair to keep mosquitoes out of your house.

• Mosquitoes rest in tall weeds. Keep weeds cut short to help deter mosquitoes. 

• Avoiding mosquitoes doesn’t mean kids have to stay inside in front of the TV. Get them outside and playing, but remember — a couple of seconds applying an effective repellent to exposed skin and clothing will help everyone stay healthy. Follow the directions on the label.

 

What you need to know about the 2017 solar eclipse

Published: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 @ 3:43 PM
Updated: Saturday, August 19, 2017 @ 8:00 PM

What should I not do during the Great American Eclipse in the Miami Valley?

The Great American Eclipse will be visible across the country on Aug. 21. 

In the Miami Valley, the solar eclipse will begin shortly after 1 p.m. Aug. 21. It will take the moon almost three hours to cross the face of the sun, from one side to the other. 

RELATED: 7 things to know about the rare total solar eclipse 

RELATED: Solar Eclipse 2017: Read this before looking at the sun

Many cities across America will see a total eclipse, but our area will only have a partial eclipse. Almost 90 percent of the sun will be eclipsed by the moon. The last total solar eclipse that passed over the Miami Valley was more than a thousand years ago.

QUIZ: How much do you know about solar eclipses? 

VIDEO: How August’s solar eclipse will look in the Miami   

RELATED: How will your pets react to the solar eclipse?

Upcoming Total Solar Eclipse Stirs Fears of Apocalypse

The last total solar eclipse that was visible in the contiguous United States was on Feb. 26, 1979.  

#SkyWitness7 has a several resources for everything you need to know about the eclipse:

There won’t be a total solar eclipse in the Miami Valley. Here’s what you need to know to safely watch the Great American Eclipse

>> RELATED: How to get your free pair of Storm Center 7 solar eclipse glasses

The Great American Eclipse will be visible across the country in August. Watch this video to learn the when the eclipse will be visible in your community

A partial eclipse will start at 1:02 p.m. and end at 3:51 p.m. in Dayton on Aug. 21. Get more facts about the Great American Eclipse here

Check out the WHIO Space Glossary to learn the difference between an annular, hybrid and lunar eclipse. 

HAVE QUESTIONS? Ask the Storm Center 7 team through their Facebook and Twitter pages. This story will be updated daily with the latest questions from you! 

An even better eclipse coming in 2024 to the Miami Valley

Q: Can I watch it with a mirror? Is the reflection safe? A: That still isn’t a safe way to view the eclipse. Using a mirror reflection is just as dangerous as staring at the sun and will allow too much sunlight into your eye.

Q: What about 3D glasses from the movie that look like the solar eclipse glasses, can I use those? A: 3D glasses from the movies may look like some of the solar eclipse glasses but they too offer no protection. They aren’t made of the same filter. Only ISO compliant solar eclipse glasses have the proper solar filter to directly watch the eclipse. Solar eclipse glasses reduce the amount of sunlight down to a safe level for your eyes since the sun is so bright and also produces ultraviolet radiation that can cause permanent eye damage if you look at it with the wrong equipment. Remember, multiple pairs of sunglasses won’t work either. If you can’t get the proper solar eclipse glasses, watch it online with us on Aug 21st from 1-4 p.m. or make a pinhole projector. 

Q: If we are going to have a solar eclipse does it mean that those on the other side of earth will have a lunar eclipse? What will be happening in Australia during our solar eclipse? Do they experience it a day ahead of us?  A: A lunar eclipse occurs when the sun, earth and moon align. Earth moves in between the sun and the moon, blocking sunlight to the moon’s surface. This will not be the case this time around as the orbit of the moon will pass between the sun and earth creating a solar eclipse instead. Because the moon’s orbit is titled, as it continues its path around the earth it will move out of the direct alignment with the sun, ending the eclipse. At the time of the eclipse in the U.S., it will be night in Australia. They will have a dark sky, but no moon as the moon is on our side of the globe. This also means it’s not possible for them to have a lunar eclipse. In order for that to happen the moon would have to be on the Australia side with Earth traveling between the moon and the sun.

Q: What are chances that we will have cloudy skies on eclipse day?

A: During summer, there’s always is a good chance that clouds could develop during the heat of the day. The solar eclipse will occur between 1:02 p.m. and 3:51 p.m. in Dayton. Based on historical cloudiness data from the NOAA National Center for Environmetal Information 10-year hourly climate normals dataset, there is a 20 percent chance of an overcast day. Anything less should allow for better conditions to see the eclipse at some point.

>> Download the FREE Storm Center 7 app

Q: How will shadows look during the solar eclipse? 

A: Your shadow on a normal day will show your general shape. During a solar eclipse, a partial one like we will see, the light from the sun will be more focused (about a sliver will remain during max eclipse). This allows the sunlight to come from a smaller source and your shadow to become more defined. According to Rick Fienberg, from the American Astronomical Society, you can see such a sharp image of your shadow that the arms on your hair will be visible. Another interesting thing you could see because we won’t be in the path of totality is objects like trees casting crescent shaped shadows. Like a pinhole projector, the hole between leaves on a tree act to project the solar eclipse on the ground creating crescent shaped shadows! Here’s an example from NASA’s picture of the day

Q: What happens more often -- solar or lunar eclipses? 

A: Solar eclipses are fairly numerous, about two to four per year, but the area on the ground covered by totality is only about 50 miles wide. In any given location on Earth, a total eclipse happens only once every hundred years or so. However, for some "lucky" locations they can occur as little as a few years apart. An example is the Aug. 21, 2017 and April 8, 2024, eclipses, which will be viewed at the same spot near Carbondale, Illinois. The eclipse will also be total in the Miami Valley in 2024. Eclipses of the Moon by the Earth's shadow are actually less numerous than solar eclipses; however, each lunar eclipse is visible from over half the Earth. At any given location, you can have up to three lunar eclipses per year, but some years there may be none. In any one calendar year, the maximum number of eclipses is four solar and three lunar.

Q: How do I know if my solar eclipse glasses are safe to use?

A: You will want to make sure you are using solar eclipse glasses or a viewfinder only, says Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini. Sunglasses, 3D movie glasses or anything else will not be safe enough to view the solar eclipse with.

When you have glasses make sure that they have an “ISO” icon on them and that they have this sequence of numbers (ISO 12312-2). You also want to check the manufacturer. Some popular companies that certify their glasses include, Rainbow Symphony, American Paper Optics, Thousand Oaks Optical or TSE 17.

Making sure you get them directly through the manufacturer, a local library or from one of the WHIO giveaways will help to ensure you indeed have the right type of solar eclipse glasses.

If you can’t get glasses in time you can enjoy the eclipse by watching live videos from 1 to 4 p.m. Aug. 21 on WHIO-TV, online at whio.com and on the WHIO Facebook page. Also, learn how to make your own viewfinder here.

Q: Is it true there is another, better eclipse coming to Dayton?

A: Yes! If we miss the eclipse on Aug. 21, we won’t have to wait to long to get another shot. The next eclipse will be even better for Dayton as it will be a total solar eclipse in our area. It will occur on April 8, 2024 and if the skies are clear (that’s a big if), it should be spectacular as it will occur right around lunchtime! So set your alarm or mark your calendars!

Q: Are there different types of solar eclipses? 

A: Yes. A total solar eclipse (like the one Aug. 21) occurs when the sun, moon and Earth are directly in line. The people in the center of the moons shadow along its path from coast to coast will see the moon completely block the sun and it will get darker for a few minutes. A partial solar eclipse occurs when the sun, moon and Earth aren’t perfectly in line. This allows the moon to still obstruct the sun’s surface but only part of it. Finally, an annular solar eclipse still needs a line-up of the sun, moon and earth but this time the moon is farthest from the Earth. This means that the moon looks smaller from our perspective and will cover the sun but appear to leave a ring of brightness around it. You can read more about them here.

Q: Will gravity change that day?  

A: As crazy as it sounds, yes the gravitational force felt here on Earth will be different during the solar eclipse on Aug. 21. According to NASA, the average person will feel about 1.7 ounces lighter because the moon and sun will have a gravitational pull in the same direction, which will be opposite the Earth’s gravitational force.

Q: How long will the solar eclipse last when watching in the Miami Valley?

A: In Dayton, the moon will begin to eclipse the sun around 1:02 p.m. Then, the maximum eclipse or when the moon will cover most of the sun (about 89 percent in Dayton) is at 2:28 p.m. The eclipse will end around 3:51 p.m. This will make the eclipse about two hours and 50 minutes from start to finish. You can get the timing of the eclipse down to the second by finding your city right here.

Q: Where is the best place within 50 miles of Dayton to see the eclipse?

A: The farther southwest you go, the greater the eclipse will be. However, there will not be much variability within 50 miles of Dayton. For example, the sun will be eclipsed by the moon by approximately 89 percent in Dayton. In Cincinnati, it will be 91 percent eclipsed. You would have to travel to southwestern Kentucky or middle Tennessee to see the total eclipse. Keep in mind, experts are warning of extremely heavy traffic on the day of the eclipse thanks to the “eclipse-chasers,” so be prepared! For details on the eclipse and its start, peak and end times in your part of the Miami Valley, go to whio.com and click on #SkyWitness7 

Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini talks about the timing of the eclipse

Q: What time does a solar eclipse occur? 

A: A solar eclipse happens only when a new moon occurs for the month and the orbit of the moon lines up between the Earth and the sun just right to produce a shadow on the Earth. We have a new moon each month but not always a solar eclipse because of the moon’s orbit. Each solar eclipse begins around sunrise at some point in the path and ends around sunset in a different location at the end of the path. Specific timing of what you see depends on your location. In Dayton,  the max eclipse time will be around 2:28 p.m. The next total solar eclipse in the U.S. is April 8, 2024. 

You can find the specific timing of the start, max and end of the eclipse in YOUR city by clicking here.

Q: What makes this a total solar eclipse? 

A: The Great American Solar Eclipse on Aug. 21 will be a total eclipse, which means the sun will be completely covered by the moon. There are usually 2 and up to 5 solar eclipses every year, but they are usually not total. But on Aug. 21, parts of the country will be in the path of totality, meaning that the sun will be completely covered. In the path of totality, it will be safe to look directly at the sun. Outside of the path of totality, which is where we are, it is NOT safe to look directly at the sun.

Q: Will there be a temperature change when the solar eclipse happens?

A: Yes. As the moon moves in front of the sun, there will be a noticeable change in temperature. It will get darker and feel cooler because the sun’s rays will be blocked by the moon.

Q: Can we look directly at the eclipse or do we need special glasses?  

A: Because we will not be in the path of totality in the Miami Valley, it is not safe to look directly at the eclipse, even during the maximum locally. We will get about an 89 percent eclipse, meaning the moon will cover 89 percent of the sun. This means that roughly 11 percent of the sun will still shine during the maximum. The best way you can see the eclipse is with special glasses or by creating your own viewfinder. 

Q: Do I need a special filter for my camera to take pictures or video fof the eclipse?

A: While there are different makes and models of cameras, the short answer is yes. Most cameras are not made to shoot the sun directly. The best option is to get a filter that will fit your camera to safely shoot the eclipse. Without a filter, you run the risk of damaging your device. As for what kind of filter you need, the best thing to do is contact the manufacturer and see what filter they recommend.

Q: What is the umbra and penumbra? 

A: The umbra and penumbra are different parts of the shadow created by the eclipse. In the case of the Great American Solar Eclipse, the umbra is the shadow that is darkest and is what creates the path of totality. The penumbra is what everyone outside of the path of totality in the continental United States will see during the eclipse.

Q: If we have a solar eclipse, does it mean that those on the other side of Earth have a lunar eclipse? What will be happening in Australia during our solar eclipse?

A: A lunar eclipse occurs when the sun, Earth and moon align. Earth moves in between the sun and moon, blocking sunlight to the moon. This will not be the case this time as the orbit of the moon will pass between the sun and Earth, creating a solar eclipse intead. Because the moon’s orbit is tilted, as it continues its path around Earth it will move out of the direct alignment with the sun, ending the eclipse. During the eclipse in the U.S., it will be night in Australia. They will have a dark sky, but no moon as the moon is on our side of the globe. This also mean’s it’s not possible for them to have a lunar eclipse.

Q. What should I not do during the Great American Eclipse?

A. Here’s a list of DO NOTs dor the Great American Eclipse:

  • Don’t look directly at the sun without the proper eye protection, even during the maximum.
  • Don’t photograph the eclipse without the proper filter for your camera or smartphone. 
  • Don’t forget the times. It starts at 1:02 p.m., maxes at 2:28 p.m. and ends at 3:51 p.m. in Dayton. 
  • Don’t spend too much time photographing the event. Take time to enjoy and take in this rare event; a lot of photos will be available on social media. 
  • Don’t look at the eclipse while driving. This poses a danger to not only you, but to others around you. 
  • Don’t forget to charge your device prior to the event. 
  • Don’t forget that traffic jams may occur the afternoon, even in places that are not in the path of totality. 
  • Don’t be sad or upset that we’re not in the path of totality. We will be in April 2024. 

Don’t worry about NOT seeing the eclipse if there are clouds. We have you covered with our facebook live/live stream on WHIO.com.

Q: What do I need to do to be a part of your eclipse coverage Monday?

A: We would love for anyone and everyone to be part of our eclipse coverage on Monday. You can send us your photos and videos via social media using the hashtag #SkyWitness7, tagging our pages, or emailing them to us. It's important to know though that we want to make sure everyone is safe during the eclipse, so only take direct photos or video of the sun if you have the proper filter for your camera or device. Aside from that, we want to see how you are viewing the eclipse so please send them to us. Some will be shown on our Facebook live and on WHIO-TV Ch 7!

Great American Eclipse: More clearing than clouds

Published: Sunday, August 20, 2017 @ 12:17 PM

A look at the forecast for Eclipse day in the Dayton area

Monday is the Great American Eclipse, and all eyes are on the forecast. 

The good news, it looks like we'll have a pretty good chance to see the eclipse, according to Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Brett Collar.

We'll see daytime clouds develop during the heating of the day. These clouds will pass overhead at times, but there will be gaps between these clouds.

RELATED: Everything you need to know about the eclipse

At a given point Monday afternoon, we're expecting more clearing than clouds. 

Some models hint that a stray shower could develop, but with what's called a "cap" in place, the chance for rain will be slim to none.

Solar Eclipse 2017: Read this before looking at the sun

QUIZ: How much do you know about solar eclipses?

It will be a hot and somewhat muggy day. Highs will be in the upper 80s, and some spots may hit 90 degrees. 

When you factor in the humidity, it will feel more like the lower to middle 90s. If you are planning on being outside Monday afternoon, it's important to stay cool, hydrated and wear sunscreen as the UV index will be high.

Civil rights activist, comedian Dick Gregory dies weeks after local performance

Published: Saturday, August 19, 2017 @ 11:06 PM

Dick Gregory, dead at 84, speaking recently

Civil rights activist and comedian Dick Gregory died Saturday, his family confirmed in a social media post.

He passed away at age 84 in Washington, DC., nearly three weeks after his one-night appearance earlier this month in the Miami Valley.

The best-selling author and 1968 write-in presidential candidate performed Aug. 2 at the Dayton Funny Bone at The Greene Towne Center.

RELATED: Comedy legend is in Dayton for one night only

Although he began as a comedian, he was active in social justice. He was allied with Martin Luther King Jr. and Andrew Young, and participated in sit-ins and marches.

Gregory was hospitalized with a serious, but stable condition, his son, Christian, said Thursday. 

He is survived by his wife, Lillian, and their 10 children.

From peanuts to pizza: Marion’s Piazza marks 52 years

Published: Friday, August 18, 2017 @ 10:39 AM

It’s been more than 50 years since Dayton fell in love with a thin crust square cut pizza.

It’s been more than 50 years since Dayton fell in love with a thin crust square cut pizza.

Marion Glass, a scrappy local kid who as a youngster sold peanuts and soda at baseball games, opened the first Marion’s Piazza, a staple of Dayton dining, on Aug. 19, 1965. 

Marion Glass (left), the founder of Marion’s Piazza, and his son Roger photographed in 1976. DAYTON DAILY NEWS ARCHIVE

Ambition and a solid work ethic put Glass on the path to success. 

“My family was poor,” Glass told the Dayton Daily News in 1976. “I dropped out of Kiser High School when I was a junior. I wasn’t afraid to work and I wanted to learn.” 

In the 1930s Glass organized a group of boys to take to the streets on bicycles and sell ice cream bars.

Marion Glass, the founder of Marion's pizza, in a 1995. DAYTON DAILY NEWS ARCHIVE(copy)

“We would have big days when Ringling Brothers Circus would come to the fairgrounds,” said Glass. “People would come out by the hundreds to watch them set up the tents and we would sell a lot of ice cream to them.” 

Selling the frozen treat eventually led to store fronts on Xenia Ave. and then N. Main Street. After World War II Glass opened his own vending company and maintained 1,000 cigarette and candy machines in a 40-mile area. 

Glass initially got into the pizza business as the owner of three Cassano’s pizza franchises. But he had his own ideas. “I felt that it was time to have a dining room pizza house,” he said. 

The community had never seen a restaurant like the one at 460 Patterson Rd. in Dayton where a large deluxe pizzas cost $2.50. The restaurant had seating for 200, four pizza ovens and the largest walk in cooler in town according to a 1965 article in the Dayton Herald. 

 Marion's Piazza marked its 40th anniversary by selling their pizza at 1965 prices. The line for pizza wrapped around the store at Patterson Road. DAYTON DAILY NEWS ARCHIVE(Dayton Daily News)

Glass hired an interior decorator to create the feel of an outdoor café in Italy. Old brick, rustic iron décor, and canvas awnings complemented the look and lent itself to the name piazza, an enclosed veranda. 

Marion’s Piazza is not only a Dayton tradition, but was also the site for Wednesday night cast parties, from 1966 to 1995, for the Kenley Players summer stock theater company. Dozens of black-and-white photos of the famous players line the walls today.

Marion's Piazza has been voted best pizza and best place to eat with kids in the "Best of Dayton" contest.

 Big name stars like Mickey Rooney, Cloris Leachman, Sally Field and Frankie Avalon dined and reveled at Marion’s. In 1975, Henry Winkler, who played “The Fonz” on Happy Days, drew 2,000 people to the restaurant. 

The business has grown to nine locations in the Dayton area. Founder Marion Glass died at age 92 in 2006. Today his son Roger Glass runs the business.