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Bugged? Here’s why mosquitoes in the Dayton area may be more plentiful -- and vicious

Published: Sunday, August 13, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

Having a mosquito problem is one that you don't want to have. Here is a brief descrption of how they grow and what you can do to prevent the problem.

You’re minding your own business when the attackers come into your backyard like bloodthirsty thieves in the night.

They attack arms and legs, elbows and even toes with tube-like mouths.

Mosquitoes are creepy jerks alright. 

And Suzanne Mills-Wasniak of the Ohio State Extension's Montgomery County office said you might be onto something if you think there are more of these potentially life-threatening pests in the Dayton area than normal.

Conditions have been right for prolific mosquito breeding, Mills-Wasniak , the extension’s educator for agriculture and natural resources, told this news organization.  

>> MORE: 5 ways to stop mosquitoes from attacking you

“We’ve had a lot of rain and that’s going to be a major cause of increased breeding,” she noted. 


Getty(Mario Tama)

Thus far this year, WHIO Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell said the area has seen about 34 inches of rain, eight more than average. 

“That is a lot,” he said. “We’ve had a wet June and July.” 

There is a spot of good news. Elwell said the summer has been cooler and not as humid. 

>> MORE: 5 Day Forecast with Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell

“They would be even worse than they are,” he said. “Warm, muggy evenings is what they love.” 

He also says rainfall numbers are trending down for August.


Things aren’t cut and dry. 

Whether you have more mosquitoes or not might be a matter of where you live and how well you control potential breeding grounds, according to Tom Hut,  Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County’s Bureau of Special Services’ supervisor.

>> MORE: The best and worst products to prevent mosquito bites

“The hot spots can kind of shift through the summer,” he said. “It’s not any worse than any usual summer. Mosquito rely on standing water to breed.”

More than itchy skin is the risk. 

Seventeen of the 123 mosquito traps that have been set during the 2017 mosquito season have tested positive for West Nile. 

Hut said that is about three times less than tested positive during the 2012 West Nile epidemic.

>> MORE:  Worst of West Nile likely past, CDC says 


There are also no known human carriers of the Zika virus, which is transmitted from humans to mosquitoes to humans, Hut said. 

Tom Hut,  Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County’s Bureau of Special Services’ supervisor, with mosquito traps.(Photo: Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County’s)

That said, Hut said Asian tiger mosquitoes (aedes albopictus) are known carriers of Zika and other viruses. West Nile can cause inflammation of the brain.

>> MORE: Zika threat a boon for local mosquito-control companies

Hut encourages people to take mosquito bite prevention seriously.

That includes wearing mosquito repellent (carry it in your car), long sleeve and pants and removing standing water. 

Check gutters, downspouts and catch basins  for standing water and remove old water out of bird baths at least weekly. 

Hut said mosquitoes don’t typically venture far from where they hatch. 

The only live a few weeks and can go from egg to adult in seven days. 

Even very small containers like bottle caps can be mosquito nurseries. 

“It doesn’t take much water to attract a mosquito to lay her egg,” he said. 


• Clothing will help protect you from mosquito bites. When possible, wear long sleeves, long pants and socks in addition to repellent when outdoors. 

• Repel mosquitoes when going outdoors during mosquito season by using repellents that contain an EPA-registered active ingredient such as DEET or picaridin. Follow the directions on the label. 

• Treat items such as boots, pants, sock, and tents with permethrin or purchase permethrin-treated clothing and gear. Follow label directions. 

• Be aware of peak mosquito hours. Mosquitoes are most active and biting during the early morning and late evening hours. If outdoors at dawn or dusk, take extra care to use repellent and wear protective clothing. 

• Keep window and door screens closed and in good repair to keep mosquitoes out of your house.

• Mosquitoes rest in tall weeds. Keep weeds cut short to help deter mosquitoes. 

• Avoiding mosquitoes doesn’t mean kids have to stay inside in front of the TV. Get them outside and playing, but remember — a couple of seconds applying an effective repellent to exposed skin and clothing will help everyone stay healthy. Follow the directions on the label.


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Winter Storm Watch issued for system that could bring snow to area this weekend

Published: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 @ 10:08 PM
Updated: Thursday, March 22, 2018 @ 6:35 AM

Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini looks at the current track and forecast for another spring storm.

Those ready for spring weather likely won’t like this forecast.

Winter Storm Watch has been issued for Darke, Preble, Montgomery, Wayne, Randolph, Butler, Warren and Clinton counties from 2 a.m. Saturday through 2 a.m.Sunday. A Winter Storm Watch means conditions are favorable for impactful snow, sleet or ice that can make travel difficult. 

>> Winter Weather Awareness: What are the different types of Winter Weather Alerts?

>> Whio Weather App

A quick-moving low pressure system will spread moisture back into the Miami Valley Saturday and Saturday night, said Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini. A band of snow will be possible that, at times, might mix with rain. The system currently is favoring the southern and western half of the Miami Valley where the watch was issued. This means areas such as Logan, Shelby, Auglaize and Mercer counties could see a sharp cut-off from moisture and possibly very little, if any, snow. 

>> Winter Weather Awareness: What to have in your car kit

The track and intensity of this system is still in question, and fine-tuning will come together during the end of the work week. Counties under the Winter Storm Watch have the best chance to see sticking snow that will could be more than two inches. 

>> Severe Weather Alert Sign-up

A few factors that could limit impact in the Miami Valley: Warm road temperatures allowing for snow melt, snow falling during the day allowing for a mix with rain, the track shifting and pulling the accumulating snow further south.

A few factors that could increase impact in the Miami Valley: Staying colder than expected, a shift further north could spread more snow across the entire area and the intensity of the system. 

Stay with Storm Center 7 for the latest updates to this spring snow storm.

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Dayton’s Fire Blocks faces deadline, could lose $4.5M in funds

Published: Thursday, March 22, 2018 @ 7:10 AM

            Workers replace street lights near the Elks Building near the intersection of South Jefferson and East Third Street in the Fire Blocks District in downtown Dayton. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF
Workers replace street lights near the Elks Building near the intersection of South Jefferson and East Third Street in the Fire Blocks District in downtown Dayton. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

The state of Ohio has told the group that wants to redevelop the Fire Blocks District that it has until June 30 to prove it has financing for the project or its tax credits may be rescinded.

The Ellway Group won nearly $4.5 million in state historic preservation tax credits in June 2016 to help fund the restoration of the Elks Building and the Huffman Block building on the 100 block of East Third Street.

RELATED: Photos: A look inside downtown Dayton’s Fire Blocks District

The development group’s $23 million plan was to create new housing and first-floor retail and restaurant spaces in the mostly vacant buildings.

But this month, the Ohio Development Services Agency sent a letter to Ellway Group CEO Winfield Scott Gibson saying his project has not demonstrated “sufficient evidence of reviewable progress” because the has not closed on financing, according to a copy of the letter obtained by this newspaper through a public records request.

Tax credit recipients risk losing their awards if they fail to show after 18 months that they have secured financing for their proposed rehab projects and have not commenced construction. It’s been about 21 months since the project received its award.

RELATED: Fire Blocks plan to reshape downtown Dayton faces growing pains

Last month, Gibson sent the state a letter asking to push back the project’s end date until March 31, 2019, saying there were delays related to finding a tax credit investor and securing financing, according to records obtained by this newspaper.

Tax credit recipients must file a 12- or 18-month progress report on their projects with the state.

In the letter, Gibson said project construction financing is expected to close in June and construction should begin on May 1. The state agreed to a short time extension to allow the Ellway Group to secure financing and start construction.

RELATED: 5 things to know about Fire Blocks’ $100 million proposal

But if that does not happen by the end of June, the Ohio Development Services Agency said it may rescind the approved tax credits and give them away to other projects in upcoming funding rounds.

Gibson told this newspaper that it’s “going to be tight” but he believes his group will close on financing in time to meet the deadline. He also said he has a back-up plan if the project were to lose its state historic tax credits and had to be scrapped — but he says he really hopes it does not come to that.

“The plan is the plan and we’re moving forward,” he said.

The district covers multiple blocks but centers around the 100 block of East Third Street. Companies controlled by Gibson or the Ellway Group own about nine buildings in and around downtown Dayton.

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Clayton, three other local communities purchase new warning sirens

Published: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 @ 6:47 PM

            Clayton, Clay Township, Trotwood and Englewood invest about $108,000, along with about $108,000 grant from the Department of Homeland Security for new sirens. STAFF PHOTOS.
Clayton, Clay Township, Trotwood and Englewood invest about $108,000, along with about $108,000 grant from the Department of Homeland Security for new sirens. STAFF PHOTOS.

Nine new warning sirens are being installed in and around the Northmont community, a partnership of four local governments designed to keep residents safe in an emergency.

The new sirens will help alert more people in Clayton, Englewood, Trotwood and Clay Township, the four governments that partnered on the project.

MORE: Gun control advocates push for ‘red flag’ law in Ohio

The sirens will be placed strategically throughout the region to warn residents of severe weather conditions.

The sirens were purchased by Montgomery County and then sold to the partnering agencies. The Department of Homeland Security and the four local governments involved split the costs.

The sirens will be put in places to provide maximum coverage but so they do not overlap. The city of Clayton added three to the city.

Residents can sign up for Clayton’s notification system to receive alerts for tornadoes and emergency warnings. Residents also can use a weather radio or tune into WHIO-TV and WHIO-Radio, or download the WHIO app, for updated weather alerts.

TRENDING: Dayton officer disciplined for investigation involving child who later died

For more information on the new sirens, contact the Clayton Director of Development Jack Kuntz at (937) 836-3500.

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Two hospitalized after police pursuit ends in crash in Dayton

Published: Thursday, March 22, 2018 @ 2:14 AM

I-75 Pursuit

UPDATE @ 2:50 a.m: Two people were hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries after a police pursuit ended in a crash on Needmore Road early Thursday morning.

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: 3 critical, 1 dead on U.S. 36 crash in Champaign County

According to officials, they attempted to conduct a traffic stop on Stanley Avenue around 1:45 a.m., the suspect did not comply and a pursuit started on northbound I-75. 

The suspect ended up crashing into another vehicle after running a red light on Needmore Road not too long after the pursuit ensued. 

The suspect and the driver of the other vehicle were the individuals transported to Grandview Medical Center.

Officials did find a loaded handgun and narcotics in the suspect vehicle. 

The individual was placed under arrest and will be taken to Montgomery County Jail after their release from the hospital. 


A pursuit on northbound I-75 ended as a crash on the Needmore Road exit ramp early Thursday morning.

According to officials, the pursuit started around 1:45 a.m. at the 55 milemarker.

The Ohio Highway State Patrol are handling with assistance from Dayton police.

We will continue to update this story with more details. 

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