Bagley, No. 5 Duke rout Notre Dame 88-70 in ACC tourney

Published: Thursday, March 08, 2018 @ 9:30 PM
Updated: Thursday, March 08, 2018 @ 9:29 PM

            Duke guard Trevon Duval (1) goes up to dunk against Notre Dame guard Matt Farrell (5) during the second half during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in the Atlantic Coast Conference men's tournament Thursday, March 8, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
Duke guard Trevon Duval (1) goes up to dunk against Notre Dame guard Matt Farrell (5) during the second half during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in the Atlantic Coast Conference men's tournament Thursday, March 8, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

Marvin Bagley III and No. 5 Duke jumped right over Notre Dame into the Atlantic Coast Conference semifinals.

The freshman phenom had 33 points and 17 rebounds, Grayson Allen made his first five 3-pointers and Duke rolled to an 88-70 victory in the tournament quarterfinals Thursday night.

"Bagley was just ... the first pick in the draft," Notre Dame coach Mike Brey said. "He's a can't-miss star."

Allen finished with 23 points and the second-seeded Blue Devils (26-6) advanced to play archrival North Carolina in the second semifinal Friday night. The 12th-ranked and sixth-seeded Tar Heels eliminated No. 3 seed Miami, 82-65.

Duke, the defending champion after beating Notre Dame in the title game last year, earned its 100th ACC Tournament victory.

"We're on a roll," Bagley said. "I definitely think we're getting better."

Bonzie Colson had 18 points and nine rebounds for the 10th-seeded Fighting Irish (20-14), unable to score the marquee victory over a top team that would have been a huge boost to their NCAA Tournament resume.

Injuries to Colson and senior guard Matt Farrell derailed Notre Dame in the middle of the season, and now the Irish have to hope the selection committee focuses on how good they can be when healthy.

"I'm definitely going to go to church on Sunday morning," Farrell said.

The undersized Fighting Irish had no answer for Bagley's athleticism and rare leaping ability in the lane at 6-foot-11. The ACC Player of the Year shot 15 for 23 and came within one point of his career high set against Texas in late November. It was his fourth game with at least 30 points and 15 rebounds.

"He's one of the toughest players I've ever gone against. He's really explosive," Colson said. "He deserved all the honors he got this year."

Trevon Duval dished out 11 assists for the Blue Devils, who overcame foul trouble for big man Wendell Carter Jr. that limited him to four points in 17 minutes.

Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski said Carter has a foot injury that kept him out of practice this week.

"He played gingerly tonight, and we'll see about tomorrow," Krzyzewski said.

When the Irish lost 88-66 at Duke in late January during a seven-game skid, Colson and Farrell were both out. So they had good reason to believe this matchup could be much different.

The game began at a blistering pace, with both teams zooming up and down the court. They combined to go 8 for 13 on 3-pointers and Duke already had a 25-17 lead before the first timeout 7:18 in. Allen was 4 for 4 from outside the arc at that point, hitting three straight 3s before Brey called a timeout.

With the Irish playing their third game in three days, this one against a rested Duke squad that had been off since beating rival North Carolina on Saturday night, the fast start seemed to favor the Blue Devils as they built a 13-point advantage midway through the first half.

"We started pushing the ball early and got some good looks," Allen said.

But the Irish trimmed it to 41-37 at halftime — despite Allen's 17 points — and quickly got within two 40 seconds into the second.

That's when Duke took control as Bagley and Duval combined for 10 points in a 12-2 spurt that gave the Blue Devils a 53-41 cushion.

Duke extended it to 80-62 with 4:30 remaining, and there would be no big rally for the Fighting Irish this time. Notre Dame won its first two games in the tournament, erasing a 21-point deficit in the second half Wednesday night against Virginia Tech for the biggest comeback in school history.


Notre Dame: Hard to know how the committee will evaluate a team that went 14-5 with Colson and 6-9 without him. Farrell also missed several games during Colson's absence with an injured ankle. Brey said Wednesday he has a top-20 team with his stars healthy and it deserves a spot in the field of 68.

"I hope they get in. I think they can beat anybody," Krzyzewski said. "Mike has that team together all year, forget it."

Notre Dame opened 13-3 and was ranked No. 5 in the country in late November after beating then-No. 6 Wichita State to win the Maui Invitational. Now, the Irish must hope they did enough with Colson and Farrell in the lineup to impress the committee. If not, Notre Dame could be a favorite to win the NIT.

"Our guys emptied the tank," Brey said. "No matter what happens, we'll be accepting and proud."

Duke: With a chance to earn a No. 1 seed in the NCAAs, the Blue Devils are looking for their second consecutive ACC Tournament championship. They already have a record 20. ... Duke improved to 100-44 in the ACC Tournament, including 62-22 with 14 championships in 38 appearances under Coach K. ... Since switching primarily to a 2-3 zone defense, an uncharacteristic move for Krzyzewski, the Blue Devils have won seven of eight. Before that they had dropped three of four. "We're just growing. We're still learning," Krzyzewski said.


Duke is 7-0 at Barclays Center, including last year's unprecedented four-game run to win the first ACC Tournament held in Brooklyn. Notre Dame dropped to 9-3 at Barclays.


Duke has won six straight against North Carolina in the ACC Tournament since the Tar Heels took the 1998 championship game.


Notre Dame: On the bubble, and a big story, when Selection Sunday rolls around.

Duke: A semifinal matchup with North Carolina for the second year in a row. Last season, the Blue Devils won 93-83 to improve to 13-8 against the Tar Heels at the ACC Tournament. UNC rebounded to win the national championship, though. The schools split their two regular-season meetings this year, with each winning at home — including Duke's 74-64 comeback victory last Saturday night.


More AP college basketball: and

Trending - Most Read Stories

Congress OKs $450,000 for Wright brothers factory buildings

Published: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 6:28 PM

            Wright Airplane Factory buildings were occupied by Delphi until 2009. TY GREENLEES / STAFF FILE PHOTO
            Ty Greenlees
Wright Airplane Factory buildings were occupied by Delphi until 2009. TY GREENLEES / STAFF FILE PHOTO(Ty Greenlees)

The National Park Service will have $450,000 to buy two historic buildings at the former Wright Co. airplane factory site in West Dayton under a $1.3 trillion federal omnibus spending bill President Donald Trump signed Friday.

But the years-long quest to buy buildings 1 and 2, the first factory in the world to produce airplanes, is anything but over, officials say.

“It’s a small, positive step in a long, difficult march,” said Timothy Gaffney, a National Aviation Heritage Alliance spokesman.

The Park Service and the National Aviation Heritage Alliance have longed eyed the buildings in the hope the public would be able to see the site as part of the Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park.

RELATED: Alliance in talks for Wright factory

Kendell Thompson, the parks’ acting superintendent, said Friday he was waiting to determine what the next step is in the process.

The historic buildings are part of a 54-acre parcel, site of the former Delphi Home Avenue plant, that has been put on the commercial market. The historic site at 2701 Home Ave. is between U.S. 35 and West Third Street near Abbey Avenue.

A previous plan to buy the entire site was scaled back, according to Tony Sculimbrene, executive director of the National Aviation Heritage Alliance, who has spent years in negotiations on the future of the historic location.

The complexity of negotiations has been complicated by former owner Delphi’s past bankruptcy, land covenants and environmental liability concerns, Sculimbrene said. Former auto parts production buildings were demolished and the site has been environmentally investigated and remediated under a $3 million Clean Ohio grant, officials said.

RELATED: Rare Wright brothers propeller headed from Dayton to Colorado museum

Hull & Associates/Home Avenue Redevelopment LLC purchased the site in 2012 with the intent to remediate environmental issues and sell it. The property is for sale on the commercial market.

Brad White, a managing partner of Home Avenue Redevelopment LLC, said the $450,000 appropriation was “good news” because the intent over the years was to sell the historic buildings to the National Park Service.

David Lotterer, vice president of commercial real estate broker JLL, which is marketing the property, declined comment Friday.

While the park service has eyed the two historic buildings, Dayton Metro Library plans to build a $10 million branch library on about seven and a half acres on the site have stalled because officials have not been able to reach a deal, the Dayton Daily News reported this month.

Dayton Metro Library executive director Tim Kambitsch said earlier this month the library did not want to move to the site on its own because of concerns incompatible uses might move in nearby, and it did not want to pay more than the property was valued.

RELATED: Backers want Ohio Aviation Hall of Fame at future monument site

NAHA’s long-term vision of the property would bring commercial and “complimentary” industrial redevelopment, such as advanced manufacturing, to the former factory site, Gaffney said.

Orville and Wilbur Wright’s airplane factory built 100 airplanes between 1910-1911. General Motors and later Delphi acquired the property, and built new factories to manufacture auto parts for decades. The Delphi plant was demolished in 2013.

Trending - Most Read Stories

False alarm sends police to Troy Christian Elementary

Published: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 1:34 PM

Panic alarm pushed accidentally causing school to go into lockdown Friday afternoon.

A false emergency alarm prompted police to respond to Troy Christian Elementary school, police said.

Officers responded to the school around 1 p.m. and the school was placed on lockdown while police searched the building.

>> Team seeks airmen to help with uniform design improvements

Police said 16 officers responded.

The emergency alarm button was pressed unintentionally and there is an investigation underway to determine who pressed the button, police said.

>> Car crashes into Bellefontaine store

Nothing was found and the school has resumed to normal operation, police said.

The school already was scheduled to dismiss early at 1 p.m.

Got a tip? Call our 24-hour monitored line, 937-259-2237, or send it to

Trending - Most Read Stories

Did you know that Dayton once had a UNICORN bar?

Published: Thursday, March 22, 2018 @ 6:00 AM

This photo is not from the Unicorn Restaurant and Lounge, but we can image.
Source: Shutterstock
This photo is not from the Unicorn Restaurant and Lounge, but we can image.(Source: Shutterstock)

Yaaaas, my mystical queen and kings, what you’ve heard is true. 

Downtown Dayton DID have an unicorn bar

>> What are the oldest bars in Dayton?

But as co-owner of the Century bar Diane Spitzig remembers, the Unicorn Restaurant and Lounge wasn’t exactly firing rainbows from where the sun don’t shine. 

>> Future downtown speakeasy’s name pulls from Dayton history



>> Daytonians of the Week: Meet the duo whose love for craft beer led them to this popular downtown Dayton bar

“It was just a bar,” she recalled. 

The small corner bar was at 100 E. Third St. next to the Century in what has been rebranded downtown Dayton’s Fire Blocks District

>> 8 classic local restaurants that we miss

From what we can tell from a search of state records, it was incorporated in 1984 as Unicorn Lounge. 

Its official closing date is listed as March 9, 2004. 

>> PHOTO SNEAK PEEK: Take a look inside Devil Wind, the area’s newest brewery

The name at least was ahead of its time, as unicorns are all the rage these days. 

Local resident and musician Aarika Voegele hung out at the bar with her brother. 

>> Best of Dayton 2017 Winners: Food & Dining

“They were always real nice,” she responded on Facebook. “I remember a wooden bar that stretched (through) the place, and it being somewhat packed with regulars. If I remember correctly, there was a jukebox towards the back. It was a very mellow bar, from my experience.”

>> 6 international food markets in Dayton you HAVE to try

As some recalled, the bar owned by John Demetriades had a neon unicorn head in its window.

>> This Dayton restaurant’s GINORMOUS sandwich will blow your mind

Little evidence of the Unicorn could be found in the Dayton Daily News archives. 

Articles uncovered point to difficult times in the Unicorn’s final years.

A 1999 story involved two brothers attacking a bartender. 

In an a 2002 article about the city’s objections to the renewal of its liquor permit and those of about a dozen other businesses, it was reported that the Unicorn’s owner insisted that crimes around the bar were unrelated to the business. 

>> Where to eat Easter brunch and dinner in Dayton 

The space that formerly held the Unicorn was the site of the Dayton Circus art event in 2009.

Since there is no Unicorn for us to visit today, we can only imagine the shenanigans that could be going down there at this very moment.

The Unicorn Restaurant and Lounge was closed long before this photo was taken, but we have our imaginations.(Photo source: Shutterstock)

The Unicorn Restaurant and Lounge was closed long before this photo was taken, but we have our imaginations.(Photo source: Shutterstock)

This photo is not from the Unicorn Restaurant and Lounge, but we can image.(Source: Shutterstock)

Trending - Most Read Stories

Car crashes into Bellefontaine food store

Published: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 4:08 PM


A car crashed into the Au Natural Health Food store on South Main Street this afternoon.

Officers responded to the business around 3 p.m. after the car crashed through the front of the building, shattering glass.

Police were unable to provide any initial details on what caused the crash or if any injuries were reported.

Trending - Most Read Stories