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Arrest made during OVI checkpoint in Logan County

Published: Monday, June 19, 2017 @ 6:55 PM

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A driver was arrested for OVI and another cited for having an open container of alcohol during an OVI checkpoint in Logan County Friday night.

847 cars passed through the four hour checkpoint at Main Street and Lake Avenue in Bellefontaine, according to a release from the Ohio State Highway Patrol. 

Crash statistics for the past three years indicate there have been a total of 64 alcohol-related crashes within a three mile radius of the checkpoint's location. 

According to the release, of those 64 crashes, 3 included fatalities and another 20 involved injuries. 

Officers from the Marysville post of the OSHP, Bellefontaine Police Department and the Logan County Sheriff's Office combined efforts for the traffic stops.

GOT A TIP? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

$86M overhaul planned to Dayton public housing high-rises, apartments

Published: Friday, June 23, 2017 @ 8:26 AM


            The Westdale high-rise is expected to be rehabbed and improved. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

Dayton’s public housing authority plans to offer 669 apartments it owns and operates to private investors to help fund tens of millions of dollars in renovations to modernize the housing.

Greater Dayton Premier Management, the largest provider of affordable housing in Montgomery County, has 73 housing sites, and the average age of its apartments is 40 years old.

The physical needs of all of GDPM’s properties exceed $134 million, while the agency receives about $5 million annually for capital improvement projects, said Jennifer Heapy, the agency’s CEO.

The federal government has authorized GDPM to convert a handful of high-rises and a variety of smaller apartment buildings it owns into the project-based Section 8 housing program.

RELATED: Public housing targeted for demolition, upgrades

Private investors and tax credits will help fund updating or replacing the housing, the estimated redevelopment costs of which exceeds $85 million, according to the GDPM.

“This (program) is really reflective of HUD wanting to get out of ownership of public housing,” said Heapy.

Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) granted GDPM approval to participate in its Rental Assistance Demonstration program.

Under the program, GDPM can move some of its properties over into the Section 8 program, which provides people with vouchers, or payments, to live in privately owned housing.

The conversions will allow private capital to fund renovating or replacing public housing, which will benefit from tax credits to help provide subsidized rent to tenants, officials said.

MORE: Public housing residents to get employment help

Conversion is important because GDPM does not have the money to pay to update and renovate its buildings, officials said.

An assessment completed in 2011 concluded modernizing all of GDPM’s properties would cost $134 million.

The agency is waiting for a new physical-needs assessment to be completed to determine if the buildings it wants to convert to the private marketplace should be renovated or demolished and replaced.

MORE: Locations of Dayton’s affordable housing criticized

The first phase targets three high rises: The Metropolitan in the Grafton Hill area (77 apartments), the Wentworth in northwest Dayton (147 units) and the Westdale apartments on the west side (57 units).

The first phase will have an estimated development cost of $35 million.

Phase 2 right now includes the Wilkinson plaza high-rise, located downtown on the 100 block of West Fifth Street.

The building, which likely needs to be demolished, has 199 units and may be put into the first phase, Heapy said.

Other housing in the second phase include the Westdale cottages near the high-rise of the same name and a variety of scattered sites across the city.

The third phase, expected for 2020 to 2022, would likely demolish and replace the Hallmark Meridian, which has 75 units and is across the street from the Metropolitan.

The second and third phases have estimated development costs of $39.4 million and $11.2 million, respectively.

GDPM owns and operates about 2,680 housing units, and the current waiting list for public housing is 1,855.

The agency also provides nearly 4,100 people with housing vouchers, which are payments they can use to rent from operators of private housing. GDPM spends about $22 million on its voucher program, which has a waiting list of 4,620

After these three phases wrap up, GDPM is interested in transferring more of its properties through the program, Heapy said.

Touch-A-Truck event in West Chester cancelled due to weather

Published: Wednesday, June 21, 2017 @ 10:13 AM
Updated: Friday, June 23, 2017 @ 10:06 AM


            Fire trucks, police vehicles, snow plows, military vehicles, helicopters, rescue boats and more will line the streets June 23 near The Square @ Union Centre, 9285 Centre Pointe Drive. The free Touch-A-Truck event runs from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Pictured are children at previous Touch-A-Truck events. GREG LYNCH / STAFF

UPDATE, June 23: The Touch-A-Truck event today in West Chester has been canceled due to weather, according to township officials.

MORE: Flood advisory, flash flood watch issued as Cindy brings showers/storms

No makeup date has been announced.

INITIAL REPORT, June 21:

On Friday, June 23, West Chester Twp. is flinging open its garage doors to share all of the trucks and vehicles that serve the community every day.

Fire trucks, police vehicles, snow plows, military vehicles, helicopters, rescue boats and more will line the streets near The Square @ Union Centre, 9285 Centre Pointe Drive.

MORE: Find local events and things to do this weekend

The free Touch-A-Truck event runs from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Children are invited to climb behind the wheel, sit in the shovel of the backhoe and speak with the men and women operating the equipment essential to community operations.

Businesses may face penalties for prohibiting guns in private vehicles

Published: Thursday, June 22, 2017 @ 6:32 PM
Updated: Thursday, June 22, 2017 @ 6:32 PM

Businesses may face penalties for prohibiting guns in private vehicles (Photo credit should read GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)

Business groups are fighting an Ohio Senate proposal that will open them up to civil lawsuits by employees and others who bring handguns on to company property.

“For us this isn’t a concealed carry issue as much as this is an employer rights issue,” said Chris Kershner, vice president, public policy & economic development for the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce.

“Employers should be able to manage the actions in their private business on their private property, period.”

Ohio’s newly expanded concealed carry law - passed in December as Senate Bill 199 - lets people with concealed carry permits bring their guns onto private property regardless of the policies and wishes of the company or property owner.

RELATED: Guns at work: New law allows handguns on private property 

The gun must remain stored in the permit holder’s private vehicle.

But the law did not include any penalties for companies that do not comply and gun rights advocates have called for teeth to be added to it.

RELATED: Guns at work: New law allows handguns on private property

A provision in the Ohio Senate’s version of the proposed state budget would do that by creating a civil liability for employers and property owners if they try to prevent concealed-carry permit holders from bringing their guns onto private property.

John Fortney, spokesman for Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof, R-Medina, said the new provision is needed to concealed-carry permit holders who are following the rules don’t face unfair discipline at work.

“It doesn’t make sense for someone to lose their job for being responsible and following the law,” Fortney said.

The provision has prompted the Ohio Chamber of Commerce and 17 other business groups to send a letter strongly opposing the new provision to Obhof and Ohio House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger, R-Clarksville.

The letter is signed by groups representing retailers, manufacturers, contractors, auto dealers, financial service and insurance companies, attorneys, and other businesses 

“We were opposed to Senate Bill 199 last year,” said Don Boyd, director of labor and legal affairs for the Ohio Chamber of Commerce. “We believed it infringes on employers’ private property rights and everyone’s private property rights. It also applies to every property owner and business owner in the state.”

RELATED: do concealed-carry laws make us safer?

Boyd said the business groups hope the provision will be removed in the final version of the state’s two-year budget that is being discussed now in a 6-member conference committee made up of members of the Ohio Senate and House of Representatives. The House version of the state budget does not include the provision.

“Looking at this new amendment we think it just exacerbates the problems of 199 by creating a new way to file a lawsuit against employers and private property owners,” Boyd said. “It’s a step backward for Ohio’s legal climate.”

The Senate provision would allow the business or property owner to be sued in civil court and the plaintiff awarded compensatory damages, injunctive relief, costs and attorney’s fees.

A lawsuit could be filed against a property owner, or employer “who establishes, maintains, or enforces a policy that prohibits a valid concealed handgun licensee from transporting or storing a firearm or ammunition in the person’s privately owned motor vehicle in accordance with existing law conditions,” according to a summary of the budget provision by the state’s non-partisan Legislative Service Commission.

RELATED: 5 things to know about Ohio’s CCW law

“Penalties are needed because some businesses have refused to comply with the spirit of the law,” said Jim Irvine, chairman of the Buckeye Firearms Association.

He said some employers are “harassing” employees who bring guns to work in their cars by asking them to come forward and show proof of a concealed carry permit and gun safety training.

RELATED: Hundreds killed by guns in workplace

The State Legislature in December approved the concealed carry expansion in a flurry of late night lame duck voting.

RELATED: Gun restrictions ease in Ohio

The law overrides company policies regarding weapons on company property but does not require a business to let people bring guns inside the business.

It was opposed by gun safety advocates and business groups but supported by gun rights advocates who said it allows people to have their weapons with them if they need to defend themselves on the way to and from work.

The concealed carry law originally would have established concealed carry holders as a protected class under civil rights laws but that was removed after businesses objected.

RELATED: Business groups lament Ohio expanded gun laws

The law does not apply to federal facilities like post offices or Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

RELATED: Wright-Patt employees can’t bring handguns to work

The law does let colleges, universities, and local government officials allow concealed carry permit holders to bring guns onto their property. Kershner said private businesses should have given private property owners and businesses the same right to choose to keep guns out.

“This is about employers being able to operate with less government interference,” Kershner said.

RELATED: Residents respond to new law allowing guns on private property

RELATED: 5 things to know about Ohio’s CCW law

RELATED: 9 Workplace Shooting incidents in Ohio and the U.S.

RELATED: Tips to avoid gun violence at work

JOBS: Kroger to host hiring event

Published: Friday, June 23, 2017 @ 9:08 AM

FILE PHOTO
Dana Zechar

Kroger is hiring for 800 open positions at all locations, including:

  • Deli/Bakery
  • Meat/Seafood
  • Starbucks
  • Grocery
  • ClickList

 RELATED: Kroger to expand online shopping to Dayton area locations

Apply online prior to attending the fair at jobs.kroger.com or apply at the hiring event.