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Wright Patt C-17s haul hundreds of tons of aid to hurricane survivors

Published: Thursday, September 21, 2017 @ 4:55 AM


            Crews off-load a pallet of hurricane relief items Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017 at Homestead Air Reserve Base, Fla. The flight began at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and traveled to four states. BARRIE BARBER/STAFF
Crews off-load a pallet of hurricane relief items Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017 at Homestead Air Reserve Base, Fla. The flight began at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and traveled to four states. BARRIE BARBER/STAFF

With hurricanes pummeling the U.S. Gulf Coast and the Caribbean, C-17 transport jets have lifted off at Wright-Patterson headed to disaster zones to drop off troops and hundreds of tons of relief aid.

The Air Force Reserve 445th Airlift Wing flew nearly 200 passengers and 332 tons of cargo on a total of five missions to Florida, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands after Hurricane Irma churned through the Atlantic and tore through the islands before slamming into Florida this month. Before the massive storm struck, a Wright-Patt C-17 Globemaster III picked up a helicopter in Florida and flew it to Georgia on another mission.

RELATED: Wright-Patt C-17 delivers relief aid to Florida after Hurricane Irma strikes

After Hurricane Harvey barreled into Texas and unleashed record rains that caused widespread flooding, displacing thousands, the wing flew three C-17 missions. The flights carried 130 passengers and 345 tons of cargo to the Lone Star state last month, according to Lt. Col. Cynthia Harris, wing spokeswoman.

The crews have hauled food, water, cots and equipment along with troops sent to the disaster zones.

“The relief efforts are actually going to take a while,” said Maj. Mike Shampine, a C-17 pilot and a 445th Airlift Wing flight operations officer at Wright-Patterson. “As more and more hurricanes (are) battering the area, we’re going to have to keep our resupply effort to get back up to speed.”

RELATED: Wright-Patt C-17 crew flies N.Y. rescue team to Puerto Rico after hurricane

The airlift wing is on standby for possibly more relief flights if needed after Hurricane Maria churned into Puerto Rico as a Category 4 storm Wednesday. The last flight was Monday.

“’We actually have crews standing by basically waiting on a call to launch on short notice,” said Master Sgt. Todd Gnat, who works to coordinate missions.

The wing has canceled training and shuffled plane schedules to respond to the demand. Gnat said.

PHOTOS: Wright-Patt mission to provide Hurricane Irma relief

Crew members have asked to be part of the relief flights since Hurricane Harvey targeted Texas, officials said.

“As soon as people saw the hurricane coming in there, a lot of people called in ahead of time to volunteer their efforts,” Shampine said.

The Dayton Daily News and WHIO-TV reported on one of the relief flights to Homestead Air Reserve Base, Fla., last week.

Trump signs defense bill; shutdown stlll looms next week

Published: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 @ 3:14 PM
Updated: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 @ 4:04 PM


            The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base BARRIE BARBER/STAFF
The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base BARRIE BARBER/STAFF

President Donald Trump signed a defense authorization bill into law Tuesday, but that doesn’t settle the prospect of a partial federal government shutdown Dec. 22.

The bill authorizes defense programs for 2018, many of which will impact Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, but reaching a funding deal that would pay for the programs has eluded lawmakers so far this year.

“A government shutdown still remains possible,” said Michael Gessel, vice president of federal programs at the Dayton Development Coalition.

Since the fiscal year began Oct. 1, Congress has passed stop gap measures to keep the federal government operating, but cap spending at last year’s levels.

RELATED: Lack of defense budget raising concerns at Wright-Patterson

Two top Wright-Patterson leaders have spoken out against the temporary spending measures recently because they say they have created budget uncertainty and prevented the Air Force from starting new programs and eroded readiness.

Moreover, without a final spending bill that lifts budget caps imposed under the decade-long Budget Control Act of 2011 —- also known as sequestration—baseline defense spending will be capped at $549 billion. Congress has passed a $700 billion defense authorization bill that includes $66 billion in additional contigeny funding not restricted by the budget caps.

Gessel said lawmakers have worked behind the scenes on the possibly of a two-year budget framework to prevent the threat of a government shutdown for at least another year. Disagreements over other issues, from immigration to taxes and domestic spending, have weighed on the budget talks.

But what the final deal will be remains uncertain.

“The congressional leaders have insisted that they want to avoid a shutdown and the Senate majority leader (Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.) has even promised there won’t be a shutdown,” Gessel said. “These are all good signs.”

Ohio lawmakers have added several provisions under the defense legislation that will impact Wright-Patterson.

Some of the provisions were put into place by U.S. Sens, Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio and Rob Portman, R-Ohio, or U.S. Reps. Mike Turner, R-Dayton, and Warren Davidson, R-Troy.

“This law represents hundreds of hours of bipartisan work to ensure our military is fully equipped to handle every threat it may face in the coming year and rebuild our readiness,” Turner said in a statement.

RELATED: General: Spending needed if you want to hire; fly B-52s until 2040

Among the provisions added:

• $6.8 million to build a fire station at Wright-Patterson.

• Preventing a defense production office at Wright-Patterson, which works to boost the domestic industrial base to meet defense needs, from moving to the Pentagon. The office has had roughly two dozen employees and has been at the Miami Valley base since 1987.

• Increases royalty payments to federal researchers who develop new innovations and technology, such as those at the Air Force Research Laboratory.

• Gives the military more flexibility to fund “minor” construction at laboratories, and to buy commercial off-the-shelf equipment for civil engineers.

• Urges more collaboration between the Federal Aviation Administration and the Defense Department to integrate drones into the national airspace system.

Turner co-introduced with U.S. Rep. Nikki Tsongas, D-Mass., the BE HEARD Act, to address issues related to military sexual assault. Both lawmakers are co-chairpersons of the Military Sexual Assault Caucus in the House.

The provision includes expanded training for military lawyers working with sexual assault victims; allowing the military’s highest court to hear victims’ appeals while a trial is ongoing; and permitting military judges to appoint legal representatives to sexual assault victims who are underage or cannot represent themselves prior to an alleged perpetrator facing charges, according to Turner’s office.

Turner also included a provision that prohibits the congressionally chartered National Aviation Hall of Fame, which is located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, from leaving the state of Ohio. NAHF officials have said recently they do not intend to relocate the hall of fame which is in the midst of a $5 million fund-raising campaign to update the center.

Retaliatory culture has not changed in military, ex-prosecutor says

Published: Monday, December 11, 2017 @ 4:35 PM


            In this May 15, 2017 file photo, Air Force Academy Cadets pass in review after Brig. Gen. Kristin Goodwin assumed command of the AFA cadet wing at a ceremony at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo.
In this May 15, 2017 file photo, Air Force Academy Cadets pass in review after Brig. Gen. Kristin Goodwin assumed command of the AFA cadet wing at a ceremony at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo.

Former female Air Force Academy cadets who withdrew after they said they faced retaliation when they reported they were sexually assaulted shows a need for a culture change throughout the military, a former prosecutor said.

“What it says about the climate is that despite all the military’s promise that they are taking this seriously and they are there to support survivors, the reality is that when a person is sexually assaulted in the military and then (reports it), whether they are at the academy or whether they are on active duty, the odds are that their career is going to be over,” said Don Christensen, president of the advocacy group Protect Our Defenders and a retired colonel who was a chief Air Force prosecutor.

“They’ll be subjected to pervasive retaliation both by their peers and by their superiors,” he said.

During a six-month investigation, CBS This Morning reported Monday it interviewed more than a dozen current or former cadets who said they faced retaliation after they reported sexual assaults to the academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Two of those interviewed Monday were women who were cadets but dropped out, and two current cadets whose identities were disguised. One of those interviewed said while she was subject to continued harassment after filing a report, her alleged attacker graduated at the prestigious school that produces Air Force officers.

Wright-Patterson assaults rise

Last month, the Defense Department released data for every major U.S. military installation in the world that showed Wright-Patterson Air Force Base had 30 reports of sexual assaults in 2016, nearly double the number from the previous two years. The Miami Valley base, which has an estimated 27,000 employees, recorded 17 assaults in both 2013 and 2014 and 19 cases in fiscal year 2013.

RELATED: Sexual assaults reported at Wright-Patt doubles in the past two years

The Defense Department data also showed the Air Force Academy had a higher number of sexual assaults than any other Air Force installation. The service academy had 44 reports in 2016, the Pentagon reported.

“Number one, they need to change the culture,” Christensen said. “This isn’t just the Air Force Academy, this is all the service academies.

“The military, as with anything they address (about) this issue, is more empty promises,” Christensen said. “On the one hand, they tell Congress that they’ve got it. On the other hand, behind the scenes, they support the people that have committed the rapes and force out the survivors.”

Meade Warthen, an Air Force Academy spokesman, told this outlet academy superintendent Lt. Gen. Jay B. Silveria’s would give a response to the investigation Tuesday on CBS This Morning. Warthen also sent this statement:

“What I can tell you in the interim, is that the Air Force Academy is deeply concerned by the allegations regarding the treatment of sexual assault victims at the Academy,” the statement said. “Dozens of professionals like Special Victims Counselors, Mental Health Professionals, Victim Advocates and more dedicate themselves day in and day out to the service of caring for the victims of this horrible crime. But the Academy is also focused on the root cause and believes creating and sustaining a climate of dignity and respect is absolutely essential to ending the scourge of sexual assault. One assault is too many and we will never rest until the number is zero.”

Retaliation complaints

Christensen cited a Department of Defense investigation that showed one in three women who have filed a sexual assault report leave the military within a year. Further, he said, about 60 percent of those who have said they experienced harassment or assault reported instances of retaliation since 2010.

RELATED: 32 sexual assaults reported at Wright-Patt AFB in 4-year period

“It’s not getting any better,” he said. “It’s probably getting worse and the retaliation is as bad as ever. The leadership knows about the retaliation and does nothing about it. That to me is their inability to speak out strongly and to hold people accountable. It sends a clear message to survivors, report at your own peril.”

In a statement last month, Wright-Patterson responded to the sharp increase in reported assaults.

“We cannot identify any significant trends in the increase,” spokeswoman Marie Vanover said in a Nov. 20 email. “While each case has its own unique attribute, the number is not indicative of the number of assaults that occurred at Wright-Patt. There are many factors that go into the numbers; including some cases accounting for more than one incident.

“We’re dedicated to fostering an environment of respect by standing against anyone who commits sexual assault and supporting survivors, whenever and wherever it may have occurred,” the statement said.

Christensen has said in his more than two decades of military judicial experience the “vast majority” of reported assaults occurred on or near the installation where they were first recorded.

2016 Air Force installation sex assault cases

U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo.: 44

Kadena Air Base, Japan: 37

Ramstein Air Base, Germany: 36

Travis Air Force Base, Calif: 34

Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.: 33

Wright-Patterson: 30

Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas and Nellis Air Force Base, Nev.: 27

Source: Department of Defense

A return of flying sergeants? Air Force says no despite too few pilots

Published: Monday, December 11, 2017 @ 5:00 AM

Could dual-track pilot careers save Air Force pilots?

The Air Force will launch a high-tech training experiment testing both officers and enlisted airmen to prepare pilots for the cockpit faster.

But, despite a growing shortage of aviators, it won’t be a return to the wartime days of flying sergeants – at least for now, according to the Air Force.

The six-month initiative at a military reserve center in Austin, Texas will reportedly include 15 commissioned officers, and five enlisted airmen who have recently graduated boot camp.

RELATED: Air Force facing growing crisis in pilot shortage

The initiative, dubbed “Pilot Training Next,” will use virtual and augmented reality, artificial intelligence, bio-metrics and data analytics to determine if aviators can be trained faster and cheaper using technology, an Air Force spokeswoman said in an interview.

The Air Education and Training Command’s latest training experiment, set to begin next February, is meant to find out if technology can help airmen of different educational backgrounds learn faster in the pilot-training pipeline, the Air Force said.

“We are going to use immersive technology to see how we can help people learn more effectively,” Lt. Col. Robert Vicars, Pilot Training Next director said in a statement. “This is an initiative to explore whether or not these technologies can help us learn deeper and faster.”

The Air Force, the Air National Guard and the Air Force Reserve, confront a shortage of about 2,000 aviators – and of that about 1,300 were fighter pilots. Many have been drawn out of the cockpit by an airline industry hiring binge or may have tired of a high number of deployments overseas.

RELATED: Wright Patt,defense firm, work to protect weapons from cyber threats

Training military pilots takes time and money: Two years of undergraduate fighter pilot training costs taxpayers more than $1 million for each aviator.

Still, despite the unusual move of including enlisted airmen in the experiment, they will not advance to undergraduate pilot training, according to Air Force spokeswoman Erika Yepsen.

For decades, the Air Force has reserved jobs for pilots to fly aircraft to commissioned officers who are college graduates.

However, to fill a gap of a shortage of aviators in wartime, enlisted pilots flew in World War I and World War II, historical documents show. Thousands flew in World War II alone, but still made up only about 1 percent of pilots, documents show.

RELATED: House defense leader at Wright Patt, says AF pilot shortage is growing

The Air Force has opened the door for enlisted troops in one area: Flying drones, which the service branch calls remotely piloted aircraft.

Since last year, the Air Force has trained enlisted airmen to fly the RQ-4 Global Hawk, a high-flying spy drone.

So far, 11 enlisted airmen have earned their wings as drone pilots, and that number could reach 100 by 2020, Yepsen said.

Kenneth E. Curell, 65, a former Air Force and Air National Guard fighter pilot who became an airline and corporate pilot, said in an email he did not believe enlisted airmen should be pilots of manned aircraft yet.

“If the objective is to proactively address pilot shortages, then the Air Force needs to experiment with and implement other options to entice prospective pilot candidates into the (Air Force) and promote initiatives that directly address areas pilots have identified as retention barriers,” the Centerville resident said. “Air Force leadership has not institutionally affected areas pilots perennially identify as retention barriers.”

Consequently, he added, pilots have “lost confidence” initiatives put in place to address the pilot shortage will stay beyond the next round of senior level leadership.

An F-22 Raptor demonstration pilot in the cockpit of the stealh figther before flying in the Vectren Dayton Air Show in 2008. TY GREENLEES/STAFF FILE PHOTO(Staff Writer)

Air Force Marathon chooses drone as ‘official’ aircraft of 2018 races

Published: Sunday, December 10, 2017 @ 10:13 AM


            The MQ-9 Reaper drone will be the “official” aircraft of the 2018 Air Force Marathon. CONTRIBUTED
The MQ-9 Reaper drone will be the “official” aircraft of the 2018 Air Force Marathon. CONTRIBUTED

The MQ-9 Reaper drone has been chosen as the “official” aircraft of the 2018 Air Force Marathon, a series of races that draw thousands of runners across the nation and other countries to the Miami Valley.

This marks the second time the Air Force has chosen an unmanned aerial vehicle as the aircraft for the contest.

RELATED: Hypersonic research could lead to future spy drone

In 2009, the MQ-4 Global Hawk, a reconnaissance drone, was the first, according to the Air Force.

The Air Force marathon has drawn more than 15,000 runners in recent years, who compete in full- and half-marathons, and a 10K race at Wright-Patterson and a 5K race at Wright State University.

RELATED; Drones, lasers, hypersonic weapons will be ‘game-changers’

The Reaper will be featured on runners’ medals and T-shirts. The marathon is scheduled for Sept. 15, 2018.