Springboro to unveil veterans memorial decades in the making

Published: Thursday, November 09, 2017 @ 10:01 AM

Springboro has a new veterans memorial in Gardner Park.

The long-anticipated formal dedication of the Springboro Veterans Memorial will be held on Saturday, Nov. 11, Veterans Day.

The dedication comes six months after it was originally planned and more than three decades after Springboro Mayor John Agenbroad and Eddie Lawson Jr., a local lawyer and veteran’s advocate, first pitched the idea.

RELATED: Springboro to get long-awaited memorial

The memorial is one of several new ones taking shape around the Miami Valley. Another was dedicated last November in Troy.

Agenbroad and Lawson first broached the idea in 1994 while on Springboro City Council.

Agenbroad, a veteran of the U.S. Marines, served in Vietnam and was awarded a Purple Heart.

An avid veterans advocate, Agenbroad has kept at the project, taken up by city staff, including recently retired City Manager Christine Thompson.

The design was funded with $9,100 donated in March 2016 by the Rotary Club of Springboro.

MORE: Troy veterans memorial dedicated outside library

The memorial was originally planned for North Park in Springboro, but moved to Gardner Park, 16 acres off North Main Street, Ohio 741 in Springboro.

Outdoor Enterprises of Casstown in Miami County was awarded the contract for the project.

Final laser imaging on the granite-wall monument was completed by Laser Imaging & Design in Lebanon.

“As the process unfolded, the city of Springboro wanted to get more and more involved,” owner Jim Smith said Thursday.

MORE: Why the NAACP wants Dayton voters to decide on traffic cameras

Plans for five military emblems morphed into the existing design, which features a continuous wall mural stretching 20 feet in length and 5 feet high. Panels tell the story of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard.

A second monument, a 9-foot tall, 6-sided monolith spelling out the stories of each branch, as well as the city itself, was added.

The memorial also includes walks and trees around a central plaza fashioned from stone, including imported granite.

Laser Imaging is also working on tree markers that will be placed by trees in memory of lost loved ones.

“It was an absolute pleasure working with the city of Springboro,” Smith said.

The Lebanon-based company has completed work on a series of veterans memorials, most recently the U.S. Navy Seal Memorial in Virginia Beach, Va.

Twice the Springboro unveiling was delayed while the contractors continued to work on the project.

Ceremonies planned on Memorial Day and Independence Day were postponed.

The total price tag is $228,078, including $13,400 in donations, according to city records.

Beginning at 11 a.m., there will be a presentation of the colors by the Military Order of the Purple Heart, police department, Clearcreek Fire District and ROTC Honor Guards, as well as a 21-gun salute.

Retired 3-star General Michael Zettler, a Springboro resident, is to make remarks. Local pastors Terry Carlisle and Wayne Mock will handle the invocation and benediction.

EARLIER: Memorial unveiling delayed in Springboro

Agenbroad will open the ceremony, the fruition of more than 30 years of work.

“I’m ecstatic,” Agenbroad. “I’m so proud.”

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Wright-Patt training exercise sets off booms

Published: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 3:22 PM


            Wright-Patterson Air Force Base
            STAFF/File
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base(STAFF/File)

If you heard a loud noise today at Wright-Patterson, it was all part of training, a base spokesman says.

The Dayton Daily News and News Center 7 were contacted by residents inquiring what was the cause of the explosion.

A Wright-Patterson Explosive Ordnance Disposal bomb squad was scheduled to set off three explosions between noon and 4 p.m. Wednesday, according to base spokesman Daryl Mayer.

The unit periodically sets off explosions in training which are often heard outside the base.

RELATED:Air Force Marathon tops list of ‘best’ fall marathons

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Work to start next month on $10.5 million Wright-Patt gateway

Published: Thursday, February 15, 2018 @ 5:30 PM


            Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Gate 16A, a commercial truck screening checkpoint, will be consolidated with a new Gate 26A in 2019 in a $10.5 million construction project. JIM WITMER | 2011 STAFF FILE PHOTO
            Jim Witmer
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Gate 16A, a commercial truck screening checkpoint, will be consolidated with a new Gate 26A in 2019 in a $10.5 million construction project. JIM WITMER | 2011 STAFF FILE PHOTO(Jim Witmer)

A new $10.5 million gateway that will consolidate two Wright-Patterson entrances into one is set to begin construction next month, a base spokesman says.

A new Gate 26A, a few hundred yards from the current one, would replace a commercial delivery entrance at Gate 16A off Ohio 444, and the existing Gate 26A off Ohio 235 near the entrance to the 445th Airlift Wing headquarters.

The new entrance way off Ohio 235 will be sited between Sandhill Road and Circle Drive, according to Wright-Patterson spokesman Daryl Mayer.

Work was scheduled for completion at the end of next year, the base said.

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AF museum opens, Wright-Patt workers head to work as shutdown ends

Published: Friday, February 09, 2018 @ 9:20 AM


            The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base BARRIE BARBER/STAFF
The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base BARRIE BARBER/STAFF

President Donald Trump has signed a two-year budget deal Friday that ended a government shutdown overnight Thursday, according to The Associated Press.

Wright-Patterson employees were told to report to work Friday despite a possible shutdown and had been in a holding pattern waiting for additional word until the president signed the legislation.

RELATED: Wright-Patt workers told to report to work Friday despite shutdown

Base spokesman Daryl Mayer said no orders had been issued to send civil service employees home and the base was awaiting official word the shutdown — which lasted less than nine hours — was over.

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, which closed after opening for four hours on the first day of a three-day shutdown last month, opened Friday morning as scheduled, according to spokeswoman Diana Bachert.

Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park locations at the Wright-Dunbar Interpretive Center in Dayton and Huffman Prairie Flying Field Interpretive Center near Wright-Patterson also were open.

RELATED: Threat of government shutdown wearing on workers

The partial federal government shutdown was the second in less than three weeks, the last occurring Jan.20-22.

Wright-Patterson sent home 8,600 Wright-Patterson civil service workers on a one-day work week furlough Monday, Jan. 22.

Overnight Thursday, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., took the floor of the Senate to decry the increase in debt spending, which delayed a vote on the two-year deal until after the midnight shutdown deadline.

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Wright-Patt workers told to report to work Friday despite shutdown

Published: Thursday, February 08, 2018 @ 6:44 PM
Updated: Friday, February 09, 2018 @ 5:42 AM

Wright-Patt workers told to report to work Friday even if government shuts down

UPDATE @5:40 a.m.

The House voted 240-186 to end a government shutdown.

The bill will now go to President Trump.

UPDATE @12:50 a.m.

The U.S. government was ordered to close at midnight.

Vice President Mike Pence said the Trump administration is “hopeful” the government shutdown will not last long.

>> The Latest: Budget office ordered U.S. government closed

FIRST REPORT

Wright-Patterson employees were told to show up for work Friday even if Congress fails to reach a budget agreement to avoid a shutdown at midnight Thursday, a base official said.

“We will follow the standard procedure that we did the last time” the base shuttered for a three-day partial federal government closure last month, said Marie Vanover, a base spokeswoman.

RELATED: Threat of government shutdown wearing on workers

Sen. Rand Paul is holding up a vote on the Senate budget deal, saying he can’t in “all good faith” move ahead with the deal without more debate.

The Kentucky Republican says he came to Congress to fight deficits. But now, he says, Republicans and Democrats are “spending us into oblivion.”

Lawmakers are facing a midnight deadline. The deal pending in the Senate must first pass the Senate, then the House and be signed into law to avoid a government shutdown. The deal appears to have the votes to pass, but rules of the Senate allow individual senators to hold up the process.

Could cause government to shutdown if deal not reached by midnight

Paul brushed off pleas from Senate leaders.

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says, “It’s time to vote.” Minority Leader Chuck Schumer says, “We’re in risky territory here.”

The shutdown that struck Jan. 20-22 sent about 8,600 base civil service employees home on a one-day work week furlough. Employees were required to report to work to receive notices.

All military personnel and some “essential” employee, such as police, firefighters and medical personnel ,also were required to work during the shutdown last month.

RELATED: Thousands head back to work at Wright-Patt as shutdown ends

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force opened for four hours on the first day of the shutdown before it received an order to close.

Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park sites, including the Wright-Dunbar Interpretive Center in Dayton and Huffman Prairie Flying Field Interpretive Center near Wright-Patterson, also temporarily shuttered.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

 

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