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Navy releases report on ship crashes that killed Ohio sailors, others

Published: Thursday, November 02, 2017 @ 3:53 PM
Updated: Thursday, November 02, 2017 @ 4:43 PM


            In a photo provided by the U.S. Navy, the USS John S. McCain, a U.S. guided-missile destroyer, with a hole in its rear left side, in waters off Singapore, Aug. 21, 2017. U.S. warships are designed to avoid detection by enemy fleets and aircraft, but this has proved deadly in crowded waters like those near Singapore. CONTRIBUTED
            SPC. JOSHUA FULTON
In a photo provided by the U.S. Navy, the USS John S. McCain, a U.S. guided-missile destroyer, with a hole in its rear left side, in waters off Singapore, Aug. 21, 2017. U.S. warships are designed to avoid detection by enemy fleets and aircraft, but this has proved deadly in crowded waters like those near Singapore. CONTRIBUTED(SPC. JOSHUA FULTON)

The Navy placed partial blame on ship collisions that killed 17 sailors aboard two U.S. warships at sea on “poor seamanship” and a “failure to follow safe navigational practices,” a U.S. Fleet Forces Command report released Thursday concluded.

The deadly collisions at sea with two commercial vessels involving the USS Fitzgerald in June and the USS John S. McCain in August, killed two Ohio sailors among those who died and wounded dozens of others.

RELATED: Ohio sailor among seven killed aboard USS Fitzgerald, US Navy says

Among those killed were Petty Officer 1st Class Gary Leo Rehm Jr., 37, of Elyria, aboard the Fitzgerald, and Petty Officer 2nd Class Jacob D. Drake, 21, of Champaign County, aboard the McCain.

RELATED: Navy sailor remembered as ‘great kid,’ steadfast friend

The Navy report concluded a degradation of watch team performance and an erosion of readiness, planning and safety practices contributed to the maritime crashes. Navy investigators added a “can-do” culture undermined basic watch standing and safety standards, the report said.

The investigation noted the demands of U.S warships stretched thin by commitments in the Western Pacific and the inadequacy of headquarters staff to identify and assess risks at sea.

The mishaps were among four reported involving U.S. warships in the Pacific this year, investigators noted.

Booz Allen Hamilton lands $14.7M AFRL deal for combat simulation

Published: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 @ 9:57 AM


            Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. TY GREENLEES / STAFF FILE PHOTO
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. TY GREENLEES / STAFF FILE PHOTO

A defense contractor has landed a $14.7 million deal to develop virtual combat modeling and simulation technologies, according to the Department of Defense.

The Air Force Research Laboratory awarded the five-year deal to McLean, Va.-based Booz Allen Hamilton, the Defense Department said. Three bidders were in contention for the contract.

RELATED: Wright Patt, defense firm work to protect weapons from cyber attack

The research will be conducted at both Wright-Patterson labs and in McLean, Va., the Defense Department said. AFRL has a worldwide workforce of more than 10,000 employees and is headquartered at Wright-Patterson.

Wright Patt, defense firm work to protect weapons from cyber threats

Published: Friday, November 17, 2017 @ 9:07 AM
Updated: Friday, November 17, 2017 @ 9:35 AM


            Air Force Research Laboratoy headquarters at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. TY GREENLEES / STAFF FILE PHOTO
Air Force Research Laboratoy headquarters at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. TY GREENLEES / STAFF FILE PHOTO

The Air Force Research Laboratory has awarded a $47.9 million contract to a defense contractor to explore ways to protect weapon systems from cyber attacks, according to the Department of Defense.

Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., which has an office in the Dayton region, will research the problem at Wright-Patterson, the Defense Department reported. The contract will expire in March 2023.

RELATED: General fears weapon systems not protected enough from cyber attacks

“… We’re not sure that we’re addressing all of the (cyber) vulnerabilities that we need to, so building that capability to look at all our weapon systems … across the board is paramount to us,” Lt. Gen. John F. Thompson, former Air Force Life Cycle Management Center commander, said in an October 2015 interview with this newspaper.

RELATED: New civilian AFRL leader led testing of ‘game-changing technologies’

In other contract news, AFRL recently awarded a $15 million contract to PC Krause and Associates of West Lafayette, Ind., to reduce the amount of time to develop thermal technologies through modeling and simulation, according to the Defense Department.

The research contract at Wright-Patterson is set to end in 2021.

Loud noise from fighter jets could be heard this week

Published: Monday, November 13, 2017 @ 1:10 PM


            STAFF FILE
STAFF FILE

F-16 fighter jets are set to launch through Ohio’s skies on night training missions this week.

The Ohio Air National Guard jets with the 180th Fighter Wing will launch Monday through Thursday during the training exercise, according to the Toledo-based unit.

RELATED: Russian surveillance jet flying out of Wright-Patterson

The flights are weather dependent and scheduled to concluded by 10 p.m. each day, the unit reported.

The Fighting Falcon jets periodically fly in the Dayton and Springfield region.

$115K in veterans scam funds seized goes to Honor Flight Dayton

Published: Saturday, November 11, 2017 @ 10:39 PM

VIDEO: Washington Twp. twin veterans among those on Honor Flight to D.C.

Honor Flight Dayton is one of several Oho veterans groups to be awarded grants from nearly $1 million seized from a veterans charity scam.

Ohio Attorney Gen. Mike DeWine announced the grants Saturday on Veterans Day.

“We worked hard to ensure this money would be used as originally intended -- to help veterans,” DeWine said.

>> Washington Twp. twins, World War II veterans among those on latest Honor Flight trip

“Bobby Thompson,” aka John Donald Cody, ran a scam charity called the U.S. Navy Veterans Association, collecting millions of dollars from donors nationwide. He was was convicted and sentenced in 2013 to 28 years in prison. Money seized was awarded to the Ohio Attorney General’s Office for distribution to legitimate veterans charities. 

Though the grants, each of Ohio’s five Honor Flight hubs -- Dayton, Cincinnati, Columbus, Cleveland and Findlay -- will receive $115,000 each. The program, founded in Dayton, takes veterans travel to their memorials in Washington, D.C.

>> Vandalia Pearl Harbor survivor celebrates belated 100th birthday at local VFW

Operation Legal Help Ohio will receive $100,000 to support its mission of connecting low-income Ohio veterans to free legal hope. The group also will receive $150,000 to support Ohio’s 20 veterans’ courts, funding transportation costs for veterans traveling to required appointments, according to DeWine’s office.

>> Local sheriff, police agencies tribute to veterans on social media

A $100,000 grand will go to Family and Community Services, DeWine’s office said, to fund repairs and appliances for a facility in Lorain that will provide housing for women veterans and their children. The facility will be called the Liberty House for Female Veterans and Families.

Also, the Ross County Veterans Council will receive $36,000 to help create a healing garden for veterans and their families at the Chillicothe VA Medical Center, and $10,000 was awarded to Toledo-based Heroes in Action, which supports service members and veterans across Ohio.

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