breaking news


Lab techs identify cultures to diagnose health conditions

Published: Friday, October 06, 2017 @ 10:36 AM


            Senior Airman Austin Shrewsbury, 88th Diagnostics and Therapeutic Squadron medical laboratory technician, left, works with student, Airman 1st Class Taylor Altman, 88th Diagnostics and Therapeutic Squadron medical laboratory technician, to identify bacteria of patient cultures inside the microbiology laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base medical center June 30. The lab technicians identify patient cultures ranging from throat, stools and urine to other cultures such as wounds and blood to diagnose health conditions in patients. (U.S. Air Force photo/Michelle Gigante)
Senior Airman Austin Shrewsbury, 88th Diagnostics and Therapeutic Squadron medical laboratory technician, left, works with student, Airman 1st Class Taylor Altman, 88th Diagnostics and Therapeutic Squadron medical laboratory technician, to identify bacteria of patient cultures inside the microbiology laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base medical center June 30. The lab technicians identify patient cultures ranging from throat, stools and urine to other cultures such as wounds and blood to diagnose health conditions in patients. (U.S. Air Force photo/Michelle Gigante)

They cannot be seen by the naked eye, they live in us and around us – zillions of these amazingly successful organisms, playing crucial roles in our bodies’ health. While some microbes help, others are known best for their role in human diseases.

In the microbe defense arsenal at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Medical Center are the 88th Diagnostics and Therapeutic microbiology laboratory technicians working to identify and diagnose infections.

http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/inaugural-expo-will-highlight-products-services/Wv9meHuoiEpuL2L7XmGBNJ/

Clinic physicians rely on the microbiology laboratory in the treatment of patients.

“They are very helpful in guiding antibiotic therapy and treating patients optimally,” said Maj. David Lindholm, an infectious disease physician in the 88th Medical Operations Squadron. “We are talking with microbiologists every day to hone in on what is causing infection.”

The 88 DTS microbiologist lab technicians perform diagnostic tests of patient samples and analyze cells underneath a microscope to determine what bacteria or microorganisms may be lurking within them.

“Initially you have to be able to recognize an organism’s characteristics on the agar plate and understand the conditions that it best grows in, to know the direction of testing to go,” said Erin Penney, 88 DTS microbiology technical supervisor.

The common types of microorganisms the team reviews range from throat, stools and urine to other cultures such as wounds and blood.

Once a swab sample has been taken from a patient it is sent to the lab to discern whether it is normal or pathogenic, which takes a great level of skill and practice.

“They give us insight on what’s going on, before we have the final results of the culture,” said Lindholm.

A microbial culture is a method of growing microbes in a predetermined medium under controlled laboratory settings.

While evaluating microbial organisms, the team uses its vast knowledge of the bacteria and other microbes normally found in the body to rule out if it is pathogenic.

The 88 DTS microbiology team has a new analyzer machine, which is proving instrumental to the microbiology lab team and saving time by helping identify the most effective treatment based on the offending microbe and area infected.

“For instance, there are certain drugs that can’t be turned out on certain body sites for certain microbes, and that’s because research will tell you that drug is not good in getting into that body site or maybe it’s not good at getting into that body site after that particular bacteria,” Penney said. “So, we want to make sure those types of drugs and microbe combinations are not relayed to the provider so they stay away from those drugs and they know which ones they should use for that particular site.”

Additionally, the 88 DTS microbiology lab team plays a role in the Department of Defense Flu Season Surveillance Program.

The specimen of any patient, whether admitted or seen in the emergency room, that has been diagnosed with the flu is submitted to the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine epidemiology lab.

The epidemiology lab studies that specimen to determine what strain of flu it is. The data is then sent to the Centers for Disease Control to do a routine surveillance of circulating flu strains for potential vaccine candidates.

With the upcoming flu season, it can be difficult for someone to tell if they have a bacterial or a viral infection.

“If you are feeling very ill, timing is of the essence,” said Penney. “Many folks will wait too long to see a physician, and the longer a bacteria is allowed to grow and develop, the more are released in the body.”

The efforts of the microbiology team at Wright-Patterson AFB can help. It works to get results in a timely manner.

“We know at the end of that, is a patient waiting to have the appropriate treatment, and I can’t say enough for the micro team; they are really passionate to find out what is causing someone to be ill and if they have questions, they are researching to find answers,” said Penney.

“My favorite part is I like seeing the results you can get; the more questions you ask, the more you learn,” said Shannon Heil, 88 DTS microbiology laboratory technician.

Red kettle campaign $10K short; Salvation Army issues public plea 

Published: Friday, December 15, 2017 @ 9:07 PM

The Salvation Army of Clark County is about $10,000 short on donations and needs help.

The Clark County Salvation Army is asking the community to check for loose change in couch cushions and car seats to help make up for the nearly $10,000 shortfall in its red kettle fundraiser.

“It’s one of the most recognizable fundraisers in the world,” Development Director Ryan Ray said of the campaign in its 127th year.

>> Middletown father of 9: ‘We are blessed’ as police deliver community’s donations

In an era when people pay with smartphones and often don’t carry cash or coins, Ray said he wants community members who see a red kettle to know what it represents.

“Lives are positively affected and enriched by your money. We promise and guarantee the money given is used to the best of our ability; 83 cents of every dollar given to us is invested in lives in the community to help those falling through the cracks,” Ray said.

>> It’s official: Ohio Issue 2 most expensive state campaign ever

Utility, housing and food assistance, programs for at-risk youth and helping those in homeless shelters get back on their feet are among ways the Salvation Army reaches out.

“Here in Clark County, people oftentimes see our kettles as hope. A lot of bell ringers have seen help from the Salvation Army and they want to give back,” Ray said.

>> Toys collected in remembrance of slain Butler County toddler

Bell ringers are paid minimum wage, but it often can be difficult to staff the kettles. Many are likely put off by the cold weather.

“The ones you see out there are warriors. ... “One of the all-star bell ringers is at Walmart on Bechtle,” who often dances and sings as he's out ringing the bell and wishing shoppers a Merry Christmas.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com.

Boil advisory now in effect after water main break on Heincke Road, Miamisburg

Published: Friday, December 15, 2017 @ 7:44 PM
Updated: Friday, December 15, 2017 @ 9:01 PM

Miamisburg water main break

UPDATE @ 7:51 p.m.: The break has been repaired and service should be restored shortly, city PIO Gary Giles said.

INITIAL REPORT

A water main break on North Heincke Road, near Mary Francis Court, in Miamisburg has caused more than 200 homes and apartments to lose water service, city Public Information Office Gary Giles said. 

In a statement release minutes ago, those in affected residences will get a door hanger notice advising of a boil water advisory, which will be in effect at least 24 hours. Repair crews are on site. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Changes at Dayton International Airport this year

A second door hanger notice will be delivered when the advisory expires. 

Heincke Road has not been closed to traffic, Giles said. 

We'll update this developing report as information becomes available. 

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com.

Women happier after age 85 once spouse dies, psychiatrists say

Published: Friday, December 15, 2017 @ 9:04 PM



Pixabay
(Pixabay)

Marriage is supposed to lead to happily ever after, right? A new report reveals women over 85 are actually happier after their partner dies.

>> Read more trending news 

The Health Survey for England recently conducted a study to monitor trends in the nation’s health. To do so, researchers surveyed 8,000 British adults to ask them questions about topics, including happiness, depression, anxiety, sleep disturbance and self-confidence.

After analyzing the results, they found that women have poorer mental health than men throughout much of their lives. 

About 28 percent of women aged 16 to 24 reported mental health conditions, compared to just 16 percent of men. The percentage, however, decreases for young adult women. About 18 percent of both men and women between 25 and 34 said they had mental health issues. 

>> Related: Study: Scientists can reverse aging cells to make humans younger

It dwindles again for middle-aged women. Of those 45 to 54, 24 percent of women experienced mental health problems, compared to only 16 to 18 percent of men. And by the time people reached 85 and over, it dropped to 14 percent for women and spiked to 19 percent for men. 

Why is that? 

Women “are still more likely to bear the brunt of domestic and caring responsibilities,” Kate Lovett, the dean of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, told The Times. But as they age, they tend to have fewer obligations.

“Men who are single, windowed or divorced are more vulnerable to developing depression and men who are in this age bracket may be more likely to be on their own,” she said. “Paradoxically married women are often more likely to develop depression.”

>> Related: Study: Grandparents who babysit grandkids could add years to their lives

Although the report showed women have more mental health issues, it noted suicide rates were three times higher among men than women. 

“Thankfully, women are more likely to also speak out about their mental health and seek support from services,” Stephen Buckley, spokesman for the U.K.-based mental health charity, Mind, said in the article

Want to learn more about the study? Take a look at the findings here

>> Related: Mushrooms may fight off aging, study says

Here’s why keeping a cell phone too close to your body might be bad for your health

Published: Friday, December 15, 2017 @ 8:42 PM


Alex Wong/Getty Images
(Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Do you sometimes sleep with your cell phone? The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) has issued a warning against it, because the radiation from the devices may be harmful to our bodies.

>> Read more trending news 

“Although the science is still evolving, there are concerns among some public health professionals and members of the public regarding long-term, high use exposure to the energy emitted by cell phones,” Karen Smith, CDPH director and state public health officer, said in a statement earlier this week. 

Why is it potentially dangerous?

When cellphones send and receive signals, they emit radio frequency energy, which maybe impact human health. “Children’s brains develop through the teenage years and may be more affected by cell phone use,” Smith wrote. 

>> Related: Do cell phones cause cancer? New study sheds light on lingering question

To limit the exposure, CDPH is implementing new guidelines, which include keeping the phone away from the body, reducing cellphone use when the signal is weak, decreasing the use of cell phones to stream audio or video, downloading or uploading large files and keeping the phone away from the bed at night.

They also are advising people to remove headsets when not on a call and to avoid products that claim to block radio frequency energy as they may actually increase your risk.

>> Related: Nighttime cellphone usage linked to poor mental health 

"We know that simple steps, such as not keeping your phone in your pocket and moving it away from your bed at night, can help reduce exposure for both children and adults," Smith said.

Take a look at the details of the recommendations here

>> Related: Study finds phones are dirtier than you think